Skip to Content

Join the 'Skin and Structure Infection' group to help and get support from people like you.

Skin and Structure Infection News

Related terms: Complicated Skin and Skin Structure Infection, cSSSI

Skin Condition Often Misdiagnosed as Bacterial Problem

Posted 4 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 4, 2016 – Misdiagnosis of the bacterial skin condition cellulitis often leads to unnecessary antibiotic use and hospitalizations, a new study says. About one-third of people diagnosed with cellulitis don't actually have it, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston found. The researchers looked at a 30-month period, examining the medical records of 259 people hospitalized for lower extremity cellulitis in the hospital's emergency department. But, 79 of the patients didn't have cellulitis. Almost 85 percent didn't need hospitalization and 92 percent didn't need the antibiotics they received, the researchers said. Looking at how their findings might reflect the nation as a whole, the researchers estimated that the misdiagnosed skin condition leads to about 130,000 unnecessary hospitalizations. The problem may cause up to $515 million in unneeded medical ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Skin Rash, Skin Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection, Skin and Structure Infection, Secondary Cutaneous Bacterial Infections, Minor Skin Conditions

Gene Therapy May Hold Promise for Blistering Skin Disease

Posted 1 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 1, 2016 – Gene therapy shows promise in treating a genetic skin disease that causes blistering, according to researchers. In the early stage clinical trial, researchers from the Stanford University School of Medicine tested the therapy on four adults with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. People with this skin condition aren't able to produce a protein that binds the upper and lower levels of skin together. At the slightest friction, these layers slide and create blisters. In the worst cases, death occurs in infancy, the researchers said. In the current research, grafts of the patients' own genetically corrected skin were applied to open wounds caused by the disease. The grafts improved wound healing and seemed to be well-tolerated, researchers reported. "Our phase 1 trial shows the treatment appears safe, and we were fortunate to see some good clinical ... Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash, Skin and Structure Infection, Diagnosis and Investigation

'Medical Tattoos' Help Hide Surgical Scars

Posted 23 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 23, 2016 – Patients with unsightly scars from cancer surgeries may benefit from "medical tattoos" that can help restore some of the skin's natural appearance, Dutch researchers report. The researchers surveyed 56 patients who got medical tattoos on their head and neck, and found they were pleased with the results. "The mystery until now was how well patients appreciated the technique," said study co-author Dr. Rick van de Langenberg, an ear, nose and throat surgeon at Maastricht University in the Netherlands. In addition to saying their scars looked better, "patients were less stressed about the appearance of the scar and thought less about it," he said. U.S. experts noted that the procedure is common in the United States. In a general sense, "medical tattooing had been performed in the U.S. for decades," said Dr. Fred Fedok, president-elect of the American Academy of ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Cancer, Skin and Structure Infection, Keloids

New Test Help Detect Drug-Resistant Bacteria

Posted 1 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 30, 2016 – The Xpert Carba-R Assay diagnostic, which tests patient specimens for genetic markers associated with drug-resistant bacteria, has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The test specifically looks for bacteria resistant to Carbapenem antibiotics, powerful drugs typically given in hospitals to treat severe infections. Standard methods require the organisms to be grown and tested in lab cultures, which can take four days or longer, the FDA said in a news release. However, the agency stressed the new test only determines the presence of certain genetic markers, not for the actual resistant bacteria. It advised that hospitals should continue to use culture-based testing to confirm findings from the new test. In two clinical studies involving more than 1,100 people, the new test was found to be as effective as culture-based testing in evaluating ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection, Skin and Structure Infection

Allergan Receives FDA Approval of Teflaro (ceftaroline fosamil) for Pediatric Patients

Posted 8 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

DUBLIN, May 31, 2016 /PRNewswire/ – Allergan plc (NYSE: AGN), a leading global pharmaceutical company, today announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the company's supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) for Teflaro (ceftaroline fosamil), granting new indications for pediatric patients 2 months of age to less than 18 years of age with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI), including infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and other designated susceptible bacteria. "The impact of ABSSSI and CABP among children is significant, as these infections often require hospitalization and are met with limited pediatric treatment options, particularly as resistance increases among the pathogens that cause these infections," said ... Read more

Related support groups: Pneumonia, Skin and Structure Infection, Ceftaroline, Teflaro

Theravance Biopharma Announces FDA Approval of Expanded Label for Vibativ (telavancin)

Posted 10 May 2016 by Drugs.com

DUBLIN, IRELAND – (Marketwired) – 05/09/16 – Theravance Biopharma, Inc. (NASDAQ: TBPH) ("Theravance Biopharma" or the "Company") today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the Company's supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) for Vibativ (telavancin) to expand the product's label to include data describing the treatment of patients with concurrent Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) bacteremia in both of the antibiotic's currently approved indications in the United States. Vibativ is approved in the U.S. for the treatment of adult patients with hospital-acquired and ventilator-associated bacterial pneumonia (HABP/VABP) caused by susceptible isolates of S. aureus when alternative treatments are not suitable. In addition, Vibativ is approved in the U.S. for the treatment of adult patients with complicated skin & skin structure infections (cSSSI) caused ... Read more

Related support groups: Pneumonia, Skin and Structure Infection, Bacteremia, Vibativ, Telavancin

Skin Infections Common in High School Wrestlers, Study Finds

Posted 10 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 10, 2016 – Wrestlers are much more likely to suffer skin infections than other U.S. high school athletes, new research shows. The study authors examined five years of data on skin infections among athletes in 22 high school sports. Nearly 74 percent of skin infections occurred among wrestlers, and just under 18 percent among football players, the investigators found. The actual rates of skin infections per 100,000 exposures (one athlete participating in one practice, competition or performance) were 28.5 among wrestlers and 2.3 among football players. Rates in most other sports were less than 1 per 100,000, and eight sports had none, according to the report. "Given the nature of the sport, it's not surprising that wrestlers suffer the most skin infections," study senior author Dr. Robert Dellavalle, an associate professor of dermatology at the University of Colorado ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection, Fungal Infections, Tinea Corporis, Skin and Structure Infection, Candida Infections, Tinea Cruris, Tinea Pedis, Fungal Infection Prophylaxis, Fungal Infection Prevention

Allergan Announces FDA Approval of Updated Label for New Dosing Regimen for Dalvance (dalbavancin)

Posted 22 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

DUBLIN, Jan. 21, 2016 /PRNewswire/ – Allergan plc (NYSE: AGN), a leading global pharmaceutical company, today announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the company's supplemental new drug application (sNDA) to update the label for Dalvance (dalbavancin) for injection. The expanded label will include a single dose administered as a 30-minute intravenous (IV) infusion of Dalvance for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) caused by designated susceptible Gram-positive bacteria in adults, including infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Dalvance is the first and only 30-minute, single-dose treatment option for ABSSSI that delivers a full course of IV therapy, providing an alternative dosing option for physicians. "Hospitals are facing pressures to reduce hospitalizations and readmissions, ... Read more

Related support groups: Skin and Structure Infection, Dalvance, Dalbavancin

Suspicious Pigment Spots More Common on Darker Skin

Posted 14 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Dec. 14, 2015 – People with darker skin are about one-third more likely to have potentially dangerous pigment "spots" on their palms and soles, a new study finds. In rare cases, these "acral pigmented lesions" turn out to be melanoma skin cancer. People with these lesions should have them checked by a dermatologist to be sure they are benign, the researchers said. Reggae musician Bob Marley, for example, died from acral melanoma, which was diagnosed under his toenail. "Acral pigmented lesions have not been well studied in people with darker skin," senior study author Dr. Jennifer Stein, an associate professor in the department of dermatology at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City, said in a center news release. Stein's team evaluated the palms and soles of 1,052 patients seen at dermatology clinics in New York City and Miami. The researchers detected 391 acral pigmented ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Sunburn, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Skin and Structure Infection, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Photoaging of the Skin, Scrapes, History - Skin Cancer, Dermatoheliosis, Prevention of Sunburn, Minor Skin Conditions

New Antibiotic-Resistant 'Superbug' an Emerging Threat, CDC Says

Posted 5 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 – A relatively new antibiotic-resistant bacteria called CRE is making inroads in some major American cities, U.S. health officials report. Surveillance of seven U.S. metropolitan areas found higher-than-expected levels of CRE in Atlanta, Baltimore and New York City, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Lower-than-expected levels were found in Albuquerque, Denver and Portland, Ore., while the Minneapolis rate was what the agency anticipated. But CDC researchers were dismayed that they found active cases of CRE infection in every city they examined, said senior author Dr. Alexander Kallen, a CDC medical officer. The results support the CDC's decision to promote coordinated regional efforts to prevent the spread of CRE and other antibiotic-resistant germs, Kallen said. "Here we are with an opportunity to intervene on one of these ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Metronidazole, Bacterial Infection, Bactrim, Flagyl, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection, Bactrim DS, Sulfamethoxazole/Trimethoprim, Xifaxan, Polymyxin B, Skin and Structure Infection, Septra, Bacitracin, Rifaximin, Metro, SMZ-TMP DS, Septra DS, Sulfatrim, Chloramphenicol

Guidelines for Preventing Catheter Infections in ICU Often Ignored: Study

Posted 28 Aug 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 28, 2015 – Many health-care providers don't follow guidelines meant to reduce the risk of infection from catheters placed in the arteries of intensive care unit patients, a new study finds. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says health-care providers should wear sterile gloves, a surgical cap and mask, and use a small sterile drape when inserting catheters into patients' arteries. But a Rhode Island Hospital survey of more than 1,200 health-care providers found that only 44 percent followed the CDC recommendations during insertion. And only 15 percent used "full barrier precautions." The participants' responses were anonymous. "Barrier precautions are employed inconsistently by critical care clinicians across the nation, and such individuals underestimate the infection risks posed by arterial catheters," study co-author Dr. Leonard Mermel, medical ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Skin Infection, Skin and Structure Infection, Vascular Surgery

Health Tip: Minimize Scarring

Posted 19 Aug 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Minor wounds and surgical scars should heal themselves, but there are things you can do to minimize scarring. The American Academy of Dermatology recommends: Use gentle soap and water to clean the area. Apply a bit of petroleum jelly to keep the skin moist. Use an adhesive bandage to cover a wound after it has been washed and protected with petroleum jelly. Change the bandage daily. Follow your doctor's recommendations for wounds that needed stitches. Once the skin has healed, protect it with sunscreen. Read more

Related support groups: Skin and Structure Infection, Keloids, Scrapes, Wound Cleansing, Minor Cuts, Wound Debridement, Minor Skin Conditions

Beach Sand, Not Water, More Likely to Make You Sick

Posted 17 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 17, 2015 – Heading to the beach this weekend? A new study finds that when it comes to germs, beachgoers may have more to fear from the sand they sit on than the water they swim in. Studies done with water and sand from Hawaiian beaches found a "higher abundance" of bacteria indicating fecal contamination – bugs such a E. coli, for example – in the sand than in the water. In fact, "wastewater-contaminated marine beach sand may act as a chronic source of wastewater bacteria to the beach seawater," writes a team led by Tao Yan of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Public health experts have long known that wastewater from sewage and other sources can contaminate seawater, some days necessitating beach closures. Swimmers who come into contact with or accidentally swallow fecal-contaminated water can suffer stomach ache, diarrhea and rashes, Yan's team noted. However, the ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection, Skin and Structure Infection, Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Infection Prophylaxis, Traveler's Diarrhea Prophylaxis

Tattoos May Pose Health Risks, Researchers Report

Posted 28 May 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 28, 2015 – Getting a tattoo may put you at risk for long-term skin problems, a new study warns. "We were rather alarmed at the high rate of reported chronic complications tied to getting a tattoo," said senior investigator Dr. Marie Leger, an assistant professor in the dermatology department at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City. "Given the growing popularity of tattoos, physicians, public health officials and consumers need to be aware of the risks involved," Leger said in a Langone news release. For the study, researchers surveyed about 300 New York City adults, aged 18 to 69, with tattoos. Most of them had no more than five tattoos, and the arm was the most popular tattoo site (67 percent). Up to 6 percent of the study participants experienced some form of tattoo-related rash, infection, severe itching or swelling that sometimes lasted longer than four months. ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Skin Infection, Eczema, Bacterial Skin Infection, Dermatitis, Contact Dermatitis, Skin and Structure Infection, Atopic Dermatitis, Secondary Cutaneous Bacterial Infections

Athletes Need to Guard Against Skin Woes

Posted 24 Mar 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 24, 2015 – Sprains and fractures aren't the only hazards athletes face. Certain skin problems are also common among sports enthusiasts. The five skin conditions most often seen in athletes are blisters; turf burn (abrasions from falls on an artificial surface); athlete's foot (a fungal infection); sun exposure, and a type of acne called acne mechanica, according to the American Academy of Dermatology in their news release. "Athletes who are aware of these five common issues can take action to prevent the vast majority of dermatologic problems they may encounter," said Dr. Brian Adams in the academy release. He is professor and chair of dermatology at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. Blisters are caused by heat, moisture and friction between the skin and shoes. Adams said the best way to prevent blisters is to wear synthetic, moisture-wicking socks, which ... Read more

Related support groups: Acne, Skin Rash, Skin Infection, Skin and Structure Infection, Tinea Pedis

Page 1 2 Next

Ask a Question

Further Information

Related Condition Support Groups

Deep Neck Infection, Infections

Related Drug Support Groups

azithromycin, Cipro, ciprofloxacin, Augmentin, Zithromax, minocycline, clarithromycin, cefdinir, Bactroban, view more... mupirocin, Avelox, Biaxin, amoxicillin / clavulanate, cefuroxime, Rocephin, Omnicef, Ceftin, Zyvox, cloxacillin, ceftriaxone, Ceclor, cefadroxil, moxifloxacin, cefaclor, tea tree, daptomycin, Azithromycin Dose Pack, Biaxin XL, Cubicin, cefepime, Amoclan, linezolid, meropenem, Unasyn, Augmentin XR, nafcillin, Minocin, Duricef, cephradine, Merrem, Augmentin ES-600, Bactroban Nasal, Vibativ, Teflaro, Orbactiv, Centany, Zmax, Tygacil, Velosef, Ceclor CD, Primaxin IM, Cipro XR, bacampicillin, Spectracef, tigecycline, ceftaroline, cefoxitin, cefditoren, Cipro IV, goldenseal, Fortaz, cilastatin / imipenem, Garamycin Topical, G-Myticin, Cloxapen, Myciguent, Spectrobid, ceftazidime, cefonicid, Trovan, Dalvance, Sivextro, aztreonam, Cubicin RF, Ximino, Tegopen, Omnicef Omni-Pac, Avelox IV, Centany Kit, OraMagic Rx, Merrem Novaplus, Monocid, Azactam, Myrac, oritavancin, tedizolid, dalbavancin, Dynacin, Maxipime, ampicillin / sulbactam, Zinacef, Tazicef, Mefoxin, Raniclor, Primaxin IV, Nallpen, telavancin, Kefurox, Ceclor Pulvules, Unipen, Cipro Cystitis Pack, Proquin XR, Ceptaz, Tazidime, Tazicef Novaplus, trovafloxacin