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Trigger Finger

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW:

Trigger finger is when your finger or thumb gets stuck in a bent position and snaps, pops, or clicks when you straighten it.

DISCHARGE INSTRUCTIONS:

Medicines:

  • NSAIDs: These medicines decrease pain and swelling. NSAIDs can be bought without a doctor's order. Ask which medicine is right for you and how much to take. Take as directed. NSAIDs can cause stomach bleeding or kidney problems if not taken correctly.
  • Take your medicine as directed. Contact your healthcare provider if you think your medicine is not helping or if you have side effects. Tell him of her if you are allergic to any medicine. Keep a list of the medicines, vitamins, and herbs you take. Include the amounts, and when and why you take them. Bring the list or the pill bottles to follow-up visits. Carry your medicine list with you in case of an emergency.

Follow up with your healthcare provider or hand specialist as directed:

Write down your questions so you remember to ask them during your visits.

Physical therapy:

A physical therapist teaches you exercises to help improve movement and strength, and to decrease pain.

Splint:

You may need to wear a splint for up to 6 weeks to keep your finger straight. This will help your finger joints rest and prevent you from bending your finger while you sleep.

Contact your healthcare provider or hand specialist if:

  • Your symptoms do not go away or they return, even after treatment.
  • The pain, swelling, or stiffness interferes with your daily activities.
  • You have more trouble moving your finger.
  • Your finger is tingling.
  • You have questions or concerns about your condition or care.

Return to the emergency department if:

  • You cannot move your finger at all.
  • Your finger is numb.

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Learn more about Trigger Finger (Aftercare Instructions)

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