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Screen Time and Teen Time

Posted 12 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 14, 2017 – A new study challenges the widely held belief that spending a lot of time playing video games, using the computer or watching TV is harmful for teens. The study analyzed data from the 2013 Youth Risk Behavior Survey on Florida teens, average age 16. The findings showed only a small association between high amounts of so-called screen time and increased risk of depression, delinquency and poor school performance. Specifically, screen time accounted for 0.49 percent of the variance in delinquency, 1.7 percent in depressive symptoms and 1.2 percent in average grade points. There was no link between screen time and risky driving, risky sex, substance abuse or eating disorders. "Although an 'everything in moderation' message when discussing screen time with parents may be most productive, our results do not support a strong focus on screen time as a preventative ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Major Depressive Disorder, Eating Disorder, Substance Abuse

Eating Disorders Rampant on the Runway

Posted 2 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 1, 2017 – As the fashion industry gears up for New York Fashion Week next week, new research suggests that eating disorders are rampant on the runway. In a survey, more than half of the models questioned said they face constant pressure to be dangerously thin or change the shape of their body. "While acknowledgment of disordered eating within the fashion industry is not new, our research study shows the lengths that models are willing to take to achieve the industry's physical 'ideal,' and the extent to which models feel pressured by their agents and other industry professionals to compromise their health for their job," said study co-author Sara Ziff. She was a Harvard graduate student while doing the study. In the survey of 85 models, the researchers found just over 62 percent said that within the past year they were asked to lose weight or alter the shape of their ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Weight Loss, Binge Eating Disorder, Eating Disorder, Anorexia, Bulimia, Anorexia nervosa, Anorexia/Feeding Problems

Study Explores Electrical Brain Stimulation to Treat Bulimia

Posted 25 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25, 2017 – Electrical stimulation of the brain may temporarily ease the symptoms of the eating disorder bulimia nervosa, a small study suggests. The study included two men and 37 women with bulimia who underwent 20-minute sessions of transcranial direct current stimulation to an area of the brain involved with reward processing and self-regulation. There was also one sham session where the electrode stimulation lasted only 30 seconds. Participants then reported their desire to binge eat, fear of weight gain, general mood and frequency of bulimic behaviors in the 24 hours following treatment, the researchers said. The patients reported a reduction in bulimia symptoms after brain stimulation. The findings were published online Jan. 25 in the journal PLOS One. "Although these are modest, early findings, there is a clear improvement in symptoms and decision-making abilities ... Read more

Related support groups: Binge Eating Disorder, Eating Disorder, Anorexia, Bulimia, Anorexia nervosa, Diagnosis and Investigation, Head Imaging, Anorexia/Feeding Problems

Many Women With Eating Disorders Do Recover, Study Finds

Posted 20 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 20, 2016 – The media often portrays women with the eating disorders anorexia and bulimia as untreatable, and sadly, in about one-third of cases that may be true, new research suggests. But the same small study found that nearly two-thirds of these women did recover from these eating disorders – though in some cases it took more than a decade for them to get better. "The findings inspire me to remain hopeful in my work as a clinician with these patients," said study lead author Kamryn Eddy. She's co-director of the Eating Disorders Clinical and Research Program at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. An estimated 20 million females and 10 million males in the United States will have an eating disorder. Death rates from anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are estimated to be around 4 to 5 percent, the National Eating Disorders Association says. Anorexia is ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Weight Loss, Binge Eating Disorder, Eating Disorder, Psychiatric Disorders, Anorexia, Bulimia, Body Dysmorphic Disorder, Anorexia nervosa, Anorexia/Feeding Problems

For People With Mental Health Woes, Pets Can Be Invaluable

Posted 9 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 9, 2016 – Cats, dogs, birds and other pets can help people manage their mental disorders, a new study says. Researchers from the United Kingdom asked more than 50 adults with long-term mental conditions about the role pets play in their social networks. Sixty percent placed pets in the central and most important circle – above family, friends and hobbies. Another 20 percent placed pets in the second circle. Many said the constant presence and close proximity of their pets provide an immediate source of calm. For some, a pet helps distract them from symptoms and upsetting experiences such as hearing voices or suicidal thoughts. "You just want to sink into a pit... the cats force me to sort of still be involved with the world," one patient said. Another patient said: "I'm not thinking of the voices, I'm just thinking of the birds singing." The findings were published Dec. 8 ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Bipolar Disorder, Panic Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Major Depressive Disorder, Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Schizophrenia, Mania, Paranoid Disorder, Borderline Personality Disorder, Schizoaffective Disorder, Postpartum Depression, Autism, Eating Disorder, Psychosis

Neighborhoods May Be Key to Teens' Mental Well-Being

Posted 18 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 18, 2016 – Teenagers living in cohesive neighborhoods – where trusted neighbors get involved in monitoring each other's children – experience fewer symptoms of depression and anxiety, a new study suggests. The researchers also found consistent results across different cities regardless of family composition and neighborhood income, indicating strong neighborhoods help teen mental health across various populations. Along with common risk factors, neighborhood environments should probably be given more attention when looking for potential factors linked to teen mental health problems, said study author Louis Donnelly. He's a postdoctoral research associate at the Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing at Princeton University in Princeton, N.J. "Notably, whether a child grew up in a higher- or lower-income household, the associations were similar. The ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Social Anxiety Disorder, Agitation, Eating Disorder, Severe Mood Dysregulation, Aggressive Behavior

Health Tip: Thinking About Psychological Therapy?

Posted 16 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Psychological therapy involves more than discussing your problems with a professional. It can also help you cope with life's challenges, especially issues that bother you. Here are common reasons to seek therapy, courtesy of the American Academy of Family Physicians: Depression. Marital problems. Sexual issues. Stress and anxiety. Addiction. Grief and loss. Anger. Your career. Family issues. Chronic illness. Domestic violence. Eating disorders. Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Bipolar Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Major Depressive Disorder, Schizophrenia, Paranoid Disorder, Postpartum Depression, Eating Disorder, Psychosis, Psychiatric Disorders, Neurosis, Severe Mood Dysregulation

Health Tip: Health Tip: Risk Factors for Malnutrition

Posted 17 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Certain risk factors make you more prone than others to malnutrition, which doesn't necessarily come from lack of food. It's possible to be obese and not get enough nutrients (malnourishment) at the same time, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics says. According to the academy, here are common risk factors for malnutrition: Hospitalization. Advanced age, particularly if accompanied by dementia. Dental health problems. Loss of appetite. Serious head injury. Eating disorder. Serious infection. Organ failure. Read more

Related support groups: Weight Loss, Oral and Dental Conditions, Xerostomia, Dementia, Toothache, Binge Eating Disorder, Alzheimer's Disease, Head Injury, Eating Disorder, Gingivitis, Dental Abscess, Anorexia, Bulimia, Weight Loss/Failure to Thrive, Periodontitis, Anorexia nervosa, Prevention of Dental Caries, Head Injury w/ Intracranial Hemorrhage and Loss of Consciousness, Anorexia/Feeding Problems, Head Injury with Loss of Consciousness

3 Health Issues That Can Threaten Young Female Athletes

Posted 18 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 18, 2016 – Doctors need to be on the lookout for a trio of harmful health conditions in young female athletes, a new report says. Known as the "female athlete triad," the conditions include eating problems, menstrual problems and weakened bones, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. Experts now know that all three conditions need not be present together to cause long-term health issues, and that they are triggered by strenuous sports training and not eating enough to meet the body's demands. "Each one of the components really exists on a spectrum," explained report co-author Dr. Amanda Weiss Kelly, division chief of pediatric sports medicine at Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital in Cleveland. The report discusses what is known about the triad and how doctors can screen for it during routine office visits. Doctors can ask a number of questions involving eating ... Read more

Related support groups: Menstrual Disorders, Osteoporosis, Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder, Binge Eating Disorder, Premenstrual Syndrome, Eating Disorder, Period Pain, Amenorrhea, Fracture, bone, Anorexia, Prevention of Osteoporosis, Menorrhagia, Dysmenorrhea, Anorexia nervosa, Anorexia/Feeding Problems, Prevention of Fractures

Health Tip: Identifying Problem Eating

Posted 17 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

-- What you eat, how much you consume and how frequently you chow down all play a part in the likelihood that you'll gain weight. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics mentions these unhealthy eating habits: Consuming too much solid fat, added sugar or refined grains. Skipping meals, or eating too much. Eating too many meals at a restaurant, or in front of the TV or computer. Eating too many calorie-laden snacks, drinking high-calorie drinks or drinking too much alcohol. Eating for emotional reasons, not because you're hungry. Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Weight Loss, Binge Eating Disorder, Eating Disorder, Bulimia, Anorexia/Feeding Problems

No Link Between Anti-Smoking Drugs, Mental Health Issues: Study

Posted 23 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, April 22, 2016 – The anti-smoking drugs Chantix (varenicline) and Wellbutrin (bupropion) don't appear to raise the risk of serious mental health disorders such as depression, anxiety and suicidal thoughts, a new study suggests. "Clinical guidelines recommend that the most effective way to give up smoking is smoking cessation medication and counseling. However, smokers do not use these services enough, in part due to concerns that the medications may not be safe," said lead author Dr. Robert Anthenelli, professor of psychiatry at University of California, San Diego. The new study, published April 22 in The Lancet, should help ease those concerns for patients, the researchers said. The study was requested by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration due to concerns about the safety of the drugs used to help people quit smoking. Funding was provided by drug makers Pfizer (which makes ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Wellbutrin, Major Depressive Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Bupropion, Smoking, Contrave, Chantix, Schizophrenia, Wellbutrin XL, Smoking Cessation, Wellbutrin SR, Agitation, Nicotine, Eating Disorder, Psychosis, Zyban, Agitated State

Eating Disorders Seem More Common in Schools Where Girls Predominate

Posted 21 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 20, 2016 – Eating disorders may be more prevalent at schools where a greater portion of the student body is female, a new study suggests. British and Swedish researchers analyzed data from Sweden, and also found the risk increased when more of the students' parents had a university education. "Eating disorders have an enormous effect on the lives of young people who suffer from them – it is important to understand the risk factors so that we can address them," said study leader Dr. Helen Bould. Bould is a child and adolescent psychiatrist at the University of Oxford in England. "For a long time, clinicians in the field have noted that they seem to see more young people with eating disorders from some schools than others, but this is the first empirical evidence that this is the case," she said in a university news release. However, the study did not prove that these ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Social Anxiety Disorder, Binge Eating Disorder, Eating Disorder, Psychiatric Disorders, Anorexia, Bulimia, Anorexia nervosa, Anorexia/Feeding Problems

Underweight or Obese Women Who Drink and Smoke May Have Higher Asthma Risk

Posted 10 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, April 9, 2016 – Researchers say they have pinpointed several factors that increase asthma risk in women and – to a lesser extent – in men. They analyzed data from about 175,000 people between the ages of 18 and 44 in 51 countries. They found that underweight or obese women who drank and smoked were twice as likely to have asthma as those with a healthy weight who didn't drink or smoke. Underweight or obese women who smoked and drank were also two to three times more likely to have wheezing, according to the study published April 4 in the journal BMJ Open Respiratory Research. But the study did not prove that these factors cause asthma, it only showed an association. "Although individual physical and behavioral factors associated with asthma have been examined before, people are often exposed to multiple risk factors so it's important we understand the combined impact," lead ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Alcohol Dependence, Eating Disorder, Anorexia, Alcoholism, Bulimia, Hangover, Anorexia nervosa, Acute Alcohol Intoxication

Study Confirms Eating Disorders' Deadly Toll

Posted 29 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 29, 2016 – New research assesses the often fatal outcomes for people with eating disorders, particularly anorexia. The study found that people with anorexia nervosa were five times more likely to die early than those in the general population. Most of the deaths among people with anorexia, which involves a low body weight and an intense fear of gaining weight, were due to natural causes associated with the disorder. Suicide was the leading cause of non-natural death. People with bulimia nervosa, which usually involves binge-eating and purging, and other types of eating disorders also had higher-than-normal death rates, but not as high as those with anorexia, the investigators said. Risk factors for premature death among people with eating disorders included a high number of hospitalizations for the disorder, being discharged from a hospital program too soon, developing an ... Read more

Related support groups: Binge Eating Disorder, Eating Disorder, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation and Deficiency, Anorexia, Bulimia, Anorexia nervosa, Anorexia/Feeding Problems

Obesity Surgery Patients May Often Have Mental Health Disorders

Posted 12 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 12, 2016 – Many people having surgery for severe obesity also have mental health conditions, particularly depression and binge-eating disorder, a new review finds. The analysis of 68 studies found that almost one-quarter of obesity surgery candidates had a mood-related disorder, usually depression. Another 17 percent had binge-eating disorder, researchers report Jan. 12 in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Obesity surgery, known medically as bariatric surgery, can be an option for people who are severely overweight – typically 100 pounds or more. And while doctors have known that patients often have mental health symptoms as well, it has not been clear just how common that is, said study author Dr. Aaron Dawes. "What was striking to us is that depression and binge-eating disorder were both more than twice as common as they are in the general U.S. ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Obesity, Major Depressive Disorder, Binge Eating Disorder, Eating Disorder, Dysthymia, Bulimia, Neurotic Depression, Depressive Psychosis

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Binge Eating Disorder, Anorexia, Bulimia, Anorexia / Feeding Problems, Psychiatric Disorders