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Nephropathy News

Are Doctors Discarding Donor Kidneys That Could Save Lives?

Posted 14 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 6, 2017 – U.S. doctors are discarding donated kidneys that could keep people alive for years, simply because the organs are not top-quality, a new study claims. "Suboptimal" kidneys from older donors with health problems perform much better than expected, and would preserve a patient's life much longer than dialysis, said lead researcher Dr. Sumit Mohan, an assistant professor at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. About 73 percent of lower-quality kidneys received by Columbia patients were still functioning five years after transplant, Mohan and his colleagues found. "To our surprise, yes, they did worse than the best-quality kidneys, but they didn't do that poorly," Mohan said. By comparison, the five-year survival rate for kidney patients on dialysis is about 35 percent, Mohan said. "If I don't get a kidney, my alternative is to stay on dialysis," ... Read more

Related support groups: Renal Failure, Renal Transplant, Chronic Kidney Disease, Peritoneal dialysis, Organ Transplant, Kidney Transplant, Organ Transplant - Rejection Reversal, Nephropathy, Rejection Prophylaxis, Rejection Reversal, Renal and Genitourinary Disorders, Hyperphosphatemia of Renal Failure

Elevated Protein Level Increases Blacks' Risk of Kidney Disease

Posted 27 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 27, 2017 – Black Americans with gene variants that raise their risk of chronic kidney disease don't always develop it, and researchers now think they know why. Fifteen to 20 percent of black Americans have inherited variations of the apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1) that put them at risk for chronic kidney disease, but only about half of them are diagnosed with the illness. Scientists analyzed blood samples from more than 1,000 black Americans who had the genetic risk. They found that elevated levels of a protein called suPAR triggered the start and progression of chronic kidney disease in those with the gene variants. "What we are learning today is that suPAR ... is to kidneys what cholesterol is to the heart, a substance that can cause damage if levels rise too high, or a substance that can likely make many forms of kidney disease worse," said senior study author Dr. Jochen ... Read more

Related support groups: Renal Failure, Chronic Kidney Disease, Diagnosis and Investigation, Nephropathy, Renal and Genitourinary Disorders

Smoking Harms Black Americans' Kidneys, Study Suggests

Posted 25 May 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 25, 2016 – Smoking may pose a significant risk to kidney health for black Americans, new research suggests. The study included more than 3,600 black adults, aged 21 to 84, from Jackson, Miss., and the surrounding area. The researchers followed their health for 12 years. During that time, the researchers found that, overall, study participants who were current smokers had an 83 percent greater decline in kidney function than those who never smoked. The more a person smoked, the greater their rate of kidney decline, the findings showed. People who smoked up to 19 cigarettes a day had a 75 percent greater decline in kidney function. People who had 20 or more cigarettes a day had a 97 percent greater decline in kidney function, the study found. Though the study wasn't designed to prove cause-and-effect, the researchers said that current smokers had 38 percent higher ... Read more

Related support groups: Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Renal Failure, Chronic Kidney Disease, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Anemia Associated with Chronic Renal Failure, Nephropathy, Renal and Genitourinary Disorders

Poor Sleep Might Harm Kidneys, Study Suggests

Posted 5 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 5, 2015 – Lack of sleep may be a gateway to kidney disease, at least for women, a new study suggests. Researchers from Boston's Brigham and Women's Hospital evaluated the sleep habits of thousands of women and found too little shuteye was tied to a more rapid decline in kidney function. Women who slept five hours or less a night had a 65 percent greater risk of rapid decline in kidney function, compared with women sleeping seven to eight hours a night, the investigators discovered. "This is concerning because as a general population the amount of sleep we are getting has decreased over the last 20 years," said lead researcher Dr. Ciaran McMullan, an instructor in medicine. Americans used to sleep an average of eight hours a night, but now it's about 6.5 hours and decreasing, he said. It's not known whether sleeping longer improves kidney function or reverses damage ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Renal Failure, Sleep Apnea, Chronic Kidney Disease, Nephropathy, Renal and Genitourinary Disorders

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