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Related terms: Vomiting/Nausea, Nausea, Upset Stomach, Stomach Upset, Throwing Up, Puking

9 of 10 Docs Unprepared to Prescribe Marijuana

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 19, 2017 – Although it's becoming more commonplace, medical marijuana is rarely discussed in U.S. medical schools, a new study shows. "Medical education needs to catch up to marijuana legislation," said senior author Dr. Laura Jean Bierut, a professor of psychiatry at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. "Physicians in training need to know the benefits and drawbacks associated with medical marijuana so they know when or if, and to whom, to prescribe the drug," she explained in a school news release. Marijuana is now legal – at least for medical purposes – in more than half the states in the country, the researchers said. Curriculum deans at 101 medical schools completed surveys about marijuana education. Just over two-thirds said their graduates weren't prepared to prescribe medical marijuana. One-quarter said their graduates weren't even able to ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Nausea/Vomiting, Nausea/Vomiting - Chemotherapy Induced, Cannabis, Nausea/Vomiting - Radiation Induced

Health Tip: Avoid Motion Sickness

Posted 23 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Motion sickness is a common byproduct of summer travel. But with some preparation, it can be prevented. "Motion sickness occurs when the brain receives conflicting signals from the motion-sensing parts of the body: the inner ears, the eyes, and nerves in the extremities," the American Academy of Pediatrics says on its healthychildren.org website. The primary symptoms are dizziness and an upset stomach that may lead to vomiting. Here's what you can do to help prevent motion sickness, the academy says: Do not travel on an empty stomach. Eat a small snack to relieve hunger. Avoid dairy or anything heavy. Instead, opt for crackers or something light. Distract yourself by talking or listening to music. Focus on the horizon outside the car. Avoid books, iPads and other mobile devices while the car is moving. Medications such as Dramamine may ease dizziness and nausea, but they may have ... Read more

Related support groups: Nausea/Vomiting, Vomiting, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Loratadine, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, Vistaril, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Periactin, Xyzal, Chlorpheniramine, Motion Sickness

Managing Motion Sickness

Posted 30 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 30, 2017 – Your friends are excited to ride that monster roller coaster, but just looking at it makes you queasy. Is there anything you can do to quell your motion sickness so you can join in the fun? If you suffer from motion sickness, there are some ways to deal with it, one doctor says, though riding roller coasters isn't likely an activity you'll ever love. Motion sickness can occur in cars, on planes, boats, trains and amusement park rides, and even when sitting too close to a movie theater screen or using a virtual reality device. Motion sickness occurs when the brain gets mixed information. The brain combines input from the eyes with information from the parts of the body touching the ground, and then links that information with the vestibular system in the ears that controls balance. If these things don't match up, motion sickness can occur. "Some people can feel ... Read more

Related support groups: Nausea/Vomiting, Ativan, Lorazepam, Benadryl, Promethazine, Diphenhydramine, Zofran, Phenergan, Meclizine, Reglan, Ondansetron, Marinol, Dramamine, Metoclopramide, Motion Sickness, Compazine, Perphenazine, Prochlorperazine, Scopolamine, Thorazine

Germs, Mold Found in Some Medical Pot

Posted 15 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 15, 2017 – Medical marijuana carries infectious bacteria and fungi that can pose a life-threatening risk to cancer patients who use pot to help with side effects of chemotherapy, a new study suggests. The study was initially prompted by the death of a man using medical marijuana to combat the side effects of cancer treatment. His death was believed to be caused by a fungus from his marijuana, his doctor said. Study researchers tested 20 different samples of dried marijuana obtained from Northern California dispensaries and found several potentially dangerous pathogens in the samples. The germs found by the researchers wouldn't harm an average pot user, but could be potentially fatal to people whose immune systems have been suppressed, said lead researcher Dr. George Thompson III. "We found basically everything that, if you're really immunosuppressed, you don't want," ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Infections, Nausea/Vomiting, Cancer, Chronic Pain, Bacterial Infection, Vomiting, Fungal Infections, Nausea/Vomiting - Chemotherapy Induced, Cannabis, Nausea/Vomiting - Postoperative, Nausea/Vomiting - Radiation Induced, Mucormycosis, Invasive

What to Do If You Think You're Having a Heart Attack

Posted 3 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Feb. 3, 2017 – Would you be able to recognize the urgent symptoms of a heart attack – and know how to respond to it? The heart-related deaths of such celebrities as "Star Wars" actress Carrie Fisher, singer-songwriter George Michael and actor Bernard Fox are a powerful reminder that everyone should know the symptoms of serious heart problems, the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) said. People need to take potential heart attack symptoms seriously and immediately call 911 or get to the nearest emergency department. According to the ACEP, the most common symptoms of heart attack are: Uncomfortable pressure, fullness, squeezing or pain in the center of the chest that lasts more than a few minutes, or goes away and returns, Pain that spreads to the shoulders, neck, jaw, arms or back, Chest discomfort along with lightheadedness, fainting, sweating, nausea or ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Nausea/Vomiting, Lisinopril, Heart Disease, Losartan, Heart Attack, Benicar, Diovan, Ramipril, Dyspnea, Cozaar, Valsartan, Micardis, Enalapril, Benazepril, Avapro, Atacand, Nitroglycerin, Irbesartan, Imdur

Many Breast Cancer Survivors Don't Get Life-Extending Therapy

Posted 2 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 2, 2017 – Hormonal therapies such as tamoxifen, or a class of drugs called aromatase inhibitors, can reduce the likelihood that women diagnosed with certain breast cancers will experience a recurrence of their disease. However, a new study finds these treatments – used in breast cancers that are responsive to hormones such as estrogen – are too seldom utilized or often used incorrectly. According to the research team, if all U.S. breast cancer survivors who needed them followed recommendations for hormone therapy, that could mean almost 15,000 lives saved over a decade. Unfortunately, these drugs are "still underused, and in some cases, misused – offered to patients who lack [estrogen] hormone receptors" on their tumor cells, explained study senior author Dr. Dezheng Huo. He's associate professor of public health sciences at the University of Chicago. As the ... Read more

Related support groups: Nausea/Vomiting, Hot Flashes, Breast Cancer, Tamoxifen, Arimidex, Femara, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Anastrozole, Letrozole, Aromasin, Exemestane, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Breast Cancer - Palliative, Tamoxifen Hexal, Emblon, Tamoxen, Genox, Teslac, Testolactone, Nolvadex D

Health Tip: Feeling Under the Weather?

Posted 20 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Even if you're sick with a cold or the flu, don't neglect your teeth, the American Dental Association reminds us. The group offers these suggestions: Don't ever share your toothbrush, especially if you've been sick. It's usually not necessary to get a new toothbrush after you've been sick, unless you have a weak immune system or it's time to toss your brush anyway. If you're using cough drops, opt for sugar free. If you vomit, don't brush your teeth immediately afterward. Instead, swish with water or diluted mouthwash. Drink plenty of water to avoid dry mouth, which could harm teeth. Read more

Related support groups: Nausea/Vomiting, Vomiting, Influenza, Cold Symptoms, Pseudoephedrine, Sore Throat, Flonase, Phenylephrine, Nasonex, Afrin, Nasacort, Ephedrine, Veramyst, Oxymetazoline, Viral Infection, Astelin, Azelastine, Omnaris, Phenylpropanolamine, Dymista

Vomiting Disorder on Rise in Weed-Friendly Colorado

Posted 6 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 5, 2017 – Long-term heavy marijuana use can cause chronic vomiting and abdominal pain in some people, new research suggests. And the syndrome could become more frequent and pervasive as more states legalize use of the drug, according to health experts. Cases of the disorder, which is called cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome (CHS), doubled in Colorado as access to legal marijuana became widespread, said Dr. Kennon Heard. He is chief of medical toxicology for the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. "All of the emergency departments in the state now are seeing this on a daily to weekly basis," Heard said. "There are a lot of patients ending up in the emergency room with this, and presumably there are even more who don't come to the emergency room, who just ride it out at home." Patients who develop the syndrome typically smoke marijuana on a daily basis, and have ... Read more

Related support groups: Nausea/Vomiting, Vomiting, Gastrointestinal Disorders, Nausea/Vomiting - Chemotherapy Induced, Motion Sickness, Cannabis, Nausea/Vomiting - Postoperative, Nausea/Vomiting of Pregnancy

'Female Libido' Pill May Not Be Worth It: Researchers

Posted 29 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 29, 2016 – The much-touted "female libido" pill seems to cause a host of serious side effects while failing to spark much additional passion in a woman's life, a new review suggests. Addyi (flibanserin) quadruples the risk of dizziness and sleepiness, more than doubles the chances of nausea, and increases the risk of fatigue by more than half, according to the analysis. For all that trouble, a woman taking Addyi can expect to gain one-half of one additional satisfying sexual event per month, on average, according to the report. It was published online Feb. 29 in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine. "We found women had, on average, 2.5 satisfying sexual events per month before entering the study, and flibanserin added one-half additional satisfying sexual events per month," said senior study author Ellen Laan, a professor of sexology and psychosomatic gynecology at the ... Read more

Related support groups: Nausea/Vomiting, Sleep Disorders, Fatigue, Sexual Deviations or Disorders, Addyi, Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder, Flibanserin

FDA Medwatch Alert: Metoclopramide Injection And Ondansetron Injection by Hospira: Recall - Glass Strand Particulates Caused By Glass Supplier

Posted 3 Oct 2013 by Drugs.com

ISSUE: Hospira, Inc. announced it initiated a voluntary nationwide recall of one lot of Metoclopramide Injection, USP, 10 mg/2 mL (5 mg/mL)and two lots of Ondansetron Injection, USP, 4 mg/2 mL, (2 mg/mL). This action is due to a confirmed vial defect where glass particulate matter (glass strands) were identified as being affixed to the inside of the vial walls. There is potential for the glass particulates to dislodge into the solution. To date, Hospira has not received reports of any adverse events associated with this issue for these lots. BACKGROUND: Metoclopramide Injection, USP, 10 mg/2 mL (5 mg/mL), NDC 0409-3414-01, Lot 28-104-DK (the lot number may be followed by a 01), is packaged in a 2 mL single-dose fliptop vial, with an expiration date of October 1, 2014. Ondansetron Injection, USP, 4 mg/2 mL (2 mg/mL), NDC 0409-4755-03, Lots 29-484-DK and 29-510-DK (the lot numbers may be f ... Read more

Related support groups: Nausea/Vomiting, Zofran, Reglan, Ondansetron, Metoclopramide, Zofran ODT, Maxolon, Zuplenz

FDA Approves Diclegis for Pregnant Women Experiencing Nausea and Vomiting

Posted 9 Apr 2013 by Drugs.com

April 8, 2013 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Diclegis (doxylamine succinate and pyridoxine hydrochloride) to treat pregnant women experiencing nausea and vomiting. Diclegis is a delayed-release tablet intended for women who have not adequately responded to conservative management of nausea and vomiting during pregnancy, such as dietary and lifestyle modifications. These modifications include eating several small meals instead of three large meals, eating bland foods that are low in fat and easy to digest and avoiding smells that can trigger nausea. “Many women experience nausea and vomiting during pregnancy, and sometimes these symptoms are not adequately managed through recommended changes in diet and lifestyle,” said Hylton V. Joffe, M.D., M.M.Sc., director of the Division of Reproductive and Urologic Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Res ... Read more

Related support groups: Nausea/Vomiting, Doxylamine, Pyridoxine, Nausea

Diclegis Approved for Morning Sickness

Posted 9 Apr 2013 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 9 – Diclegis (doxylamine succinate and pyridoxine hydrochloride) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat nausea and vomiting associated with "morning sickness" during pregnancy. The drug was sanctioned for pregnant women who haven't responded to other therapies, such as eating smaller meals, eating lower-fat foods and avoiding smells that can prompt nausea, the agency said in a media release. Diclegis was evaluated in 261 adult women with morning sickness who had been pregnant between seven and 14 weeks. Women who took the drug had less nausea and vomiting than those who took a placebo. Studies also showed the drug didn't pose a threat to the fetus, the FDA said. The most common side effect of the drug – with a typical once-daily dose of two pills – was potentially severe drowsiness. Women who take Diclegis should avoid driving or operating ... Read more

Related support groups: Nausea/Vomiting, Doxylamine, Pyridoxine

FDA Allows Return of Once-Banned Morning Sickness Pill

Posted 9 Apr 2013 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 9 – A morning-sickness medication that was banned 30 years ago has won U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval under a new name. In its new form, the drug – formerly called Bendectin and now renamed Diclegis – is the only medication specifically approved to treat the stomach upset many women suffer from during pregnancy. In the intervening decades between the drug's withdrawal from the market and its re-approval on Tuesday, the medicine has undergone rigorous scrutiny and is now deemed safe by the FDA. Obstetricians welcomed the announcement. "The nausea and vomiting of early pregnancy can range from mild to debilitating," said Dr. Jennifer Wu, an obstetrician-gynecologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. "Patients will welcome more options for treatment with the reintroduction of Bendectin." Their nausea may not disappear completely, but "it will hopefully ... Read more

Related support groups: Nausea/Vomiting, Doxylamine, Pyridoxine

No Risks to Pregnancy Seen With Morning Sickness Drug

Posted 27 Feb 2013 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 27 – A drug commonly used to treat severe cases of morning sickness does not appear to be linked to birth defects or other risks to the baby, a large new study suggests. The Danish researchers said the findings, reported in the Feb. 28 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, do not prove the medication is risk-free. But they said the study should reassure women who need the drug, called ondansetron (Zofran and generics). "We can never say it's 100 percent safe," said Christina Chambers, co-director of the Center for Promotion of Maternal Health and Infant Development at the University of California, San Diego. "But this is a good study that really adds to what we've known," said Chambers, who was not involved in the work. The findings are based on records from more than 600,000 Danish women who were pregnant between 2004 and 2011. Of those women, about 0.3 percent ... Read more

Related support groups: Nausea/Vomiting, Zofran, Ondansetron, Zofran ODT, Zuplenz

Palliative Care Eases Suffering for Seniors at End of Life: Study

Posted 20 Dec 2012 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 20 – Palliative care improved the quality of life for seniors in long-term care, according to a new study. Specifically, it led to a significant reduction in emergency room visits and depression among the elderly patients, said the researchers at Hebrew SeniorLife's Hebrew Rehabilitation Center and Institute for Aging Research, an affiliate of Harvard Medical School in Boston. Palliative care is meant to reduce symptoms – such as pain, nausea and fatigue – in patients with serious illnesses. These findings show palliative care's potential for improving the quality of end-of-life care for people in long-term care, the researchers said. Their two-year study included 250 elderly long-term care patients, half of whom received palliative care. Recipients had about half as many emergency room visits and were much less likely to suffer depression, compared to those who didn't ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Nausea/Vomiting

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