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Hysterectomy News

Use of Cancer-Linked Fibroid Device Declines After FDA Warning

Posted 23 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 23, 2016 – The use of power morcellators – cutting tools used in minimally invasive gynecological procedures – has dropped significantly for hysterectomies since the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned against their use two years ago, a new study finds. Power morcellators have small blades that rotate rapidly. When used in minimally invasive hysterectomies or for the removal of noncancerous growths on the uterus known as fibroids, they slice the tissue into smaller pieces that are removed through a small opening in the abdomen. But tiny pieces of tissue can also spread to other areas of the body. And, sometimes, undetected cancers can be cut up with the healthy tissue. If that cancerous tissue isn't completely removed, those cells can cause cancer elsewhere. That's what prompted the FDA to issue its 2014 warning, the researchers explained. The new study looked only ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Cancer, Hysterectomy, Ovarian Cancer, Uterine Leiomyomata / Fibroids, Genitourinary Surgical and Other Conditions, Urinary Tract Cancer

FDA OKs 'Containment' Bag for Certain Uterine Surgeries

Posted 7 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 7, 2016 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday said it would permit limited use of a "tissue containment system" in conjunction with laparoscopic power morcellators – devices that grind up tissue in gynecological surgeries. But the FDA still warns against using laparoscopic power morcellators in most women because the procedure can spread undetected cancer cells. The device, called the PneumoLiner, will be permitted only when uterine tissue is not suspected to contain cancer, the agency said. And its maker must warn patients and doctors that the device has not been proven to reduce the risk of spreading cancer during these procedures. "The PneumoLiner is intended to contain morcellated tissue in the very limited patient population for whom power morcellation may be an appropriate therapeutic option – and only if patients have been appropriately informed ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Cancer, Abnormal Uterine Bleeding, Hysterectomy, Uterine Leiomyomata / Fibroids, Urinary Tract Cancer, Genitourinary Surgical and Other Conditions

Doctors Rally in Support of Fibroid Device Curbed by FDA

Posted 8 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 8, 2015 – Dozens of gynecologists, cancer doctors and women's health experts are challenging a U.S. Food and Drug Administration warning on a power device used to remove fibroid growths from a woman's uterus. The tool – a laparoscopic power morcellator – grinds up fibroid growths during minimally invasive surgery. The group of experts claim that curbing its use may force patients to undergo riskier, more invasive procedures. The FDA issued a "boxed warning" label on the devices last year. The agency had concluded that in about one out of every 458 cases, the morcellator chews up an undiagnosed cancerous growth and floods the woman's abdomen with cancer cells. But a review group of 46 experts says the FDA got its facts wrong. The likelihood that power morcellation would grind up a cancerous growth is actually much lower, they contend. "The best case scenario would be for ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Hysterectomy, Uterine Leiomyomata / Fibroids, Gastrointestinal Surgery, Genitourinary Surgical and Other Conditions

Hysterectomy at Younger Age Tied to Heart Disease Risks

Posted 5 Aug 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 5, 2015 – Hysterectomy is associated with an increased likelihood of cardiovascular risk factors and disease, especially among younger women, a new study suggests. Mayo Clinic researchers looked at data from more than 7,600 women. Half of the group had a hysterectomy, while the other half (the "control" group) didn't have the procedure. Women who had a hysterectomy before age 35 were much more likely to have a stroke than age-matched women in the control group, the investigators found. In addition, among women aged 35 to 40, high blood pressure was much more common among those in the hysterectomy group than those in the control group. Although the study found an association between menopause and cardiovascular problems, the study wasn't designed to prove a cause-and-effect relationship. The study was recently published in Menopause: The Journal of the North American ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Heart Disease, Hysterectomy, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders

Technique Used in Some Hysterectomies May Help Spread Cancer: Study

Posted 22 Jul 2014 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 22, 2014 – Removing the uterus with a minimally invasive procedure known as morcellation carries a risk of spreading undetected cancer, and now a new study pinpoints the likelihood more clearly. Twenty-seven of every 10,000 women who had the technique had undetected uterine cancer at the time of the procedure, researchers found, with the odds being highest for patients over the age of 65. Surgeons performing a hysterectomy with morcellation use a power cutter to slice uterine tissue into smaller fragments, and then remove those fragments through small incisions in the abdomen via a tube or laparoscope. "With this procedure, you are breaking up the uterus," said study researcher Dr. Jason Wright, chief of gynecologic oncology at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City. "You are essentially cutting through a cancer [if it is present] and ... Read more

Related support groups: Hysterectomy, Endometrial Cancer, Uterine Leiomyomata / Fibroids

Avoidance of Hormone Therapy May Have Harmed Hysterectomy Patients: Study

Posted 19 Jul 2013 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 18 – Widespread discontinuance of hormone replacement therapy in the past decade possibly contributed to the deaths of nearly 50,000 U.S. women who had had a hysterectomy, a new analysis contends. The findings refer only to women who've had a hysterectomy and then experience menopausal symptoms, the researchers emphasized. "In women who have had a hysterectomy who have symptoms of hormone deficiency [such as hot flashes], it can be lifesaving for them to take estrogen," said review author Dr. Philip Sarrel, of Yale University School of Medicine. For women between the ages of 50 and 59, estrogen-only therapy after a hysterectomy reduces the risk of heart attack and death, Sarrel said. "The main reduction [in deaths] is the reduction in heart attacks, but there is also a clear reduction in the incidence of breast cancer and deaths from breast cancer," Sarrel said. The use ... Read more

Related support groups: Estradiol, Hysterectomy, Premarin, Ethinyl Estradiol, Estrace, Vagifem, Estrace Vaginal Cream, Vivelle, Climara, Estring, Vivelle-Dot, Premarin Vaginal, Estradiol Patch, Minivelle, Evamist, Cenestin, Femring, Enjuvia, Estraderm, Ogen

Hysterectomy May Not Raise Heart Risks After All: Study

Posted 14 May 2013 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 14 – Women who have a hysterectomy are not in danger of increasing their risk of cardiovascular disease later in life, a new study says. Although earlier research had found higher chances of cardiovascular disease in the years following a hysterectomy, different criteria were used in this latest study, the researchers noted. "If women are contemplating hysterectomy, they don't need to be worried about increased cardiovascular risk," said study author Karen Matthews, a professor of epidemiology and psychology at the University of Pittsburgh. A hysterectomy is a surgical procedure that removes the uterus; sometimes the ovaries are also removed, to lower the risk of cancer. Previous studies found an increased risk for conditions such as coronary heart disease, stroke and heart failure in women who underwent a hysterectomy. Unlike other studies, however, the new research ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Hysterectomy, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

Robotic Surgery for Hysterectomy Often Not Best Option, Ob/Gyn Group Says

Posted 15 Mar 2013 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 15 – Despite claims to the contrary in "widespread marketing and advertising," expensive robotic surgery for hysterectomy is neither the only nor the best minimally invasive approach for the operation, according to a leading group representing obstetricians and gynecologists. "It is important to separate the marketing hype from the reality when considering the best surgical approach for hysterectomies," Dr. James Breeden, president of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), said in a statement released Thursday. He said the least invasive and cheapest method is vaginal hysterectomy, which involves going through a small opening at the top of the vagina, without any abdominal incisions. This approach has a low complication rate and is the procedure of choice when possible, according to ACOG. When vaginal hysterectomy is not possible, laparoscopic ... Read more

Related support groups: Hysterectomy

Removing Ovaries During Hysterectomy Won't Raise Other Health Risks: Study

Posted 29 Apr 2011 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 27 – Among women who have had a hysterectomy, those whose ovaries were also removed had a lower risk of subsequent ovarian cancer and no greater risks of heart disease, hip fractures or other types of cancer, a new study indicates. Using data gathered from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) study, the researchers analyzed more than 25,000 postmenopausal women aged 50 to 79 who underwent hysterectomies but had no family history of ovarian cancer. About 56 percent also had their ovaries removed during the procedure – the most common non-obstetric major surgery among American women – and 79 percent had used some form of hormone replacement therapy (HRT). The results contradicted those of the only other large study of its type, the Nurses' Health Study, which suggested a link between ovary removal and increased risks of heart disease, cancer deaths and overall ... Read more

Related support groups: Hysterectomy

Weight Linked to Complications in Some Hysterectomy Patients

Posted 6 Apr 2011 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 6 – Compared with normal weight women, obese women are more likely to experience bleeding and infections during and after a hysterectomy, a new study indicates. Researchers in Denmark analyzed data from 20,353 women who had a hysterectomy to treat non-cancerous conditions such as abnormal bleeding during menstruation, benign muscle tumors and pain. Women with a body-mass index (BMI) of 30 or more were three times more likely to experience heavy bleeding during surgery than normal weight women (BMI of 20 to 25). BMI is a measurement score that takes into account a person's height and weight. Obese women also had a one-third increased risk for all bleeding complications (bleeding either during or after surgery, or hematoma – where bleeding has occurred and collected) and a one-half increased risk of infection. Further investigation revealed that some of this increased ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Hysterectomy

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