Skip to Content

Join the 'Heart Attack' group to help and get support from people like you.

Heart Attack News

Heart Disease the No. 1 Killer Worldwide

Posted 5 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 17, 2017 – Roughly a third of all deaths around the world are the result of heart disease and stroke, making cardiovascular disease the number one killer globally, new research finds. Big declines in heart disease-driven fatalities in countries such as the United States, Canada, Australia, Japan, South Korea and many countries in Western Europe have started to level off over the past 20 years, investigators reported. "It is an alarming threat to global health," said study lead author Dr. Gregory Roth, an assistant professor of cardiology at the University of Washington School of Medicine. "Trends in cardiovascular disease mortality are no longer declining for high-income regions," he noted in an American College of Cardiology news release, "and low- and middle-income countries are also seeing more cardiovascular disease-related deaths." The study included 2,300 ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Smoking, Heart Disease, Ischemic Stroke, High Cholesterol, Heart Attack, Arrhythmia, Myocardial Infarction, Alcoholism, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Hangover, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Acute Alcohol Intoxication

Heart Attack Risk Spikes After Respiratory Infection, Study Finds

Posted 6 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 16, 2017 – The risk of heart attack increases sharply after a respiratory infection, a new study finds. But the absolute risk that any one episode will cause a heart attack is low, the Australian researchers added. The researchers looked at 578 people who suffered a heart attack and found that 17 percent had experienced symptoms of respiratory infection within seven days before the heart attack, and 21 percent within the prior month. The risk of a heart attack is 17 times higher in the week after a respiratory infection, the University of Sydney team concluded. In a second analysis, the researchers focused on upper-respiratory tract infections, such as the common cold, sore throat, hay fever and sinus infections. "For those participants who reported milder upper-respiratory tract infection symptoms, the risk increase was less, but was still elevated by 13-fold," study ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Sinusitis, Heart Attack, Tonsillitis/Pharyngitis, Cold Symptoms, Upper Respiratory Tract Infection, Sore Throat, Myocardial Infarction, Sinus Symptoms, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis

Many Under 40 May Not Need Regular Cholesterol Checks: Study

Posted 7 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 15, 2017 – Many adults under 40 may not need to have routine cholesterol screenings, a new study suggests. To come to this conclusion, the researchers looked at the real world implications of two conflicting sets of guidelines on cholesterol testing. One, from the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA), says that all adults older than 20 should have a cholesterol screening. They also suggest a repeat test every four to six years. The other guidelines come from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, a government-funded, independent panel of medical experts. They say many adults can go longer before their first cholesterol test – until age 35 for men, and age 45 for women. The exception would be people with a major risk factor for heart problems – such as high blood pressure, smoking or a family history of early heart disease. Those patients ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Obesity, Hypertension, Smoking, High Cholesterol, Heart Attack, Smoking Cessation, Myocardial Infarction, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Body Cooling May Help Brain After Cardiac Arrest

Posted 12 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 10, 2017 – Cooling the body may reduce the risk of brain damage for cardiac arrest patients in a coma, a leading group of U.S. neurologists says. The new guideline from the American Academy of Neurology recommends that families of these patients ask if their loved one qualifies for body cooling. "People who are in a coma after being resuscitated from cardiac arrest require complex neurologic and medical care, and neurologists can play a key role in improving outcomes by providing body cooling," said guideline committee chair Dr. Romergryko Geocadin. This guideline recommends that cooling be used more often for patients who qualify, said Geocadin, who is with Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore. In cardiac arrest, the heart suddenly stops beating. This means blood and oxygen no longer flow to the brain. The longer the heart goes without beating, the ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Diagnosis and Investigation, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome

Common Painkillers Tied to Slight Rise in Heart Attack Risk

Posted 13 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 9, 2017 – Commonly used painkillers such as Motrin, Advil and Aleve might increase your risk for heart attack, even in the first week of use, a new study suggests. Overall, these drugs and others known as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) increase the risk of a heart attack by 20 to 50 percent, compared with not using them, researchers found. For most people, however, this represents only a small increased risk – about 1 percent a year, the researchers said. Still, "from the viewpoint of public health, even small increases in risk of heart attack are important because use of NSAIDs is so widespread," said lead researcher Michele Bally. She's an epidemiologist at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Center. The increased risk of heart attack associated with NSAIDs was seen at any dose taken for one week, one month or more than one month. And the risk ... Read more

Related support groups: Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Heart Disease, Ischemic Stroke, Heart Attack, Celebrex, Advil, Diclofenac, Voltaren, Aleve, Voltaren Gel, Motrin, Transient Ischemic Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Vicoprofen, Flector, Flector Patch, Arthrotec, Naprosyn, Advil PM

Red Wine Antioxidant Might Help Diabetics' Arteries

Posted 18 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 4, 2017 – The antioxidant resveratrol – found in red wine, peanuts and berries – might improve the health of blood vessels in people with type 2 diabetes, a small study suggests. The study found that resveratrol supplements lessened artery stiffness in some people with type 2 diabetes. Stiffening of the arteries, called arteriosclerosis, raises the risk of heart attack and stroke. "In treatment with resveratrol among people with diabetes, there was a trend toward improvement in the stiffness. And in people with higher stiffness there was more of a benefit," said lead researcher Dr. Naomi Hamburg. She is chief of the vascular biology section at Boston University School of Medicine. While the research suggests there might be ways to improve blood vessel abnormalities in people with type 2 diabetes, it's too soon to recommend resveratrol for that purpose, said Hamburg. "We ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Ischemic Stroke, Heart Attack, Transient Ischemic Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Diabetes Mellitus, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Resveratrol, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis

Bystander CPR Not Only Saves Lives, It Lessens Disability: Study

Posted 18 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 4, 2017 – When someone goes into cardiac arrest, quick action from bystanders can have a long-lasting impact, researchers say. Not only were the patients more likely to survive, they were also significantly less likely to sustain brain damage or enter a nursing home in the following year, a new study found. It's well known that cardiac arrest victims have a better shot at surviving if witnesses jump into action, said lead researcher Dr. Kristian Kragholm. That means performing chest compressions or, if possible, using an automated external defibrillator (AED) – a layperson-friendly device that can "shock" a stopped heart back into rhythm. The new study findings, Kragholm noted, show those actions have long-term benefits, too. "Our study findings underscore the importance of learning how to recognize cardiac arrest, how to do chest compressions, and how to employ an AED," ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders, Cardiac Arrest, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Cardiogenic Shock, Post MI Syndrome

Health Tip: Coping With Hardening of the Arteries

Posted 19 days ago by Drugs.com

-- Hardening and narrowing of the arteries – medically called atherosclerosis – may require lifestyle changes to protect yourself from heart attack. Here's how to find support, courtesy of the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute: Tell your doctor if you feel depressed, anxious or stressed. If necessary, talk with a mental health professional. Reach out to your local hospital or health department for support and additional information. Discuss needed lifestyle changes with family and friends. Ask loved ones to help you make these changes. Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Atherosclerosis, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis

Too Many People Still Ignore Heart Attack Risks: Study

Posted 19 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 3, 2017 – Sizable numbers of adults with risk factors for heart attack – such as smoking, obesity or physical inactivity – aren't inclined to do anything to improve their health, a large, new study finds. Among those at greatest risk, meaning they having five or more risk factors, almost 1 in 5 did not feel they needed to make any changes, the study revealed. Researchers can't say exactly why this disconnect exists. "Our study suggests that the link between risk perceptions and behaviors is complex," said Dr. F. Daniel Ramirez, the study's lead author. He is a research fellow at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute in Ontario, Canada. But Ramirez and his co-authors don't think indifference is simply due to a lack of education or appreciation of health consequences. As study senior author Dr. Benjamin Hibbert explained in an American Heart Association news release, ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

Blood Test May Gauge Death Risk After Surgery

Posted 25 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 25, 2017 – A highly sensitive blood test can identify patients with a raised risk of death in the month after surgery, a large study suggests. On average, 1 percent of patients die within 30 days after noncardiac surgery – most from a heart attack, said researcher Dr. P.J. Devereaux, a professor at McMaster University in Ontario, Canada. Testing for a protein called troponin that's found in heart muscle can help identify those post-op patients most at risk, Devereaux and an international team of researchers reported. However, the study could not prove a direct cause-and-effect relationship between troponin levels and death risk. Surgery is a major stress to the body's organs. Troponin is released into the blood when the heart muscle has been damaged, Devereaux explained. "Most of the heart injuries happen in the first day-and-a-half after surgery, when most patients are ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Surgical Prophylaxis, Cardiothoracic Surgery

Common Food Nutrient Tied to Risky Blood Clotting

Posted 25 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 24, 2017 – A nutrient in meat and eggs may conspire with gut bacteria to make the blood more prone to clotting, a small study suggests. The nutrient is called choline. Researchers found that when they gave 18 healthy volunteers choline supplements, it boosted their production of a chemical called TMAO. That, in turn, increased their blood cells' tendency to clot. But the researchers also found that aspirin might reduce that risk. TMAO is short for trimethylamine N-oxide. It's produced when gut bacteria digest choline and certain other substances. Past studies have linked higher TMAO levels in the blood to heightened risks of blood clots, heart attack and stroke, said Dr. Stanley Hazen, the senior researcher on the new study. These findings, he said, give the first direct evidence that choline revs up TMAO production in the human gut, which then makes platelets (a type of ... Read more

Related support groups: Aspirin, Ischemic Stroke, Heart Attack, Excedrin, Transient Ischemic Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Aggrenox, Alka-Seltzer, Fiorinal, Excedrin Migraine, Arthritis Pain, Ecotrin, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Fiorinal with Codeine, Bayer Aspirin, Arthritis Pain Formula, Soma Compound, Norgesic, Excedrin Extra Strength, Norgesic Forte

When Oxygen Runs Low, the Naked Mole-Rat Finds a Way

Posted 20 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 20, 2017 – When brain cells are starved of oxygen, people and all other mammals run out of energy and begin to die. Not so for a hairless, underground rodent called the naked mole-rat. It survives low-oxygen conditions because its brain cells switch from using glucose as fuel to fructose – a process that is typically found in plants, not animals. Scientists believe their new findings could someday lead to new treatments for people who have a heart attack or stroke. "This is just the latest remarkable discovery about the naked mole-rat – a cold-blooded mammal that lives decades longer than other rodents, rarely gets cancer and doesn't feel many types of pain," said the study's leader, Thomas Park. He is a professor of biological sciences at the University of Illinois at Chicago. The naked mole-rat is native to Africa and lives in extensive underground burrows. In the ... Read more

Related support groups: Ischemic Stroke, Heart Attack, Transient Ischemic Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Diagnosis and Investigation

Blood Pressure: Know Your Numbers

Posted 18 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 18, 2017 – Having high blood pressure makes you more likely to have heart disease or a stroke. But because high blood pressure doesn't usually cause warning symptoms, you could be at risk without even knowing it. That's why it's important to have your blood pressure checked regularly by a healthcare professional. High blood pressure is a particular concern if you're black because it's more prevalent among blacks than any other group in the United States. Research from Johns Hopkins University found that a primary cause of high blood pressure among blacks was stress. However, anyone can develop high blood pressure. When you have a blood pressure check: The first, or top, number in the reading is called the systolic number; the second, or lower, number, is the diastolic number. Normal blood pressure is less than 120 mmHg for systolic pressure and a diastolic level of less ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Ischemic Stroke, Heart Attack, Transient Ischemic Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Thromboembolic Stroke Prophylaxis, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Post MI Syndrome

Do Marathons' Road Closures Lead to More Local Deaths?

Posted 13 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 12, 2017 – When a marathon shuts down city streets, it's more than an inconvenience: Nearby residents appear more likely to die from heart attack and cardiac arrest, a new study finds. The study, of 11 U.S. cities, found that older residents were less likely to survive the heart events on marathon days, compared to other days, perhaps due to delays in receiving care. Older people who landed in the hospital on a race day were over 13 percent more likely to die within a month, the findings showed. There was a similar difference when researchers compared those patients with older adults admitted the same day to hospitals outside the marathon-affected areas. The study drew praise but also notes of caution. "This is a great study," said Dr. Howard Mell, a spokesman for the American College of Emergency Physicians. When a city hosts a major sports event, he said, organizers ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome

Trans Fat Bans May Have Cut Heart Attack, Stroke Rate

Posted 12 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 12, 2017 – Could the contents of your cupcake affect your heart attack risk? It seems so, according to a new study that found lower rates of heart attack and stroke in communities that restrict trans fats in foods. Trans fats, which are found in products such as baked goods, chips, crackers and fried foods, have been linked to an increased risk of heart disease. In response, some U.S. cities have implemented policies to reduce trans fats in restaurant food. "Our study highlights the power of public policy to impact the cardiovascular health of a population. Trans fats are deleterious for cardiovascular health, and minimizing or eliminating them from the diet can substantially reduce rates of heart attack and stroke," said study author Dr. Eric Brandt. He's a clinical fellow in cardiovascular medicine at the Yale School of Medicine. The researchers compared 2002-13 data ... Read more

Related support groups: Ischemic Stroke, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis

Page 1 2 3 ... Next

Ask a Question

Further Information

Related Condition Support Groups

Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome, Ischemic Heart Disease

Related Drug Support Groups

lisinopril, aspirin, metoprolol, warfarin, Coumadin, Plavix, atenolol, propranolol, Diovan, view more... ramipril, clopidogrel, Lovenox, valsartan, Inderal, nitroglycerin, heparin, Lopressor, timolol, Metoprolol Succinate ER, perindopril, Tenormin, Arthritis Pain, Ecotrin, Metoprolol Tartrate, Nitrostat, Zestril, magnesium chloride, Arthritis Pain Formula, enoxaparin, Fragmin, Bayer Aspirin, Clexane, Altace, Nitro-Bid, Prinivil, Nitro-Dur, NitroQuick, trandolapril, Jantoven, dalteparin, Nitrolingual Pumpspray, fondaparinux, Bufferin, Activase, Low Dose ASA, Fasprin, Aspergum, streptokinase, Buffered Aspirin, Ascriptin, Abbokinase, TNKase, Sloprin, Clexane Forte, Aspir-Low, alteplase, Tridil, Easprin, St Joseph Aspirin, Aspirin Low Strength, Univasc, urokinase, Minitran, Nitrostat Tablets, ZORprin, Heparin Sodium, Nitrogard, Qbrelis, Mavik, Nitro TD Patch-A, Nitrodisc, Nitrocot, Kabikinase, Nitro-Par, Nitro-Bid IV, Nitrek, Nitrol Appli-Kit, Nitrong, Streptase, Nitroglyn E-R, Nitrol, NitroMist, Kinlytic, Eminase, Aspir 81, Aspirtab, Heartline, Ecpirin, Transderm-Nitro, Aspir-Mox IB, Chloromag, Lovenox HP, Magnaprin, Aspirin Buffered, Aspir-Mox, Abbokinase Open-Cath, Bayer Plus, Blocadren, Retavase Half-Kit, Retavase, Aceon, Medi-Seltzer, Buffasal, Buffex, Empirin, Halfprin, Nitro-Time, Mag-SR, eptifibatide, anistreplase, aluminum hydroxide / aspirin / calcium carbonate / magnesium hydroxide, moexipril, reteplase, Integrilin, Aspiritab, tenecteplase, Ecotrin Maximum Strength, Entercote, Acuprin 81, Norwich Aspirin, Ascriptin Enteric, Stanback Analgesic, Acetylsalicylic Acid, Zero-Order Release, Bayer Aspirin Regimen, Aspirin Lite Coat, YSP Aspirin, Therapy Bayer, Bufferin Extra Strength, Gennin-FC, Genacote, Extra Strength Bayer, Genprin, Litecoat Aspirin, Entaprin, Tri-Buffered Aspirin, Minitabs, Deponit