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Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis News

Health Tip: Exercising With Arthritis

Posted 9 days ago by Drugs.com

-- Exercise usually is good for those with arthritis, but there are many potential obstacles to keep you inactive. Here are strategies to keep you moving, courtesy of the Arthritis Foundation: No time? Exercise in short bursts, even just 10 minutes at a time. Find a fitness partner to help keep it fun. If you're having pain, try a low-impact exercise, such as swimming. Exercise even when you're tired, as regular exercise helps boost energy. Don't look at exercise as just a way to lose weight. It also helps manage pain, increase flexibility and makes it easier to do daily tasks. Look for a new gym if you feel self-conscious at the current one. If money is a concern, just go for a walk or buy inexpensive home workout equipment. Try interval training, a few minutes of vigorous exercise followed by a recovery period, if you're not seeing changes. Visit a personal trainer. Schedule workouts ... Read more

Related support groups: Rheumatoid Arthritis, Osteoarthritis, Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis, Still's Disease, Rheumatoid Lung

Moms' Rheumatoid Arthritis May Be Linked to Epilepsy Risk in Kids

Posted 16 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 16, 2016 – Some children born to mothers with rheumatoid arthritis may have higher-than-average odds of developing epilepsy, a new study suggests. Children born to mothers with rheumatoid arthritis were one-third more likely to develop epilepsy by age 4 than other children. The risk of epilepsy later in childhood was one-quarter higher for those born to moms with rheumatoid arthritis, the study found. But, experts stressed that the findings don't prove that a mother's rheumatoid arthritis causes epilepsy. So far, only an association has been found. And even if children of women with rheumatoid arthritis have a higher epilepsy risk than other kids do, the odds are still low. In the study of nearly 2 million children, the vast majority of those born to moms with rheumatoid arthritis did not develop epilepsy, said lead researcher Ane Lilleore Rom, of Copenhagen University ... Read more

Related support groups: Rheumatoid Arthritis, Seizures, Epilepsy, Seizure Prevention, Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis, Seizure Prophylaxis, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis, Still's Disease, Diagnosis and Investigation, Rheumatoid Lung, Felty's Syndrome

Having Rheumatoid Arthritis May Increase Heart Risk

Posted 15 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 15, 2016 – People with rheumatoid arthritis may have an increased risk for a heart attack, stroke and other heart disease-related problems, a new study suggests. Researchers examined data from 353 rheumatoid arthritis patients in the Netherlands who were followed for up to 15 years. The rate of heart disease-related events in these patients was more than twice that of the general population, the findings showed. The rate among rheumatoid arthritis patients was similar to that of people with type 2 diabetes. The risk among rheumatoid arthritis patients remained as much as 70 percent higher than the general population even after the researchers adjusted for known heart disease risk factors, according to the report authors. But, the study didn't prove a cause-and-effect relationship. The research was only designed to show that rheumatoid arthritis was associated with heart ... Read more

Related support groups: Rheumatoid Arthritis, Ischemic Stroke, Heart Attack, Transient Ischemic Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis, Still's Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Felty's Syndrome

Amjevita OK'd to Treat Inflammatory Diseases

Posted 27 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 26, 2016 – Amjevita (adalimumab-atto) – a biosimilar drug similar to the popular anti-inflammatory drug Humira – has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Amjevita has been approved for moderate-to-severe rheumatoid arthritis; psoriatic arthritis; ankylosing spondylitis (an arthritis that affects the spine); Crohn's disease; ulcerative colitis; plaque psoriasis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis, the FDA said in a news release. Biological drugs are generally derived from a living organism and can come from many sources, including humans, animals, microorganisms or yeast, the FDA said. A biosimilar drug is a biological product that's sanctioned after its maker proves it is "highly similar" to an already-approved biologic drug. The manufacturer of the biosimilar drug must prove that the product has "no clinically meaningful differences" in safety, purity ... Read more

Related support groups: Rheumatoid Arthritis, Humira, Crohn's Disease, Psoriatic Arthritis, Ulcerative Colitis, Ankylosing Spondylitis, Crohn's Disease - Maintenance, Ulcerative Colitis - Active, Plaque Psoriasis, Crohn's Disease - Acute, Ulcerative Colitis - Maintenance, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis, Adalimumab, Amjevita

Health Tip: Traveling With Arthritis

Posted 9 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Arthritis doesn't have to ruin your vacation. Here are relief suggestions from the Arthritis Foundation: Book a plane seat with extra room to stretch. Fly in the middle of the week when it's less busy. Ask for a hotel room that's on the first floor or near an elevator. Pack a cane or an extra pillow to help you stay comfortable. Pack a stash of healthier snacks. Pack medications in your carry-on baggage. Make sure meds are packed properly, especially if they need refrigeration. Pack a heating pad or wrap, an ice pack and topical creams. Opt for a hotel with a hot tub or steam room. Request assistance at the airport to prevent long walks or long periods standing. Ask another passenger for help storing carry-on luggage. Move around the plane's cabin as frequently as possible. Read more

Related support groups: Rheumatoid Arthritis, Osteoarthritis, Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis, Still's Disease, Rheumatoid Lung, Felty's Syndrome

FDA Approves Erelzi (etanercept-szzs), a Biosimilar to Enbrel

Posted 1 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

August 30, 2016 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Erelzi, (etanercept-szzs) for multiple inflammatory diseases. Erelzi is a biosimilar to Enbrel (etanercept), which was originally licensed in 1998. Erelzi is administered by injection for the treatment of: moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis, either as a standalone therapy or in combination with methotrexate (MTX); moderate to severe polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis in patients ages two and older; active psoriatic arthritis, including use in combination with MTX in psoriatic arthritis patients who do not respond adequately to MTX alone; active ankylosing spondylitis (an arthritis that affects the spine); and chronic moderate to severe plaque psoriasis in adult patients (18 years or older) who are candidates for systemic therapy or phototherapy. Health care professionals should review the prescribing ... Read more

Related support groups: Rheumatoid Arthritis, Enbrel, Psoriatic Arthritis, Ankylosing Spondylitis, Plaque Psoriasis, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis, Etanercept, Erelzi

FDA Approves New Biological Drug for Rheumatoid Arthritis

Posted 31 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 31, 2016 – A new biological drug to treat rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory diseases has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The drug Erelzi (etanercept-szzs) is a "biosimilar" to Enbrel (etanercept), which was approved by the FDA in 1998. A biosimilar is a biological product approved on findings that it is highly similar to an already-approved biological product and has no clinically meaningful differences in terms of safety and effectiveness, according to the FDA. It is similar to generic drugs in that it typically costs less than the original biological product. Biological products are typically derived from a living organism and include many sources, including humans, animals, microorganisms or yeast. "The biosimilar pathway is an important mechanism to improve access to treatment for patients with rheumatic and autoimmune diseases," ... Read more

Related support groups: Rheumatoid Arthritis, Enbrel, Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis, Still's Disease, Etanercept, Rheumatoid Lung, Erelzi, Felty's Syndrome

Health Tip: Use Cold Therapy to Ease Arthritis

Posted 10 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

-- If you're struggling with arthritis, cold therapy can help ease swelling and pain. Here's how to apply cold therapy, courtesy of the Arthritis Foundation: Use an ice pack, a plastic bag filled with ice or even a bag of frozen veggies. Wrap the pack in a towel and apply it to the area for a maximum of 20 minutes at a time. Buy a commercial ice pack, which can wrap around a joint and is less likely to leak. Submerge a painful joint in a bath of ice and cold water. Read more

Related support groups: Rheumatoid Arthritis, Osteoarthritis, Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis, Felty's Syndrome

New Treatments Helping Kids With Juvenile Arthritis

Posted 20 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 20, 2016 – New treatments for juvenile arthritis offer hope to children with the chronic autoimmune condition, doctors say. Scientists are still working to understand what causes juvenile arthritis and how to stop its progression. But, kids coping with its effects have reason to be optimistic, according to Dr. Nikolay Nikolov, a rheumatologist and clinical team leader at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. "We don't have a cure for juvenile arthritis – we're not there yet," Nikolov said in an FDA news release. "But we're making progress." But it's important to note that the drugs aren't risk-free. Juvenile arthritis is one of the most common chronic childhood conditions, affecting nearly 300,000 children in the United States, according to the FDA. The disease causes the immune system to attack its own tissues, resulting in pain, swelling, tenderness and stiffness in ... Read more

Related support groups: Rheumatoid Arthritis, Aspirin, Ibuprofen, Humira, Advil, Enbrel, Motrin, Excedrin, Vicoprofen, Aggrenox, Alka-Seltzer, Orencia, Fiorinal, Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis, Actemra, Excedrin Migraine, Advil PM, Ecotrin, Advil Cold and Sinus, Arthritis Pain

Health Tip: Recognizing Symptoms of Hand Arthritis

Posted 11 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Hand arthritis symptoms may be mild at first, but they can become more severe and make it difficult to grasp ordinary objects. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons mentions these typical symptoms: Pain that may feel burning or dull, and worsen after using the hand. Pain tends to ease with rest, and often is worse in the morning. Swelling or warmth of the joints. A grinding sensation in the joints. A feeling that the joints are looser than usual. Formation of cysts on the joints. Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Osteoarthritis, Fioricet, Excedrin, Tylenol PM, Fiorinal, Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis, Excedrin Migraine, Advil PM, Esgic, Headache Relief, Esgic-Plus, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis, Percogesic, Bupap, Excedrin Extra Strength, Acetaminophen/Butalbital/Caffeine, Dolgic Plus, Acetaminophen/Butalbital

Could Antibiotics Raise a Child's Risk for Juvenile Arthritis?

Posted 20 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 20, 2015 – Here's yet another reason not to overuse antibiotics: Children treated with the antibacterial drugs may face a greater risk for developing juvenile arthritis, new research suggests. The study found that children and teens prescribed antibiotics had about twice the risk of developing juvenile arthritis compared to children the same age who were not prescribed the drugs. "This risk was greatest within a year of receiving antibiotics and increased with the number of antibiotic courses children were prescribed," said study lead author Dr. Daniel Horton, a research fellow with the Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences Child Health Institute of New Jersey. Antifungal and antiviral drugs did not show the same effect, he said. The results suggest antibiotics may trigger juvenile arthritis in a small subset of children who are prone to developing this disease, Horton ... Read more

Related support groups: Metronidazole, Bactrim, Flagyl, Bactrim DS, Sulfamethoxazole/Trimethoprim, Xifaxan, Polymyxin B, Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis, Septra, Zyvox, Bacitracin, Rifaximin, Metro, SMZ-TMP DS, Septra DS, Chloramphenicol, Sulfatrim, Cotrimoxazole, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis, Flagyl IV

FDA Approves Rasuvo (methotrexate) Injection

Posted 14 Jul 2014 by Drugs.com

Chicago, IL, July 14, 2014 – Medac Pharma, Inc., a privately held pharmaceutical company focused on the development of new molecules and improving the effectiveness of existing medicines, announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Rasuvo, a subcutaneous injectable methotrexate (MTX) therapy delivered in an auto-injector for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), polyarticular-course juvenile idiopathic arthritis (pJIA) and psoriasis. Rasuvo will be available in 10 dosage strengths, ranging from 7.5 mg to 30 mg in 2.5 mg increments and will be launched in the U.S. The company concurrently announced that the U.S. District Court for the District of Delaware has denied a motion for a preliminary injunction filed by Antares Pharma, Inc. “We’re delighted to have secured approval for our lead product, Rasuvo, and look forward to introducing this much-needed therapy to the ma ... Read more

Related support groups: Rheumatoid Arthritis, Methotrexate, Psoriasis, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

Otrexup (Methotrexate) Injection Approved By FDA

Posted 15 Oct 2013 by Drugs.com

EWING, N.J., October 14, 2013 — Antares Pharma, Inc. today announced the approval of Otrexup (methotrexate) injection by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Otrexup is the first FDA approved subcutaneous (SC) methotrexate (MTX) for once weekly self-administration with an easy-to-use, single dose, disposable auto injector. Otrexup is indicated for adults with severe active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who have had an insufficient therapeutic response to or are intolerant of an adequate trial of first line therapy including full dose non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs), or children with active polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (pJIA). The FDA also approved adult use of Otrexup for symptomatic control of severe recalcitrant, disabling psoriasis that is not adequately responsive to other forms of therapy. In 2012, approximately six million prescriptions were w ... Read more

Related support groups: Rheumatoid Arthritis, Methotrexate, Psoriasis, Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

Ilaris Approved by FDA to Treat Active Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

Posted 12 May 2013 by Drugs.com

Basel, May 10, 2013 - Novartis announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Ilaris (canakinumab) for the treatment of active systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SJIA) in patients aged 2 years and older. Ilaris is the first interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) inhibitor approved for SJIA and the only treatment approved specifically for SJIA that is given as a once-monthly subcutaneous injection[1]. SJIA is a rare and disabling form of childhood arthritis characterized by spiking fever, rash and arthritis that can affect children as young as 2 years old and can continue into adulthood[2],[3]. This approval was based on two Phase III trials in SJIA patients, aged 2-19, showing significant improvement in the majority of Ilaris-treated patients[1]. Study 1 showed that 84% of patients treated with one subcutaneous dose of Ilaris achieved the primary endpoint of ... Read more

Related support groups: Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis, Ilaris, Canakinumab

FDA Approves Actemra for Children with Polyarticular Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

Posted 30 Apr 2013 by Drugs.com

BASEL, April 30, 2013 – Roche announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Actemra (tocilizumab) for the treatment of polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (PJIA). The medicine can be used in children two years of age and older with active disease. Actemra can be given alone or in combination with methotrexate (MTX) in people with PJIA. PJIA is a form of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), also known as juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, a chronic disease of childhood.1 JIA affects approximately 100 in every 100,000 children2 of which PJIA accounts for around 30 percent.3 PJIA is characterised by inflammation in five or more joints within the first six months of the disease and most commonly affects the small joints in the body such as the hands and feet.3 “Polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis is a rare debilitating condition in children that w ... Read more

Related support groups: Rheumatoid Arthritis, Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis, Actemra, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis, Tocilizumab, Arthritis, Juvenile Chronic Polyarthritis

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methotrexate, Humira, Enbrel, Remicade, Orencia, Actemra, infliximab, adalimumab, etanercept, view more... Ilaris, Amjevita, abatacept, tocilizumab, Erelzi, canakinumab, Otrexup, Rasuvo