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Health Tip: Perform Regular Skin Checks

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

-- Many skin cancers can be found early if you perform regular skin checks at home, the American Cancer Society says. The best time to do a monthly exam is right after a bath or shower. You should check for any new or changed moles, blemishes or birthmarks. Here are the Cancer Society's suggestions for performing a skin check: Face a mirror and check your face, ears, neck, chest and belly. Women should also examine their breasts and surrounding areas. Check your underarms, both sides of your arms, the tops and palms of your hands, between your fingers, and your fingernails. Sit down and check your thighs, shins, tops of your feet, between your toes and your toenails. Use a hand mirror to look at the bottoms of your feet, your calves and the backs of your thighs. Use the hand mirror to check your buttocks, genital area, lower and upper back, and the back of the neck and ears. Use a comb ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, History - Skin Cancer

Ozone Hole Smaller Thanks to Decades-Old Chemical Ban: Study

Posted 10 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 9, 2018 – NASA scientists say they have satellite evidence that the international ban on chlorine-containing chemicals called chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) has helped heal the massive hole that was chewed in the Earth's protective ozone layer. There now is roughly 20 percent less ozone depletion during the Antarctic winter than in 2005, a new study reports. "We see very clearly that chlorine from CFCs is going down in the ozone hole, and that less ozone depletion is occurring because of it," said study lead author Susan Strahan. She's an atmospheric scientist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. Stratospheric ozone protects life on Earth by absorbing potentially harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun. UV rays can cause skin cancer and cataracts, weaken the immune system and damage plant life. CFCs were used in everyday things from aerosols to air ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Sunburn, Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Prevention of Sunburn, History - Skin Cancer

Ozone Hole Smaller Thanks to Decades-Old Chemical Ban: Study

Posted 10 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 9, 2018 – NASA scientists say they have satellite evidence that the international ban on chlorine-containing chemicals called chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) has helped heal the massive hole that was chewed in the Earth's protective ozone layer. There now is roughly 20 percent less ozone depletion during the Antarctic winter than in 2005, a new study reports. "We see very clearly that chlorine from CFCs is going down in the ozone hole, and that less ozone depletion is occurring because of it," said study lead author Susan Strahan. She's an atmospheric scientist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. Stratospheric ozone protects life on Earth by absorbing potentially harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun. UV rays can cause skin cancer and cataracts, weaken the immune system and damage plant life. CFCs were used in everyday things from aerosols to air ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Sunburn, Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Prevention of Sunburn, History - Skin Cancer

5-FU Cream May Help Stop Skin Cancer's Return

Posted 14 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 5, 2018 – For people who've battled certain common forms of skin cancer, use of a generic cream called 5-FU may greatly reduce the odds that the disease will come back, new research shows. The study tracked outcomes for just over 930 U.S. veterans who averaged 70 years of age. All had already been diagnosed with a minimum of two basal cell carcinomas and/or squamous cell carcinomas. That meant their risk for a skin cancer recurrence was high, the researchers said. However, just a month's application of 5-FU (fluorouracil 5 percent) appeared to have a lasting impact in preventing a recurrence – even after use of the cream was stopped. So concludes a study led by Dr. Martin Weinstock, professor of dermatology at Brown University in Providence. "The most remarkable thing about this study is that now we have something to use that doesn't lose its effectiveness when you stop ... Read more

Related support groups: Fluorouracil, Efudex, Basal Cell Carcinoma, Carac, Skin Cancer, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Fluoroplex, Tolak, History - Skin Cancer, Adrucil, Fluorac, Diclofenac/fluorouracil, Efudex Occlusion Pack

Obamacare Helped More Americans Spot Cancer Early

Posted 22 Dec 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 21, 2017 – Obamacare has likely saved lives by increasing the number of cancers caught at an early stage, a new study suggests. States that participate in the Affordable Care Act's expansion of Medicaid have experienced an increase in overall cancer diagnoses, particularly early stage diagnoses, compared with states that rejected expansion, researchers found. "It's been well-established that catching cancer in its early phases increases the likelihood of successful treatment and reduces the chances of death," said lead researcher Aparna Soni. "We found that states that participated in Medicaid expansion experienced much greater increases in cancer detection," said Soni, a doctoral candidate at the Indiana University School of Business in Bloomington. Medicaid is the publicly funded insurance program for the poor. The study findings indicate that cancers may go undetected ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Basal Cell Carcinoma, Colorectal Cancer, Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Breast Cancer, Prevention, History - Skin Cancer

Firefighters May Face Higher Odds for Skin Cancer

Posted 13 Dec 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 13, 2017 – Exposure to firefighting chemicals may be one reason why Florida firefighters have a higher-than-normal rate of skin cancer, a new study suggests. The researchers analyzed data from almost 2,400 firefighters statewide who'd participated in a cancer survey. They found that 4.5 percent – 109 firefighters – had been diagnosed with skin cancer. That included 17 cases of melanoma, 84 cases of other types of skin cancer and 18 of an unknown type of skin cancer. The melanoma rate among the firefighters was 0.7 percent, compared with 0.011 percent in the general population, according to the researchers. "We believe there are chemicals in the work environment that, when firefighters come into contact with them, might be increasing the risk for specific kinds of cancer," study leader Dr. Alberto Caban-Martinez, said in a University of Miami news release. He's with ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, History - Skin Cancer

Woman's Selfie of Skin Cancer Went Viral, Sparked Awareness

Posted 13 Dec 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 13, 2017 – You don't have to be famous for your public health message to reach millions. A new case study describes how Tawny Dzierzek, a young nurse from Kentucky, posted a startling selfie on social media in April 2015, shortly after she had a skin cancer treatment. Dzierzek was a regular user of tanning beds in her youth. She was diagnosed with skin cancer at age 21. By the time she was 27, she'd had basal cell skin cancer five times, and squamous cell skin cancer once. Her selfie was shared 50,000 times on social media in less than a month, and her story received widespread media attention. Google searches about skin cancer climbed to near-record levels when news coverage about Dzierzek's selfie was at its peak, according to the case study published Dec. 13 in the journal Preventive Medicine. Online searches about skin cancer and tanning were as much as 489 percent ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Sunburn, Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Prevention of Sunburn, History - Skin Cancer

How to Do a Skin Cancer Body Check

Posted 15 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 15, 2017 – Every year, about 5 million Americans are treated for skin cancer – an abnormal growth of skin cells that most often develops on areas exposed to the sun. You can spot early signs by regularly checking your skin for changes. Everyone is susceptible to skin cancer. However, people who have light skin that burns easily, red hair, and/or blue eyes have a higher risk. Three types of skin cancer account for nearly all cases: basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas and, the most dangerous, melanoma. Follow the A-B-C-D-E method to help you know when a growth needs to be evaluated by your doctor. Here's what to look for when evaluating skin growths: Asymmetry: The two halves of the growth don't match. Border: The edges are irregular or poorly defined. Color: You see various shades of tan, brown, black or even white, red or blue. Diameter: Melanomas are often the ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Diagnosis and Investigation, History - Skin Cancer, Merkel Cell Carcinoma

Some Guys Can't Stay Away From Tanning Beds

Posted 8 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8, 2017 – Indoor tanning appears to be more addictive for men than women, even though they use tanning beds less than females, a new study finds. The stereotypical tanning salon client is a young woman, so they are the focus of most research and health warnings about tanning. But the authors behind the new study concluded that anti-tanning efforts should also target men. The findings were "really surprising," said study author Sherry Pagoto, director of the University of Connecticut Center for mHealth and Social Media. "If they tan with the same frequency as women, why would tanning in men be more addictive?" The researchers surveyed more than 600 tanning bed users across the United States. One-third were male. Compared to women, men were more likely to say they felt anxious if they weren't able to tan, that they tanned to relieve stress and that they spent money on ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Sunburn, Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Prevention of Sunburn

Waiting Even a Month to Remove Melanoma Can Be Deadly

Posted 7 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 7, 2017 – The sooner the deadly skin cancer melanoma is treated, the more likely a patient is to survive. Researchers analyzed data from more than 153,000 American adults diagnosed with stage 1 to 3 melanoma between 2004 and 2012. No matter what stage their cancer was, those who waited more than 90 days for surgical treatment were more likely to die. And postponing surgery for more than 29 days led to lower survival rates for patients with stage 1 melanoma, though not for those with stage 2 or 3. Compared to patients who were treated within 30 days, patients with stage 1 melanoma were 5 percent more likely to die when treated between 30 and 59 days. Their risk of death rose 16 percent when treated between 60 and 89 days; 29 percent when treated between 91 and 120 days; and 41 percent when treated after 120 days. Patients who put off their treatment tended to be older men ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Merkel Cell Carcinoma, History - Skin Cancer

Health Tip: Avoid UV Radiation

Posted 31 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Ultraviolet (UV) radiation coming from the sun is a major cause of skin cancer. The American Cancer Society suggests how to minimize the effects of UV rays: UV rays are strongest between the hours of 10 am and 4 pm. If you must be outside during this time, stay in the shade as much as possible. Always wear sunscreen when you're outside. Cover most parts of your skin with clothing. Wear a hat to protect your head, neck and face. Wear sunglasses that are designed to block UV rays. Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Sunburn, Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Sunscreen, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Prevention of Sunburn, History - Skin Cancer, Deeptan, Coppertone

Almost 4 in 10 Tanning Salons Flout State Laws

Posted 25 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 25, 2017 – Nearly 40 percent of indoor tanning facilities ignore state laws that curb teen tanning, a new survey finds. To protect teens, most states have laws that prevent or create obstacles to using tanning salons, but nearly 2 million high school kids still get indoor tans, said the researchers who conducted the survey. "The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has classified tanning beds as cancer causing," said the survey's lead researcher, Dr. Erik Stratman, a dermatologist at the Marshfield Clinic in Marshfield, Wis. Indoor tanning is particularly dangerous for young people, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, because it increases their risk for melanoma, a deadly form of skin cancer. Banning indoor tanning for teens might prevent thousands of melanomas and melanoma deaths and the millions spent on treatment, Stratman said. "While no ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Sunburn, Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Sunscreen, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Prevention of Sunburn, History - Skin Cancer, Merkel Cell Carcinoma, Deeptan, Coppertone

Tighter Rules on Arsenic in Water Saved Lives: Study

Posted 23 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 23, 2017 – U.S. government limits on arsenic in drinking water has likely averted hundreds of cases of lung and bladder cancer annually, a new study suggests. After the Environmental Protection Agency introduced tighter limits on arsenic in public drinking water in 2006, there was a 17 percent decrease in levels of arsenic in the urine of people served by public water systems that complied with the rule, the researchers found. Not only that, but there were an estimated 200 fewer cases of lung and bladder cancer a year after the tougher rules were put in place. Levels of arsenic in the urine of people who used private wells did not change, according to the study published Oct. 23 in The Lancet Public Health journal. Arsenic is a carcinogen that naturally occurs in drinking water across the United States. The study findings highlight the important role that government ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Skin Cancer, Bladder Cancer, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Trisenox, Bronchogenic Carcinoma, Arsenic Trioxide

1 in 5 Young Women Who Tan Indoors Get Addicted

Posted 19 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 19, 2017 – More than 20 percent of young white women who've been to a tanning salon become addicted to tanning – even though doing so raises their risk of deadly skin cancer and premature skin aging, a new study reports. These women seem to depend on tanning to feel attractive and often show symptoms of depression, the researchers said. "Indoor tanning remains a public health concern for skin cancer prevention," said lead researcher Darren Mays, an assistant professor of oncology at Georgetown University Medical Center in Washington, D.C. "Our study indicates a substantial proportion of young women who indoor tan may become dependent, putting this group at especially high risk for skin cancer later in life," he said. Indoor tanning is dangerous. It increases the risk of melanoma, the most deadly cancer, by 20 percent and increases the risk of other skin cancers as well, ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Basal Cell Carcinoma, Sunburn, Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Sunscreen, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, History - Skin Cancer, Deeptan, Coppertone

With Skin Cancer Surgery, Insurance Matters

Posted 16 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 16, 2017 – Surgery is the main treatment for melanoma – a dangerous form of skin cancer – but a patient's insurance could affect whether or not that cancer is quickly removed, new research suggests. After reviewing thousands of melanoma cases, researchers at the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center reported that patients with Medicaid were more likely to face delays in scheduling their surgery than those with private insurance. Medicaid is the federally funded health insurance program for poor and needy people. "The primary treatment for most melanoma is surgical excision, which can be curative," said study author Dr. Ade Adamson, a clinical instructor in the UNC School of Medicine's department of dermatology. "These delays in care are concerning, particularly if they disproportionately affect those who might be the most vulnerable, such as ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Melanoma - Metastatic, Surgical Prophylaxis, History - Skin Cancer

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