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White Collar Workers at Higher Odds of Death From ALS, Parkinson's

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 13, 2017 – Typically, better-paying jobs and those that require higher education are thought more desirable, but a new study suggests white collar workers have a higher risk of death from two neurodegenerative diseases. The research found that richer, better-educated people with Parkinson's disease or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, also called Lou Gehrig's disease), appear more likely to die from these diseases than those in lower paying or less educationally demanding work. Workers in these "high socioeconomic" occupations include mathematicians, architects, engineers, lawyers and managers, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "This is kind of an unexpected finding," said lead author John Beard, a research officer at the CDC's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. Most prior studies have focused on ... Read more

Related support groups: Benadryl, Parkinson's Disease, Diphenhydramine, Mirapex, Requip, Ropinirole, Sinemet, Pramipexole, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Cogentin, Levodopa, Azilect, Cabergoline, Emsam, Benztropine, Bromocriptine, Carbidopa, Selegiline, Amantadine, Neupro

Early Parkinson's May Prompt Vision Problems

Posted 17 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 11, 2017 – Changes in vision may be an early sign of Parkinson's disease, researchers report. The neurodegenerative condition is caused by the loss of neurons in several brain structures, resulting in tremors, rigidity or stiffness, along with impaired balance and coordination, the Italian researchers explained. But, "although Parkinson's disease is primarily considered a motor disorder, several studies have shown non-motor symptoms are common across all stages of the disease," said lead researcher Dr. Alessandro Arrigo. He is a resident in ophthalmology at the University Vita-Salute San Raffaele of Milan. "However, these symptoms are often undiagnosed because patients are unaware of the link to the disease and, as a result, they may be undertreated," Arrigo added. Non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease patients include visual changes, such as an inability to perceive ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Parkinson's Disease, Dry Eye Disease, Parkinsonian Tremor, Parkinsonism, Visual Defect/Disturbance, Color Vision Defect (Acquired)

Parkinson's Disease and Melanoma May Occur Together, Study Finds

Posted 7 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 7, 2017 – People with Parkinson's disease are about four times more likely to develop melanoma skin cancer, and conversely, people with melanoma have a fourfold higher risk of getting Parkinson's, researchers report. Although doctors have known about the connection between these diseases, they still don't know why having one increases the risk of the other. "Future research should focus on identifying common genes, immune responses and environmental exposures that may link these two diseases," said study first author Dr. Lauren Dalvin, who's with the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. "If we can pinpoint the cause of the association between Parkinson's disease and melanoma, we will be better able to counsel patients and families about their risk of developing one disease in the setting of the other," she said in a Mayo news release. Parkinson's disease is a progressive brain ... Read more

Related support groups: Parkinson's Disease, Melanoma, Melanoma - Metastatic, Parkinsonian Tremor, Parkinsonism, Parkinson's Disease Psychosis

Study Hints at Link Between Some Statins, Parkinson's Risk

Posted 20 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 20, 2017 – People on cholesterol-lowering statins may have a slightly increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease, a new study suggests. Researchers said the finding doesn't prove statins are to blame. But, they added, the findings undercut the notion that statins might help protect against Parkinson's. Where does that idea come from? Past research has shown that people with high cholesterol tend to have a lower risk of Parkinson's, explained Dr. Xuemei Huang, a professor of neurology at Penn State College of Medicine. Since many of those people are treated with statins, that led to speculation that the drugs – rather than high cholesterol itself – might be protective. But so far, studies have come to mixed conclusions, according to Huang. Some have tied statins to a lower Parkinson's risk, while others have found either no connection or an increased risk. Enter ... Read more

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Does a Low-Fat Dairy Habit Boost Parkinson's Risk?

Posted 8 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 8, 2017 – Though you might think eating low-fat dairy foods is a healthy move, new research suggests the habit is tied to a slight rise in the risk of developing Parkinson's disease. Experts who reviewed the study stressed that the findings are preliminary – the effect was a modest one and the research wasn't designed to prove cause and effect. In the study, researchers analyzed data on about 130,000 men and women, tracking their dietary habits every four years and the number of people diagnosed with Parkinson's. After 25 years, more than 1,000 people developed Parkinson's, a progressive neurodegenerative illness affecting coordination and movement. Those who consumed at least three servings of low-fat dairy a day had a 34 percent higher risk of getting the disorder than those who only consumed one serving a day. Looking specifically at milk consumption, the researchers ... Read more

Related support groups: Parkinson's Disease, Dietary Supplementation, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation and Deficiency, Parkinsonian Tremor, Parkinsonism, Parkinson's Disease Psychosis

Black, Hispanic Americans Less Likely to See a Neurologist

Posted 18 May 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 17, 2017 – Black and Hispanic people are less likely than white people to make an appointment to see a neurologist, according to a new U.S. study. Researchers found that black people with conditions that affect the brain, such as Parkinson's disease and stroke, tend to be treated in the emergency room and end up in the hospital more often than their white peers. "Our findings demonstrate that there are substantial racial and ethnic disparities in neurologic health care access and utilization in the United States," said study author Dr. Altaf Saadi, from Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. "These disparities are concerning, not only because racial and ethnic minorities represent 28 percent of Americans, but because all Americans should have equitable access to health care regardless of who they are, where they live, or what resources ... Read more

Related support groups: Parkinson's Disease, Neurologic Disorder, Parkinsonian Tremor, Parkinsonism, Parkinson's Disease Psychosis, Head Imaging

Study Looks at Parkinson's Effect on Life Span

Posted 15 May 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 15, 2017 – People with brain diseases such as Parkinson's and dementia with Lewy bodies die about two years earlier compared with people who don't have these conditions, a new study suggests. The report provides new clues about the survival of patients with degenerative brain diseases, researchers at the Mayo Clinic said. "Our results may be helpful to guide clinicians counseling patients and caregivers," Dr. Rodolfo Savica and colleagues wrote in the report published May 15 in JAMA Neurology. The study initially looked at all residents of Minnesota's Olmsted County. The investigators then compared survival rates between 461 people with certain degenerative brain diseases and 452 healthy people in the general population. The study participants with degenerative brain diseases were diagnosed between 1991 and 2010. Just over 300 had Parkinson's disease; 55 had Parkinson's ... Read more

Related support groups: Parkinson's Disease, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Parkinsonian Tremor, Parkinsonism, Lewy Body Dementia, Parkinson's Disease Psychosis

Parkinson's Disease May Originate in Gut, Study Says

Posted 27 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 26, 2017 – New research suggests additional evidence that Parkinson's disease may originate in the gut. Though experts called the findings preliminary, Swedish scientists found that patients whose main trunk of the vagus nerve – which extends from the brain stem to the abdomen – was removed were markedly less likely to develop the movement disorder than others who didn't have the surgery. The patients were followed for at least five years. The study authors said the findings suggest Parkinson's may start in the gut and spread to the brain through the vagus nerve, which helps control unconscious body processes such as heart rate and digestion. "We were not largely surprised, as other research has also shown evidence for a link between the gut and Parkinson's disease," said study author Dr. Karin Wirdefeldt. She's an associate professor of medical epidemiology and ... Read more

Related support groups: Parkinson's Disease, Parkinsonian Tremor, Diagnosis and Investigation, Parkinsonism, Parkinson's Disease Psychosis

150-Year-Old Drug May Shorten 'Off' Time for Parkinson's Patients

Posted 21 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, April 21, 2017 – An old standby drug seems to help patients with advanced Parkinson's disease through the difficult times when their usual medication stops working, a new trial suggests. As the movement disorder progresses, the effectiveness of the usual drug, levodopa, wears off more quickly after each dose, the researchers explained. Patients can experience so-called "off" times, which can result in stiffness and leave them immobilized until the levodopa kicks in again. During these off times, the injectable drug apomorphine (Apokyn) can significantly shorten the period before levodopa takes over, the investigators found. "The results confirm what had been expected based on decades of clinical experience with apomorphine infusion in Europe," said lead researcher Dr. Regina Katzenschlager, a guest professor at the Medical University of Vienna in Austria. "When fluctuations in ... Read more

Related support groups: Parkinson's Disease, Sinemet, Levodopa, Carbidopa/Levodopa, Stalevo, Rytary, Sinemet CR, Parkinsonian Tremor, Stalevo 100, Parkinsonism, Stalevo 200, Parcopa, Carbidopa/Entacapone/Levodopa, APO-Go, Apokyn, Parkinson's Disease Psychosis, Atamet, Larodopa, Uprima, Duopa

Could a Zap to the Brain Jog Failing Memory?

Posted 20 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 20, 2017 – Can a slight charge of electricity improve an ailing memory? Maybe, according to new research from the University of Pennsylvania. Timed correctly, deep brain stimulation can help people whose memory is lapsing. The treatment can restore the normal flow of "traffic patterns" in the brain, the study authors said. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a procedure that provides a mild electrical stimulation to certain areas of the brain. It is commonly used in people with Parkinson's disease. In DBS, a wire to deliver the stimulation is placed in the brain. The device that generates the charge is usually implanted underneath the collarbone, according to the U.S. National Institutes of Health. "Technology based on this type of stimulation could produce meaningful gains in memory performance," one of the study authors, Daniel Rizzuto, director of cognitive ... Read more

Related support groups: Parkinson's Disease, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Diagnosis and Investigation, Lewy Body Dementia

Deep Brain Stimulation May Ease Tourette 'Tics'

Posted 11 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 11, 2017 – Some young people with severe cases of Tourette syndrome may benefit from having electrodes implanted in the brain, a small study suggests. The procedure, known as deep brain stimulation (DBS), has long been used to treat certain cases of Parkinson's disease and other brain-based disorders. But DBS is still considered experimental in the context of Tourette syndrome – a disorder that causes people to habitually make involuntary sounds or movements, commonly known as "tics." The new findings, published online April 7 in the Journal of Neurosurgery, add to evidence that DBS can help ease severe tics. The "hope" is that there will eventually be enough evidence for approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, said Dr. Alon Mogilner, the senior researcher on the study. In the United States, it's estimated that Tourette syndrome affects 0.6 percent of ... Read more

Related support groups: Parkinson's Disease, Tourette's Syndrome, Diagnosis and Investigation, Parkinsonism, Head Imaging

FDA Allows Marketing of First Direct-to-Consumer Tests that Provide Genetic Risk Information for Certain Conditions

Posted 7 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

April 6, 2017 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today allowed marketing of 23andMe Personal Genome Service Genetic Health Risk (GHR) tests for 10 diseases or conditions. These are the first direct-to-consumer (DTC) tests authorized by the FDA that provide information on an individual’s genetic predisposition to certain medical diseases or conditions, which may help to make decisions about lifestyle choices or to inform discussions with a health care professional. “Consumers can now have direct access to certain genetic risk information,” said Jeffrey Shuren, M.D., director of the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health. “But it is important that people understand that genetic risk is just one piece of the bigger puzzle, it does not mean they will or won’t ultimately develop a disease.” The GHR tests are intended to provide genetic risk information to consumers, but the ... Read more

Related support groups: Parkinson's Disease, Alzheimer's Disease, Dystonia, Celiac Disease, Alpha-1 Proteinase Inhibitor Deficiency, Diagnosis and Investigation

FDA OKs 1st At-Home Genetic Tests for 10 Disorders

Posted 6 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 6, 2017 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the first home genetic tests for 10 health risks, including Parkinson's disease and late-onset Alzheimer's. The approval – granted to the California-based company 23andMe Inc. – could help test users make lifestyle choices or spark important discussions with health care providers, the FDA said. "Consumers can now have direct access to certain genetic risk information," Dr. Jeffrey Shuren, director of the FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health, said Thursday in an agency news release. "But, it is important that people understand that genetic risk is just one piece of the bigger puzzle. It does not mean they will or won't ultimately develop a disease," he added. Along with genetics, many things can contribute to disease and illness, including lifestyle and environmental factors, the FDA said. The ... Read more

Related support groups: Parkinson's Disease, Alzheimer's Disease, Celiac Disease, Diagnosis and Investigation, Parkinsonism, Hemophilia, Gaucher Disease

Hepatitis Infection May Raise Risk for Parkinson's Disease

Posted 30 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 30, 2017 – People with the liver infection hepatitis may be at heightened risk of developing Parkinson's disease, a large new study suggests. The study, published online March 29 in Neurology, is the second in the past year to link hepatitis to Parkinson's. Specifically, the new study found that people who'd been infected with hepatitis B or C were 51 percent to 76 percent more likely to develop Parkinson's, compared to people who'd never had hepatitis. The researchers don't know why the connection exists. And the study cannot prove a cause-and-effect link. But the association between Parkinson's disease and hepatitis appears to be "strong," according to Dr. Michael Okun, national medical director of the Parkinson's Foundation. Last year, a study in Taiwan found that people with hepatitis C faced an increased risk of Parkinson's. Now the new findings, based on millions ... Read more

Related support groups: Hepatitis C, Parkinson's Disease, Hepatitis B, Parkinsonian Tremor, Parkinsonism, Exposure to Hepatitis B Virus

Exercising 2.5 Hours a Week May Slow Parkinson's Progression

Posted 29 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 29, 2017 – Parkinson's disease can cause tremors, stiffness and trouble with walking. But a new study suggests that regular exercise can slow the progression of the disease. Even those with advanced Parkinson's can benefit from activity, the study authors said. The research included more than 3,400 patients in North America, the Netherlands and Israel who were followed for more than two years. During that time, Parkinson's-related changes in mobility were assessed by timing how long it took patients to rise from a chair, walk about 10 feet, turn and return to a sitting position. The results were published online recently in the Journal of Parkinson's Disease. "We found that people with Parkinson's disease who maintained exercise 150 minutes per week had a smaller decline in quality of life and mobility over two years compared to people who did not exercise or exercised ... Read more

Related support groups: Parkinson's Disease, Parkinsonian Tremor, Parkinsonism, Parkinson's Disease Psychosis

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