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Related terms: Tooth Pain, Dental Pain

Health Tip: Kick Your Sugary Drink Habit

Posted 4 hours 2 minutes ago by Drugs.com

-- Your mouth may be loaded with bacteria just waiting to feast on sugar. And many sodas and juices contain added sugar, which can lead to tooth decay. Here are suggestions to spare your smile, courtesy of the American Dental Association: If you do drink something sugary, drink it quickly, which gives bacteria less time to feed. Drink tap water, which probably contains fluoride. Fluoride helps reduce your risk of cavities. Brush your teeth at least twice daily. At least once daily, carefully floss between teeth. Check labels and know which drinks have a lot of sugar. Teach kids, even younger ones, about making healthier choices. Read more

Related support groups: Oral and Dental Conditions, Toothache, Gingivitis, Periodontitis, Stomatitis, Prevention of Dental Caries, Teething Syndrome

Toothache? Neanderthals Might Have Reached for Aspirin, Too

Posted 16 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 8, 2017 – Dental care was decidedly primitive back in the time of the Neanderthals. But new research suggests these long-gone relatives of humans already had 21st century solutions to toothache pain – aspirin, and perhaps even penicillin. The study was led by Laura Weyrich, of the Australian Center for Ancient DNA (ACAD) at the University of Adelaide. Her team examined dental plaque from the remains of four Neanderthals found in caves in Belgium and Spain. This was the oldest such plaque ever to be genetically analyzed – between 42,000 to 50,000 years old. Weyrich said DNA analysis of ancient dental build-up can reveal a storehouse of knowledge. "Dental plaque traps microorganisms that lived in the mouth and pathogens found in the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract," she explained in a university news release. Plaque also harbors "bits of food stuck in the teeth ... Read more

Related support groups: Aspirin, Oral and Dental Conditions, Toothache, Excedrin, Gingivitis, Dental Abscess, Alka-Seltzer, Aggrenox, Fiorinal, Excedrin Migraine, Arthritis Pain, Ecotrin, Fiorinal with Codeine, Bayer Aspirin, Arthritis Pain Formula, Soma Compound, Norgesic, Periodontitis, Excedrin Extra Strength, Stomatitis

Health Tip: Attacked by Plaque

Posted 17 days ago by Drugs.com

-- Regular brushing, flossing and dental cleanings help rid your mouth of plaque – that gritty, sticky substance that's deadly for your teeth. The American Dental Association explains what plaque is and what it can do: Plaque is made up of bacteria that stick to your teeth and release acids after you eat. These acids eat away at tooth enamel and contribute to tooth decay and the formation of cavities. Plaque buildup creates tough-to-remove tartar, which attaches to tooth enamel and the gum line. Tartar buildup can lead to gingivitis, an early-stage gum disease that causes inflammation of the gums, irritation and redness. This can progress to a full-fledged gum disease called periodontitis. Read more

Related support groups: Oral and Dental Conditions, Toothache, Gingivitis, Periodontitis, Prevention of Dental Caries

Health Tip: Some Foods Are Good for Teeth

Posted 3 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

-- We all know what sugary foods and drinks can do to harm teeth, but there are also delicacies that can help your pearly whites. The American Dental Association says these foods contain nutrients that can help build strong teeth: Dairy products, such as milk, cheese and yogurt, which are rich in calcium. Leafy greens and almonds, which are also good sources of calcium. Eggs, fish, meat and poultry, which are rich in phosphorous. Vegetables and fruit, which are good sources of fiber. Citrus fruits, which are rich in vitamin C Sweet potatoes, carrots, leafy greens and fish, which are good sources of vitamin A. Read more

Related support groups: Oral and Dental Conditions, Toothache, Periodontitis, Stomatitis, Prevention of Dental Caries

DIY Teeth-Straightening: Don't Try This at Home

Posted 3 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 2, 2017 – An orthodontist recalled a patient who devised her own means of straightening two wayward teeth. "The patient tried to close a gap between her lower incisors by wrapping string around the two teeth," the orthodontist explained. But the do-it-yourself method brought only trouble. "I was horrified to see the string deep in the gum and the severe mobility in the two teeth," the unnamed orthodontist said. Examples of people attempting to straighten their own teeth – often using dubious "how-to" guides accessed on the Internet – is on the rise, according to a survey by the American Association of Orthodontists (AAO). People are resorting to the use of potentially dangerous objects such as rubber bands, string, paper clips and fake retainers to circumvent the orthodontists' office, the AAO said. But this type of jerry-rigged orthodontics can lead to permanent ... Read more

Related support groups: Oral and Dental Conditions, Toothache, Prevention of Dental Caries

Do Early Dental Visits Really Prevent Kids' Cavities?

Posted 28 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 28, 2017 – Children who start seeing the dentist before age 2 may not have any lower risk of cavities later on, a new study suggests. In fact, researchers found, youngsters who had early preventive dental care were more likely to need cavity treatment as they grew older, compared to other kids. "It's a counterintuitive finding," said lead researcher Justin Blackburn. He's an assistant professor at the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Public Health. "We're not trying to say that dentists are somehow causing kids to have tooth decay," he stressed. Nor do the findings mean that early dental care is useless, Blackburn said. He acknowledged that there were limitations to the study. For one, it included only children in Alabama's Medicaid program. So it's not clear whether the findings apply to U.S. kids more generally, Blackburn said. Still, the results question ... Read more

Related support groups: Oral and Dental Conditions, Toothache, Prevention of Dental Caries

Health Tip: Talk to the Dentist About a Sealant

Posted 28 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Brushing and flossing is important for children's teeth, and a sealant can offer added protection against cavities. A sealant is a resin material applied on teeth to fill in small spaces, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. Your child's dentist can apply the sealant at the office. It creates a barrier that protects tooth enamel from acids and bacteria that could lead to decay. A sealant – often a good idea for adults, too – may need to be reapplied every few years. Read more

Related support groups: Oral and Dental Conditions, Toothache, Prevention of Dental Caries

More Evidence Ties Gum Health to Stroke Risk

Posted 23 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 23, 2017 – Adults with gum disease may be twice as likely as people with healthy gums to suffer a stroke, new research suggests. It's not the first study to link gum disease and brain attacks caused by blood clots. However, the new findings expand on that knowledge by demonstrating a "dose-response" relationship. "The higher the level of gum disease, the worse the risk," explained study author Dr. Souvik Sen, chair of neurology at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine, in Columbia. Stroke risk rose with the level of gum disease; it was 1.9 times, 2.1 times and 2.2 times higher for people with mild, moderate and severe gum disease, respectively, the findings showed. One stroke expert said that was the most intriguing discovery in the study. "The fact that it is a dose-effect relationship, it's an important finding," said Dr. Maurizio Trevisan. He is dean of ... Read more

Related support groups: Ischemic Stroke, Oral and Dental Conditions, Toothache, Transient Ischemic Attack, Gingivitis, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Periodontitis, Stomatitis, Prevention of Dental Caries

Health Tip: Get Your Mouth Healthy Before Cancer Treatment

Posted 22 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

-- You have many things on your mind before you start cancer treatment, but a visit to your dentist should be on your to-do list. The American Dental Association recommends: Talk to your dentist about things that can help prevent dental complications from cancer treatment. Potential examples include fluoride treatment, replacing crowns or bridges, or treating existing gum disease. Brush your teeth twice daily with fluoride toothpaste. Choose a soft-bristled toothbrush, and soak it in warm water before brushing to soften bristles even more. Floss between teeth daily. Use caution where gums are sensitive or bleeding. Stop using tobacco, which can slow healing. Eat a balanced, nutritious diet. Rinse your mouth regularly to help prevent tooth decay. Skip alcohol-based rinses in favor of a salt-water rinse or a solution with baking soda. Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Oral and Dental Conditions, Xerostomia, Toothache, Burning Mouth Syndrome, Aphthous Ulcer, Gingivitis, Oral Thrush, Dental Abscess, Periodontitis, Stomatitis, Prevention of Dental Caries, Angular Cheilitis

Health Tip: Reducing Your Heart Disease Risk

Posted 20 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

-- If you have risk factors for heart disease, such as being overweight, eating unhealthy foods or being sedentary, take steps to lower your risk. The American Academy of Family Physicians recommends: Eat a healthy diet, consisting of lean proteins, vegetables, fruit and whole grains. Indulge occasionally in your favorite cravings. If you're overweight, set weight-loss goals. Even losing a small percentage of your body weight reduces your risk for heart disease. Get more active. Go for walks, dance, do sit-ups or push-ups. You don't have to join a gym to move more. Do not use tobacco in any form. Find healthy ways to control stress. Take care of your teeth and gums, as there is a link between gum disease and heart disease. You don't have to make all of these changes at once. Achieve one goal at a time. Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Weight Loss, Smoking, Heart Disease, Oral and Dental Conditions, Toothache, Smoking Cessation, Gingivitis, Dental Abscess, Periodontitis, Prevention of Dental Caries, Ischemic Heart Disease

Health Tip: Culprits Behind Stained Teeth

Posted 14 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

-- If your teeth aren't bright white, the foods you eat or habits such as smoking may be to blame. The American Dental Association mentions these potential factors for stained teeth: Drinking red wine, coffee or tea. Using tobacco. Getting older, which leads to enamel wear and allows yellowish dentin to show through. Using an antihistamine, high-blood pressure medication, some chemotherapy drugs or antipsychotic medication. Some children who take certain antibiotics also may have tooth discoloration. Read more

Related support groups: Smoking, Benadryl, Oral and Dental Conditions, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Toothache, Smoking Cessation, Promethazine, Claritin, Loratadine, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, Nicotine, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Gingivitis, Fexofenadine

Health Tip: Why Are Baby Teeth Important?

Posted 1 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Though baby teeth are only temporary, they're still important and need proper care. The American Dental Association says baby teeth: Help the young child with chewing, speech and smiling. Provide space for permanent teeth to eventually grow. Prevent permanent teeth from emerging too early, which could lead to misalignment and crowding. Read more

Related support groups: Oral and Dental Conditions, Toothache, Gingivitis, Periodontitis, Prevention of Dental Caries

Health Tip: Take Care of Your Teeth

Posted 24 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

-- You've resolved to take better care of yourself during the coming year. Don't forget your teeth. The American Dental Association offers this advice: Replace your toothbrush at least every four months, or whenever the bristles start to fray. Store your toothbrush in open air, standing up. Don't shortchange brushing time! Brush at least twice a day for two minutes each time. Brush gently, as vigorous brushing may damage teeth and gums. Wait at least 30 minutes after eating to brush your teeth, especially if you eat something highly acidic. Use a soft-bristled brush that's gentler on your teeth and gums. Use the right technique! Brush at a 45-degree angle to the gums, moving back and forth in gentle, short strokes. Read more

Related support groups: Oral and Dental Conditions, Toothache, Gingivitis, Periodontitis, Prevention of Dental Caries

First Stop for Scuba Divers: The Dentist's Office?

Posted 17 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 16, 2017 – The first time she tried scuba diving, Vinisha Ranna felt a squeezing sensation in her teeth. That experience led to a study that concluded divers often encounter dental problems underwater. Potentially, these problems include pain in the teeth, jaw and gums; loose crowns; and broken fillings, said Ranna, a dentist in training. "Divers are required to meet a standard of medical fitness before certification, but there are no dental health prerequisites," added Ranna, lead author of a new study on the subject. Ranna is a student in the University at Buffalo School of Dental Medicine in New York. She now advises scuba divers to seek dental care before diving if they have issues such as tooth decay or need restorations. After wondering about the odd dental sensation she felt during her initial 2013 dive, Ranna and her colleagues contacted 100 certified recreational ... Read more

Related support groups: Oral and Dental Conditions, Toothache, Dental Abscess, Periodontitis, Prevention of Dental Caries

Health Tip: Help Young Children Make Healthy Changes

Posted 12 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

-- A new year means a new chance to begin healthier habits. And even preschoolers can make healthier changes as they grow. The American Academy of Pediatrics says young children can resolve to: Put away toys and and clean up messes. Allow parents to help them brush their teeth twice daily. Always wash hands after using the bathroom and before and after eating. Help parents clean the table after eating. Be kind to animals, and always ask permission before petting an unfamiliar animal. Be kind to other kids, especially to those who seem sad, lonely or need a friend. Talk to parents or other adults they trust if they feel scared or need help. Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Oral and Dental Conditions, Toothache, Bacterial Skin Infection, Prevention of Dental Caries

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