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B-Caro-T (beta-carotene) Disease Interactions

There are 2 disease interactions with B-Caro-T (beta-carotene):

Major

Vitamin A (applies to B-Caro-T) hepatobiliary dysfunction

Major Potential Hazard, High plausibility. Applicable conditions: Liver Disease, Biliary Obstruction

Vitamin A (including beta-carotene) is fat soluble and requires bile for adequate intestinal absorption. Hepatic and/or biliary dysfunction decrease the absorption of vitamin A. Vitamin A is metabolized by the liver and primarily excreted in bile and feces. Beta-carotene is primarily metabolized in the GI mucosa to vitamin A. Hepatic and/or biliary impairment can alter the metabolic and therapeutic activity of Vitamin A.

References

  1. "Product Information. Epinephrine Hydrochloride Injection (epinephrine)." Abbott Pharmaceutical, Abbott Park, IL.
Moderate

Vitamin A (applies to B-Caro-T) malabsorption syndromes

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility.

Absorption of vitamin A depends on the presence of bile and absorbable fat in the GI tract. Prolonged fat malabsorption (cystic fibrosis, hepatic cirrhosis, sprue) or malabsorption syndromes (celiac disease, GI resection) can decrease the absorption of Vitamin A. Water- miscible vitamin A formulations may be an appropriate alternative in malabsorption conditions for certain conditions requiring vitamin A therapy.

References

  1. Piscatelli RL, Fox LM "Myocardial injury from epinephrine overdosage." Am J Cardiol 21 (1968): 735-7
  2. Tang WC, Weil MH, Sun SJ, Noc M, Yang LY, Gazmuri RJ "Epinephrine increases the severity of postresuscitation myocardial dysfunction." Circulation 92 (1995): 3089-93
  3. Ferry DR, Henry RL, Kern MJ "Epinephrine-induced myocardial infarction in a patient with angiographically normal coronary arteries." Am Heart J 111 (1986): 1193-5
  4. Reisner LS, Lippmann M "Ventricular arrhythmias after epinephrine injection in enflurane and in halothane anesthesia." Anesth Analg 54 (1975): 468-70
  5. "Product Information. Adrenalin Chloride Solution (epinephrine)." Parke-Davis, Morris Plains, NJ.
  6. Leon AS, Abrams WB "The role of catecholamines in producing arrhythmias." Am J Med Sci 262 (1971): 9-13
  7. Saff R, Nahhas A, Fink JN "Myocardial infarction induced by coronary vasospasm after self- administration of epinephrine." Ann Allergy 70 (1993): 396-8
  8. "Product Information. Epinephrine Hydrochloride Injection (epinephrine)." Abbott Pharmaceutical, Abbott Park, IL.
  9. Fyfe AI, Daly PA, Dorian P, Tough J "Reversible "cardiomyopathy" after accidental adrenaline overdose." Am J Cardiol 67 (1991): 318-9
  10. Stewart MJ, Fraser DM, Boon N "Dilated cardiomyopathy associated with chronic overuse of an adrenaline inhaler." Br Heart J 68 (1992): 221-2
  11. Lampe GH, Donegan JH, Rupp SM, Wauk LZ, Whitendale P, Fouts KE, Rose BM, Litt LL, Rampil IJ, Wilson CB, et al "Nitrous oxide and epinephrine-induced arrhythmias." Anesth Analg 71 (1990): 602-5
  12. Tisdale JE, Patel RV, Webb Cr, Borzak S, Zarowitz BJ "Proarrhythmic effects of intravenous vasopressors." Ann Pharmacother 29 (1995): 269-81
  13. Karch SB "Coronary artery spasm induced by intravenous epinephrine overdose." Am J Emerg Med 7 (1989): 485-8
View all 13 references

B-Caro-T (beta-carotene) drug interactions

There are 2 drug interactions with B-Caro-T (beta-carotene)

More about B-Caro-T (beta-carotene)

Related treatment guides

Drug Interaction Classification

These classifications are only a guideline. The relevance of a particular drug interaction to a specific individual is difficult to determine. Always consult your healthcare provider before starting or stopping any medication.
Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.
Unknown No interaction information available.

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.