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Pulmonary Hypertension News

Related terms: PAH, Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

Uptravi Approved for Chronic Lung Disease

Posted 23 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 22, 2015 – Uptravi (selexipag) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat adults with pulmonary arterial hypertension, a disabling lung disease that often leads to death or the need for lung transplant. PAH is high blood pressure that affects arteries that connect the lungs and heart. It causes the heart to work harder, resulting in shortness of breath and limiting the ability to exercise, the FDA said Tuesday in a news release. Uptravi, among a class of drugs called oral IP prostacyclin receptor agonists, relaxes and opens blood vessels, easing the elevated pressure, the agency said. The drug was evaluated in clinical trials involving more than 1,150 adults with PAH. Trial participants who took the drug did so for an average of about a year and a half. The drug was found to limit worsening of the disease and reduce the need for hospitalization. ... Read more

Related support groups: Pulmonary Hypertension, Uptravi, Selexipag

FDA Approves Uptravi (selexipag) for Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

Posted 23 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

December 22, 2015 – On December 21, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Uptravi (selexipag) tablets to treat adults with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a chronic, progressive, and debilitating rare lung disease that can lead to death or the need for transplantation. “Uptravi offers an additional treatment option for patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension,” said Ellis Unger, M.D., director of the Office of Drug Evaluation I in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “The FDA supports continued efforts to provide new treatment options for rare diseases.” PAH is high blood pressure that occurs in the arteries that connect the heart to the lungs. It causes the right side of the heart to work harder than normal, which can lead to limitations on exercise ability and shortness of breath, among other more serious complications. Uptravi belongs to a class o ... Read more

Related support groups: Pulmonary Hypertension, Uptravi, Selexipag

New Guidelines Focus on Pulmonary Hypertension in Kids

Posted 3 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 3, 2015 – The first guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary hypertension in children have been released by the American Heart Association and the American Thoracic Society. Pulmonary hypertension is a sometimes fatal heart and lung disease that affects nearly two of every 1,000 babies born each year. Children with the condition have blockages in the blood vessels of their lungs, making it harder for the heart to pump blood through them. Symptoms include shortness of breath, fainting and appearing blue. "These children suffer with health issues throughout their lives or die prematurely – particularly if they're not properly diagnosed and managed. But with the proper diagnosis and treatment at a specialized center for pulmonary hypertension, the prognosis for many of these children is excellent," guidelines committee co-chairman Dr. Stephen Archer said in an ... Read more

Related support groups: Pulmonary Hypertension

Exercise Appears Safe, Helpful for Pulmonary Hypertension

Posted 4 Sep 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 4, 2015 – Exercise can be beneficial and safe for people with pulmonary hypertension, researchers report. Pulmonary hypertension is a type of high blood pressure that affects the lungs and heart, causing breathing problems, fatigue and dizziness. Left untreated, it can lead to heart failure, according to background information from the study. "Clinicians have traditionally been skeptical about prescribing exercise for patients with chronic pulmonary hypertension due to concerns that training might put further strain on the heart," said study senior author Dr. Jarett Berry. He is an associate professor of internal medicine and clinical sciences at University of Texas (UT) Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. "Our analysis found those concerns may be misplaced. More importantly, exercise had a positive effect on several measures of heart function as well as overall ... Read more

Related support groups: Pulmonary Hypertension

Impotence Drug Aids Treatment of Rare Lung Disease: Study

Posted 26 Aug 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 26, 2015 – A combination treatment using the erectile dysfunction drug Cialis may greatly reduce death and hospitalization from an incurable lung disease that mainly affects women, a new clinical trial shows. Cialis combined with a blood pressure medication called ambrisentan (Letairis) significantly reduced the progression of pulmonary arterial hypertension, according to results published in the Aug. 27 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. The condition involves high blood pressure in the arteries leading into the lungs. People who took the combination therapy were half as likely to die, require hospitalization or have severe progression of their illness, when compared with people who only received one of the two drugs, researchers found. The results are so encouraging that the maker of Cialis, GlaxoSmithKline, has submitted them to the U.S. Food and Drug ... Read more

Related support groups: Cialis, Pulmonary Hypertension, Tadalafil, Adcirca, Letairis, Respiratory Failure, Ambrisentan

Risk to Baby From Antidepressant Use in Pregnancy Is Small, Study Says

Posted 2 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 2, 2015 – Babies born to mothers taking antidepressants in late pregnancy may be slightly more likely to develop a rare circulation disorder, a new study suggests. However, the increased risk of the disorder – known as persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) – is small, and similar to the risk in women with untreated depression. "Although we cannot exclude the possibility that there might be an increased risk of PPHN associated with SSRI [antidepressant] use late in pregnancy, our study has shown that the absolute risk is small," said lead author Krista Huybrechts. She is an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and an epidemiologist at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. The absolute risk refers to the actual number of infants born with the condition. "The risk increase, if present, appears much more modest than previous studies ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Lexapro, Zoloft, Prozac, Celexa, Citalopram, Paxil, Major Depressive Disorder, Sertraline, Fluoxetine, Escitalopram, Paroxetine, Luvox, Pulmonary Hypertension, Fluvoxamine, Paxil CR, Sarafem, Luvox CR, Brisdelle, Pexeva

FDA Medwatch Alert: Revatio (sildenafil): Drug Safety Communication - FDA Clarifies Warning About Pediatric Use for Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

Posted 31 Mar 2014 by Drugs.com

ISSUE: FDA is clarifying its previous recommendation related to prescribing Revatio (sildenafil) for children with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Revatio is FDA-approved only to treat PAH in adults, not in children; however, health care professionals must consider whether the benefits of treatment with the drug are likely to outweigh its potential risks for each patient. FDA revised the Revatio drug label in August 2012, adding a warning stating that “use of Revatio, particularly chronic use, is not recommended in children.” This recommendation was based on an observation of increasing mortality with increasing Revatio doses in a long-term clinical trial in pediatric patients with PAH. FDA issued a Drug Safety Communication at that time. There may be situations in which the benefit-risk profile of Revatio may be acceptable in individual children, for example, when other tre ... Read more

Related support groups: Sildenafil, Pulmonary Hypertension, Revatio

Adempas Approved to Treat Pulmonary Hypertension

Posted 9 Oct 2013 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 9 – Adempas (riociguat) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat two types of pulmonary hypertension, characterized by high blood pressure in the arteries of the lungs. The chronic, disabling disease forces the heart to work harder than usual, and can lead to death or the need for a lung transplant, the FDA said in a news release. Adempas, among a class of drugs called soluble guanylate cyclase stimulators, relaxes the arteries. This increases blood flow and eases blood pressure, the agency said. The drug was approved for people with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) after surgery, or for people who cannot have surgery, to help improve the ability to exercise. The drug also was approved for people with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) of various causes. Adempas was evaluated in a clinical study involving 261 people ... Read more

Related support groups: Pulmonary Hypertension

FDA Approves Adempas to Treat Pulmonary Hypertension

Posted 8 Oct 2013 by Drugs.com

October 8, 2013 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Adempas (riociguat) to treat adults with two forms of pulmonary hypertension. Pulmonary hypertension is caused by abnormally high blood pressure in the arteries of the lungs. It makes the right side of the heart work harder than normal. In its various forms, pulmonary hypertension is a chronic, progressive, debilitating disease, often leading to death or need for lung transplantation. Adempas belongs to a class of drugs called soluble guanylate cyclase stimulators that help arteries relax to increase blood flow and decrease blood pressure. It is intended for patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) after surgery or patients who cannot undergo surgery, to improve their ability to exercise. Adempas is also indicated for patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) of unknown ... Read more

Related support groups: Pulmonary Hypertension

Study Yields Genetic Clue to Rare Lung Disease

Posted 26 Jul 2013 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 26 – A new genetic cause of a rare and fatal lung disease has been identified by U.S. researchers. The Columbia University Medical Center team found that mutations on the gene KCNK3 are linked to pulmonary arterial hypertension, which is high blood pressure in the lungs. The mutations in the gene appear to affect potassium channels in the pulmonary artery, a mechanism not previously linked to pulmonary arterial hypertension, according to the study published online July 25 in the New England Journal of Medicine. The researchers also found that the effects of the mutations in the KCNK3 gene could be reversed with a drug compound called a phospholipase inhibitor. "The most exciting thing about our study is not that we've identified a new gene involved in pulmonary hypertension, but that we've found a drug that can 'rescue' some mutations," study co-senior author Dr. Wendy ... Read more

Related support groups: Pulmonary Hypertension

Drug for Pulmonary Hypertension Shows 'Modest' Benefit in Studies

Posted 24 Jul 2013 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 24 – A new class of pulmonary hypertension drug is modestly effective in treating the disease and could provide an alternative for patients whose only option has been surgery, according to drug trial results. Results from phase 3 trials of Riociguat, published in the July 25 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, show that the drug can be used to treat two forms of pulmonary hypertension – pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTPH). Riociguat is the first in a new class of drugs known as soluble guanylate cyclase stimulators, which can help treat pulmonary hypertension by promoting the dilation of the pulmonary artery. Pulmonary hypertension is a condition in which there's increased pressure in arteries that carry blood from the heart to the lungs. Symptoms can include shortness of breath or fainting during ... Read more

Related support groups: Pulmonary Hypertension

FDA Medwatch Alert: Revatio (sildenafil): Drug Safety Communication - Recommendation Against Use in Children

Posted 30 Aug 2012 by Drugs.com

ISSUE: FDA notified healthcare professionals and their medical care organizations that Revatio (sildenafil) should not be prescribed to children (ages 1 through 17) for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH).This recommendation against use is based on a recent long-term clinical pediatric trial showing that: (1) children taking a high dose of Revatio had a higher risk of death than children taking a low dose and (2) the low doses of Revatio are not effective in improving exercise ability. Treatment of PAH in children with this drug is an off-label use (not approved by FDA) and a new warning, stating the use of Revatio is not recommended in pediatric patients has been added to the Revatio labeling. BACKGROUND: Revatio is a phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor used to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension by relaxing the blood vessels in the lungs to reduce blood pressure and is approved to ... Read more

Related support groups: Pulmonary Hypertension, Revatio

Viagra May Help Children With Rare Blood Pressure Disorder

Posted 25 Oct 2011 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 25 – New research suggests that the active ingredient in the erectile dysfunction drug Viagra, which was initially developed as a treatment for heart disease, could help children with a rare condition called pulmonary arterial hypertension. The drug, which is expensive to take regularly and has side effects, is already approved to treat the condition in adults. And some pediatricians use it to treat children, said Dr. Thomas Kulik, senior associate in cardiology at Children's Hospital Boston. But it has not yet received U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for that purpose. Pulmonary arterial hypertension, a rare condition, causes abnormally high blood pressure in the arteries that lead to the lungs. It can be inherited, accompany some forms of heart disease or occur for no known reason, Kulik said. The disease can limit the ability to exercise and lead to heart ... Read more

Related support groups: Viagra, Cialis, Sildenafil, Pulmonary Hypertension, Tadalafil, Revatio, Adcirca

New Uses Found for Old Drugs

Posted 17 Aug 2011 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 17 – Many drugs already approved to combat certain illnesses may also be helpful in treating a slew of other seemingly unrelated health problems, a new study indicates. Researchers from the Stanford University School of Medicine used computers to pair drugs with all illnesses for which they might be beneficial. They argued their findings make the case for drug repositioning – or the use of existing drugs to boost progress on the development of new treatments – for other serious conditions. One high-profile example of how a drug can be used to treat conditions for which it was not originally intended involves Viagra. This medication was first developed to treat heart problems. It turned out that Viagra is also effective in treating erectile dysfunction as well as a lung disorder called pulmonary hypertension. The researchers from Stanford, however, sought to predict ... Read more

Related support groups: Viagra, Topamax, Crohn's Disease, Topiramate, Sildenafil, Lung Cancer, Pulmonary Hypertension, Revatio, Tagamet, Cimetidine, Topamax Sprinkle, Tagamet HB, Topiragen

Standard Heart Drugs Won't Ease Pulmonary Hypertension

Posted 18 May 2011 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 18 – Although commonly used to treat heart disease, aspirin and simvastatin offer no benefit to patients suffering from pulmonary arterial hypertension, or PAH, a progressive disease characterized by increased blood pressure in the arteries of the lungs, according to new research. In a study funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health, researchers divided 65 patients into four groups: one receiving aspirin; one taking simvastatin; one receiving both drugs; and one in which patients received a placebo (or dummy pill). "Surprisingly, we found no evidence that aspirin or simvastatin had beneficial clinical effects in this population," said Dr. Steven Kawut, study lead author and associate professor of medicine and epidemiology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. After taking the assigned medication for six months, patients were asked to see how far ... Read more

Related support groups: Aspirin, Simvastatin, Zocor, Pulmonary Hypertension, Ecotrin, Bayer Aspirin, Bufferin, Aspergum, Buffered Aspirin, Fasprin, Low Dose ASA, Sloprin, Easprin, ZORprin, Aspir-Low, St Joseph Aspirin, Aspirin Low Strength, Bayer Plus, Genprin, Aspirin Lite Coat

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