Skip to Content

Join the 'Xeljanz' group to help and get support from people like you.

Xeljanz News

Arthritis Drug May Help With Type of Hair Loss

Posted 22 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 22, 2016 – For people who suffer from a condition that causes disfiguring hair loss, a drug used for rheumatoid arthritis might regrow their hair, a new, small study suggests. Alopecia areata is an autoimmune disease that causes patchy or complete hair loss, including on the head, body, eyebrows and eyelashes. Researchers found that more than 50 percent of 66 patients treated with the drug Xeljanz (tofacitinib citrate) saw hair regrowth in three months. "There is hope now that we will have more to tell patients than get counseling and a wig," said lead researcher Dr. Brett King, an assistant professor of dermatology at the Yale School of Medicine, in New Haven, Conn. Xeljanz appears to work by stopping the immune system's attack on hair follicles, King said. In addition, the researchers have identified genes that might predict a patient's response to treatment, he said. ... Read more

Related support groups: Rheumatoid Arthritis, Alopecia, Xeljanz, Xeljanz XR

Pfizer Announces FDA Approval of Xeljanz XR (tofacitinib citrate), the First and Only Once-Daily Oral JAK Inhibitor Treatment for Rheumatoid Arthritis

Posted 25 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

February 24, 2016 – Pfizer Inc. (NYSE:PFE) announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Xeljanz XR (tofacitinib citrate) extended-release 11 mg tablets for the once-daily treatment of moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in patients who have had an inadequate response or intolerance to methotrexate (MTX). Xeljanz XR is the first and only once-daily oral RA treatment in its class, known as Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors. “Pfizer continues to be an innovator in inflammation and immunology. The introduction of the first and only once-daily oral JAK inhibitor for RA, Xeljanz XR, builds upon Pfizer’s tradition of developing patient-centered therapies,” said Michael Corbo, Category Development Lead, Inflammation & Immunology, Pfizer Global Innovative Pharmaceuticals Business. “The availability of Xeljanz XR provides physicians with a new treatment opt ... Read more

Related support groups: Rheumatoid Arthritis, Xeljanz, Tofacitinib

Drugs Used in Cancer, Arthritis May Help Fight Hair Loss

Posted 23 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 23, 2015 – Two drugs – one approved for use in arthritis and the other approved for cancer – may also hold potential for boosting hair growth, new animal research suggests. "The ultimate potential is a very effective topical product to rub on the scalp to help with all types of hair loss," said Dr. Luis Garza, an associate professor of dermatology at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, who's familiar with the study findings. But he added, "More work needs to be done to translate these findings to a product which can be tested in a clinical trial on people." In the current study, researchers from Columbia University in New York City tested the drugs only on mice, including some with patches of human skin. If the medications work, it's not clear how much of the drugs may be needed for humans. It's also important to note that findings that look promising in animal research ... Read more

Related support groups: Rheumatoid Arthritis, Cancer, Alopecia, Xeljanz, Ruxolitinib, Diagnosis and Investigation, Jakafi, Tofacitinib

Drug for Rheumatoid Arthritis May Also Help Ease Vitiligo

Posted 24 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 24, 2015 – It's only been tested in one patient so far, but researchers report that a drug for rheumatoid arthritis may be a promising treatment for the discoloring skin condition known as vitiligo. Vitiligo is characterized by a disfiguring loss of pigmentation in skin. Most notably, pop star Michael Jackson suffered from the disorder much of his adult life. According to the Yale University researchers, current treatments are limited to steroid creams and light therapy, neither of which is reliably effective. "Current treatments for vitiligo can be cumbersome, expensive and have side effects, besides being less than optimal in results," said Dr. Doris Day, a dermatologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. She added that the downsides of vitiligo go beyond the cosmetic. "We know that appearance has a powerful impact on self esteem, and having white blotches that ... Read more

Related support groups: Rheumatoid Arthritis, Vitiligo, Xeljanz, Diagnosis and Investigation, Tofacitinib

Gene Discoveries Could Help Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatment

Posted 28 Apr 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 28, 2015 – Genetic variations may hold clues to rheumatoid arthritis – suggesting not only who will develop the painful condition, but also predicting its severity and even who might die from it, a new study says. "Genetic factors predisposing to disease, to disease severity, and response to treatment will allow tailoring treatment to individual patients' needs," said lead researcher Dr. Sebastien Viatte, a research fellow at the University of Manchester in England. Using data from several sources on thousands of patients in the United Kingdom, researchers found that gene mutations at a location on a chromosome called HLA-DRBl were associated with rheumatoid arthritis severity and the response to treatment with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor drugs. This study, Viatte said, is a potentially important first step toward personalized medicine for patients with the ... Read more

Related support groups: Rheumatoid Arthritis, Methotrexate, Humira, Enbrel, Remicade, Plaquenil, Hydroxychloroquine, Rituxan, Otezla, Imuran, Rituximab, Orencia, Cimzia, Arava, Leflunomide, Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis, Azathioprine, Simponi, Xeljanz, Infliximab

Some Arthritis Meds Cost Seniors Thousands Annually

Posted 21 Apr 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 21, 2015 – Arthritis medications known as biologic disease-modifying drugs can cost Medicare patients more than $2,700 in co-payments a year, a new report finds. Researchers say the tab is an immense burden on patients with disabling conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, a chronic disorder that affects an estimated 1.3 million Americans. Biologic anti-rheumatic medications – which include drugs such as adalimumab (Humira), anakinra (Kineret) and etanercept (Enbrel) – have allowed patients to gain better control of rheumatoid arthritis when taken early in the course of disease, the researchers explained. But some of the new drugs top $20,000 annually, according to the April 21 online report in the journal Arthritis & Rheumatology. "Many patients face a growing and unacceptable financial burden for access to treatment," said study lead author Dr. Jinoos Yazdany of the ... Read more

Related support groups: Rheumatoid Arthritis, Methotrexate, Humira, Enbrel, Remicade, Plaquenil, Hydroxychloroquine, Rituxan, Otezla, Imuran, Rituximab, Orencia, Arava, Leflunomide, Azathioprine, Xeljanz, Infliximab, Adalimumab, Etanercept, Apremilast

Hairless Man Now Hairy, Thanks to Arthritis Drug Xeljanz

Posted 22 Jun 2014 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 20, 2014 – A man with a rare condition that left him with no hair on his body grew a full head of hair after taking an arthritis drug, a new study reveals. The 25-year-old patient also grew eyebrows and eyelashes, along with facial, armpit and other hair after treatment with tofacitinib citrate. The man's lack of body hair was caused by a disease called alopecia universalis. The researchers said this is the first reported case of a successful targeted treatment for the disorder, which has no cure or long-term treatment. "The results are exactly what we hoped for," study senior author Dr. Brett King, an assistant professor of dermatology at Yale University School of Medicine, said in a university news release. "This is a huge step forward in the treatment of patients with this condition," King said. "While it's one case, we anticipated the successful treatment of this man ... Read more

Related support groups: Alopecia, Xeljanz, Tofacitinib

Ask a Question

Further Information

Related Condition Support Groups

Rheumatoid Arthritis

Xeljanz Patient Information at Drugs.com