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Acute Nausea And Vomiting In Children

AMBULATORY CARE:

Acute nausea and vomiting in children

can occur for unknown reasons. Some common reasons for vomiting include gastroesophageal reflux or infection of the stomach, intestines, or urinary tract.

Other signs and symptoms your child may have:

  • Fever
  • Nausea and abdominal pain
  • Diarrhea
  • Dizziness

Seek care immediately if:

  • Your child has a seizure.
  • Your child's vomit contains blood or bile (green substance), or it looks like it has coffee grounds in it.
  • Your child is irritable and has a stiff neck and headache.
  • Your child has severe abdominal pain.
  • Your child says it hurts to urinate, or cries when he urinates.
  • Your child does not have energy, and is hard to wake up.
  • Your child has signs of dehydration such as a dry mouth, crying without tears, or urinating less than usual.

Contact your child's healthcare provider if:

  • Your baby has projectile (forceful, shooting) vomiting after a feeding.
  • Your child's fever increases or does not improve.
  • Your child begins to vomit more frequently.
  • Your child cannot keep any fluids down.
  • Your child's abdomen is hard and bloated.
  • You have questions or concerns about your child's condition or care.

Treatment:

Vomiting may go away on its own without treatment. The cause of your child's vomiting may need to be treated. Older children may be given antinausea medicine to prevent nausea and vomiting. An important goal of treatment is to make sure your child does not become dehydrated. Your child may be admitted to the hospital if he or she develops severe dehydration.

  • Give your child liquids as directed. Ask how much liquid your child should drink each day and which liquids are best. Children under 1 year old should continue drinking breast milk and formula. Your child's healthcare provider may recommend a clear liquid diet for children older than 1 year old. Examples of clear liquids include water, diluted juice, broth, and gelatin.
  • Give your child oral rehydration solution (ORS) as directed. ORS contains water, salts, and sugar that are needed to replace lost body fluids. Ask what kind of ORS to use, how much to give your child, and where to get it.

Follow up with your child's healthcare provider in 1 to 2 days:

Write down your questions so you remember to ask them during your child's visits.

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

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