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Drug interactions between acetaminophen / aluminum hydroxide / aspirin / caffeine / magnesium hydroxide and Metoprolol Succinate ER

Results for the following 2 drugs:
acetaminophen/aluminum hydroxide/aspirin/caffeine/magnesium hydroxide
Metoprolol Succinate ER (metoprolol)

Interactions between your drugs

Minor

metoprolol ↔ aspirin

Applies to:Metoprolol Succinate ER (metoprolol) and acetaminophen/aluminum hydroxide/aspirin/caffeine/magnesium hydroxide

High doses of salicylates may blunt the antihypertensive effects of beta-blockers. The proposed mechanism is inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. Low-dose aspirin does not appear to affect blood pressure. In addition, beta-blockers may exert an antiplatelet effect, which may be additive with the effects of some salicylates. Metoprolol may also increase aspirin absorption and/or plasma concentrations of salicylates; however, the clinical significance of this effect is unknown. Data have been conflicting. Until more information is available, patients who require concomitant therapy should be monitored for altered antihypertensive response whenever a salicylate is introduced or discontinued, or when its dosage is modified.

References

  1. Keber I, Jerse M, Keber D, Stegnar M "The influence of combined treatment with propranolol and acetylsalicylic acid on platelet aggregation in coronary heart disease." Br J Clin Pharmacol 7 (1979): 287-91
  2. Spahn H, Langguth P, Kirch W, et al "Pharmacokinetics of salicylates administered with metoprolol." Arzneimittelforschung 36 (1986): 1697-9
  3. Sziegoleit W, Rausch J, Polak G, et al "Influence of acetylsalicylic acid on acute circulatory effects of the beta-blocking agents pindolol and propranolol in humans." Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther Toxicol 20 (1982): 423-30
  4. Zanchetti A, Hansson L, Leonetti G, et al. "Low-dose aspirin does not interfere with the blood pressure-lowering effects of antihypertensive therapy." J Hypertens 20 (2002): 1015-1022
  5. Sziegoleit W, Rausch J , Polak G, Gyorgy M, Dekov E, Bekes M "Influence of acetylsalicylic acid on acute circulatory effects of the beta-blocking agents pindolol and propranolol." Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther Toxicol 20 (1982): 423-30
  6. Hartmann D, Stief G, Lingenfelder M, Guzelhan C, Horsch AK "Study on the possible interaction between tenoxicam and atenolol in hypertensive patients." Arzneimittelforschung 45-1 (1995): 494-8
View all 6 references

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Minor

metoprolol ↔ aluminum hydroxide

Applies to:Metoprolol Succinate ER (metoprolol) and acetaminophen/aluminum hydroxide/aspirin/caffeine/magnesium hydroxide

Concurrent administration with aluminum and magnesium antacids has been shown to decrease the oral bioavailability of certain beta-blockers, although data are conflicting. The exact mechanism of interaction is unknown but may involve cation binding of beta-blockers or a reduction in the dissolution rate due to increased gastric pH. In six healthy volunteers, concomitant administration of a single dose of antacid (magnesium hydroxide-aluminum oxide 1200 mg-1800 mg) reduced the peak plasma concentration (Cmax), area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) and 24-hour urinary excretion of sotalol (160 mg) by 27%, 21% and 9%, respectively, while administration of the antacid 2 hours after the sotalol dose produced no change. Pharmacodynamic data suggest that the negative chronotropic effect of sotalol was also reduced up to 4 hours after administration of the combination, although the lack of a placebo control might have confounded the results. In another study, concomitant administration of an aluminum hydroxide antacid in six healthy volunteers decreased atenolol (100 mg) Cmax and AUC by 37% and 33%, respectively. However, the Cmax and AUC of metoprolol (100 mg) in the same group was increased 25% and 11%, respectively, by administration of the antacid. Two other studies with aluminum hydroxide failed to find a significant effect on pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics of atenolol and propranolol. Based on available data, the clinical significance of this potential interaction is difficult to determine. As a precaution, patients may want to consider separating the administration times of beta-blockers and antacids or other aluminum- or magnesium-containing products by at least 2 hours.

References

  1. D'Arcy PF, McElnay JC "Drug-antacid interactions: assessment of clinical importance." Drug Intell Clin Pharm 21 (1987): 607-17
  2. Regardh CG, Lundborg P, Persson BA "The effect of antacid, metoclopramide, and propantheline on the bioavailability of metoprolol and atenolol." Biopharm Drug Dispos 2 (1981): 79-87
  3. Laer S, Neumann J, Scholz H "Interaction between sotalol and an antacid preparation." Br J Clin Pharmacol 43 (1997): 269-72
  4. Hong CY, Hu SC, Lin SJ, Chiang BN "Lack of influence of aluminum hydroxide on the bioavailability and beta-adrenoceptor blocking activity of propranolol." Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther Toxicol 23 (1985): 244-6
  5. Gugler R, Allgayer H "Effects of antacids on the clinical pharmacokinetics of drugs. An update." Clin Pharmacokinet 18 (1990): 210-9
  6. Kirch W, Schafer-Korting M, Axthelm T, Kohler H, Mutschler E "Interaction of atenolol with furosemide and calcium and aluminum salts." Clin Pharmacol Ther 30 (1981): 429-35
  7. Dobbs JH, Skoutakis VA, Acchiardo SR, Dobbs BR "Effects of aluminum hydroxide on the absorption of propranolol." Curr Ther Res Clin Exp 21 (1977): 887-92
View all 7 references

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Minor

metoprolol ↔ magnesium hydroxide

Applies to:Metoprolol Succinate ER (metoprolol) and acetaminophen/aluminum hydroxide/aspirin/caffeine/magnesium hydroxide

Concurrent administration with aluminum and magnesium antacids has been shown to decrease the oral bioavailability of certain beta-blockers, although data are conflicting. The exact mechanism of interaction is unknown but may involve cation binding of beta-blockers or a reduction in the dissolution rate due to increased gastric pH. In six healthy volunteers, concomitant administration of a single dose of antacid (magnesium hydroxide-aluminum oxide 1200 mg-1800 mg) reduced the peak plasma concentration (Cmax), area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) and 24-hour urinary excretion of sotalol (160 mg) by 27%, 21% and 9%, respectively, while administration of the antacid 2 hours after the sotalol dose produced no change. Pharmacodynamic data suggest that the negative chronotropic effect of sotalol was also reduced up to 4 hours after administration of the combination, although the lack of a placebo control might have confounded the results. In another study, concomitant administration of an aluminum hydroxide antacid in six healthy volunteers decreased atenolol (100 mg) Cmax and AUC by 37% and 33%, respectively. However, the Cmax and AUC of metoprolol (100 mg) in the same group was increased 25% and 11%, respectively, by administration of the antacid. Two other studies with aluminum hydroxide failed to find a significant effect on pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics of atenolol and propranolol. Based on available data, the clinical significance of this potential interaction is difficult to determine. As a precaution, patients may want to consider separating the administration times of beta-blockers and antacids or other aluminum- or magnesium-containing products by at least 2 hours.

References

  1. D'Arcy PF, McElnay JC "Drug-antacid interactions: assessment of clinical importance." Drug Intell Clin Pharm 21 (1987): 607-17
  2. Regardh CG, Lundborg P, Persson BA "The effect of antacid, metoclopramide, and propantheline on the bioavailability of metoprolol and atenolol." Biopharm Drug Dispos 2 (1981): 79-87
  3. Laer S, Neumann J, Scholz H "Interaction between sotalol and an antacid preparation." Br J Clin Pharmacol 43 (1997): 269-72
  4. Hong CY, Hu SC, Lin SJ, Chiang BN "Lack of influence of aluminum hydroxide on the bioavailability and beta-adrenoceptor blocking activity of propranolol." Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther Toxicol 23 (1985): 244-6
  5. Gugler R, Allgayer H "Effects of antacids on the clinical pharmacokinetics of drugs. An update." Clin Pharmacokinet 18 (1990): 210-9
  6. Kirch W, Schafer-Korting M, Axthelm T, Kohler H, Mutschler E "Interaction of atenolol with furosemide and calcium and aluminum salts." Clin Pharmacol Ther 30 (1981): 429-35
  7. Dobbs JH, Skoutakis VA, Acchiardo SR, Dobbs BR "Effects of aluminum hydroxide on the absorption of propranolol." Curr Ther Res Clin Exp 21 (1977): 887-92
View all 7 references

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Drug and food interactions

Major

aluminum hydroxide food

Applies to: acetaminophen / aluminum hydroxide / aspirin / caffeine / magnesium hydroxide

GENERALLY AVOID: The concomitant administration of aluminum-containing products (e.g., antacids and phosphate binders) and citrates may significantly increase serum aluminum concentrations, resulting in toxicity. Citrates or citric acid are contained in numerous soft drinks, citrus fruits, juices, and effervescent and dispersible drug formulations. Citrates enhance the gastrointestinal absorption of aluminum by an unknown mechanism, which may involve the formation of a soluble aluminum-citrate complex. Various studies have reported that citrate increases aluminum absorption by 4.6- to 50-fold in healthy subjects. Patients with renal insufficiency are particularly at risk of developing hyperaluminemia and encephalopathy. Fatalities have been reported. Patients with renal failure or on hemodialysis may also be at risk from soft drinks and effervescent and dispersible drug formulations that contain citrates or citric acid. It is unknown what effect citrus fruits or juices would have on aluminum absorption in healthy patients.

MANAGEMENT: The concomitant use of aluminum- and citrate-containing products and foods should be avoided by renally impaired patients. Hemodialysis patients should especially be cautioned about effervescent and dispersible over-the-counter remedies and soft drinks. Some experts also recommend that healthy patients should separate doses of aluminum-containing antacids and citrates by 2 to 3 hours.

ADJUST DOSING INTERVAL: The administration of aluminum-containing antacids with enteral nutrition may result in precipitation, formation of bezoars, and obstruction of feeding tubes. The proposed mechanism is the formation of an insoluble complex between the aluminum and the protein in the enteral feeding. Several cases of esophageal plugs and nasogastric tube obstructions have been reported in patients receiving high-protein liquids and an aluminum hydroxide-magnesium hydroxide antacid or an aluminum hydroxide antacid.

MANAGEMENT: Some experts recommend that antacids should not be mixed with or given after high protein formulations, that the antacid dose should be separated from the feeding by as much as possible, and that the tube should be thoroughly flushed before administration.

References

  1. Cerner Multum, Inc. "UK Summary of Product Characteristics." O 0
  2. Wohlt PD, Zheng L, Gunderson S, Balzar SA, Johnson BD, Fish JT "Recommendations for the use of medications with continuous enteral nutrition." Am J Health Syst Pharm 66 (2009): 1438-67

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Moderate

metoprolol food

Applies to: Metoprolol Succinate ER (metoprolol)

ADJUST DOSING INTERVAL: The bioavailability of metoprolol may be enhanced by food.

MANAGEMENT: Patients may be instructed to take metoprolol at the same time each day, preferably with or immediately following meals.

References

  1. Darcy PF "Nutrient-drug interactions." Adverse Drug React Toxicol Rev 14 (1995): 233-54
  2. "Product Information. Lopressor (metoprolol)." Novartis Pharmaceuticals, East Hanover, NJ.

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Minor

caffeine food

Applies to: acetaminophen / aluminum hydroxide / aspirin / caffeine / magnesium hydroxide

The effect of grapefruit juice on the pharmacologic activity of caffeine is controversial. One report suggests that grapefruit juice increases the effect of caffeine. The proposed mechanism is inhibition of cytochrome P-450 metabolism of caffeine. However, a well-conducted pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic study did not demonstrate this effect. The clinical significance of this potential interaction is unknown.

References

  1. "Grapefruit juice interactions with drugs." Med Lett Drugs Ther 37 (1995): 73-4
  2. Maish WA, Hampton EM, Whitsett TL, Shepard JD, Lovallo WR "Influence of grapefruit juice on caffeine pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics." Pharmacotherapy 16 (1996): 1046-52

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Therapeutic duplication warnings

No therapeutic duplications were found for your selected drugs.

Drug Interaction Classification

The classifications below are a guideline only. The relevance of a particular drug interaction to a specific patient is difficult to determine using this tool alone given the large number of variables that may apply.
Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.
Unknown No information available.

Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider.

Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Multum is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. In addition, the drug information contained herein may be time sensitive and should not be utilized as a reference resource beyond the date hereof. This material does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients, or recommend therapy. Multum's information is a reference resource designed as supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge, and judgement of healthcare practitioners in patient care. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for any given patient. Multum Information Services, Inc. does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. Copyright 2000-2018 Multum Information Services, Inc. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist.

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