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Diabetes Mellitus News

Even a Little Walking Can Lengthen Your Life

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 19, 2017 – That evening stroll you take after dinner most nights may be doing you more good than you realize – new research suggests even a bit of regular walking can reduce your risk of death. "Walking has been described as the 'perfect exercise' because it is simple, free, convenient, doesn't require any special equipment or training, and can be done at any age," said study leader Alpa Patel, a cancer epidemiologist from the American Cancer Society. "With the near doubling of adults aged 65 and older expected by 2030, clinicians should encourage patients to walk even if less than the recommended amount, especially as they age, for health and longevity," Patel said in a society news release. Previous research has linked regular walking with a lower risk of heart disease, diabetes, and breast and colon cancers. However, many American adults don't get the recommended ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Diabetes, Type 2, Cancer, Smoking, Heart Disease, Smoking Cessation, Pre-Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance

Health Tip: Best Grains And Starchy Veggies for Diabetics

Posted 5 days ago by Drugs.com

-- Diabetics should choose whole grains over other starchy foods because whole grains are rich in vitamins, minerals and fiber, the American Diabetes Association says. Processed foods with white flour and added sugar should be avoided. The ADA stresses the need to read product nutrition labels, saying you should look for these whole-grain ingredients: Bulgur (cracked wheat) Whole wheat flour Whole oats/oatmeal Whole grain corn Brown rice Whole rye Whole grain barley Whole farro Wild rice Buckwheat Triticale Millet Quinoa Sorghum Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Diabetes, Type 2, Diabetic Neuropathy, Insulin Resistance, Diabetic Nerve Damage, Pre-Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus, Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA), Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Gestational Diabetes, Diabetic Ketoacidosis (in DM Type II), Diabetic Coma

Diabetes Pill Might Replace Injection to Control Blood Sugar

Posted 6 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 17, 2017 – An injectable class of diabetes medication – called glucagon-like peptide-1 or GLP-1 – might one day be available in pill form, research suggests. Based on the results of a global phase 2 clinical trial, the study authors reported a significant drop in blood sugar levels for people on the oral medication, and no significant increase in low blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia) compared to a placebo over six months. The findings also showed that people taking the highest dose of the pill lost a large amount of weight – about 15 pounds – compared to a weight loss of fewer than 3 pounds for people on the inactive placebo pill. The research was funded by Novo Nordisk, the company that makes the drug, called oral semaglutide. "Semaglutide could transform diabetes treatment," said Dr. Robert Courgi, an endocrinologist at Southside Hospital in Bay Shore, N.Y. ... Read more

Related support groups: Metformin, Insulin, Lantus, Diabetes, Type 1, Januvia, Glipizide, Glucophage, Novolog, Humalog, Invokana, Glyburide, Levemir, Lantus Solostar, Actos, Glimepiride, Novolin R, Amaryl, Onglyza, Novolin N, Pioglitazone

Nearly 4 in 10 U.S. Adults Now Obese

Posted 10 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 13, 2017 – Almost forty percent adults in the United States are now obese, continuing an ever-expanding epidemic of obesity that's expected to lead to sicker Americans and higher health care costs. Almost four out of 10 adults and 18.5 percent of kids aged 2 to 19 now meet the clinical definition of obesity, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That's up from 30.5 percent of adults and 13.9 percent of children in 1999-2000, the CDC report noted. Public health experts are concerned that the continuing rise in obesity will lead to greater numbers of people suffering from diabetes, heart disease and other chronic illnesses. "We've made tremendous progress reducing deaths due to cardiovascular disease and stroke in our country. Part of that is due to treatment. Part of that is due to the tremendous reduction in tobacco use," said ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Weight Loss, Heart Disease, Pre-Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

Stroke Risk Factors Are Rising

Posted 12 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 11, 2017 – While progress is being made in reducing the number of stroke deaths, it seems that more people who experience these brain attacks have significant stroke risk factors, a new study reveals. The rates of high blood pressure, diabetes, abnormal cholesterol, smoking and drug abuse have all been on the rise in stroke patients over recent years, the study authors said. The study included over 900,000 people hospitalized for stroke between 2004 and 2014. Each year, prevalence of high blood pressure went up by 1 percent, diabetes rose by 2 percent, high cholesterol went up by 7 percent, smoking increased by 5 percent, and drug abuse jumped 7 percent, the researchers found. "The risk of dying from a stroke has declined significantly, while at the same time the risk factors are increasing," said researcher Dr. Ralph Sacco. He's a professor of neurology at the ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Opiate Dependence, Hypertension, Smoking, Ischemic Stroke, High Cholesterol, Drug Dependence, Transient Ischemic Attack, Pre-Diabetes, Substance Abuse, Diabetes Mellitus, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Pump May Beat Shots for Type 1 Diabetes

Posted 13 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 10, 2017 – In young people with type 1 diabetes, insulin pump therapy may offer better blood sugar control and fewer complications than daily injections of the vital hormone, new German research suggests. "Insulin pumps work, and they work even somewhat better than multiple daily injections overall," said Dr. Robert Rapaport, chief of the division of pediatric endocrinology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. Dr. Siham Accacha, a pediatric endocrinologist at NYU Winthrop Hospital in Mineola, N.Y., explained why that might be so. "If the pump is really taken care of, you can micromanage your diabetes," she said. "You can stop the pump if your blood glucose is coming down, or you can give a bit more insulin if it's going up." Both Rapaport and Accacha prefer pump use, but if patients would rather do multiple daily injections, the doctors said ... Read more

Related support groups: Insulin, Diabetes, Type 1, Diabetic Neuropathy, Hypoglycemia, Diabetic Nerve Damage, Diabetes Mellitus, Diabetic Retinopathy, Diabetic Ketoacidosis (in DM Type I), Diabetic Coma (in DM Type I)

Flu Shot Key for People With Diabetes

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Oct. 8, 2017 – With predictions calling for a potentially bad flu season this year, doctors are urging people – particularly those with diabetes – to get vaccinated. Many people with diabetes don't get a seasonal flu shot each year, according to the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE). Some people with the blood sugar disease don't realize they're at risk for flu-related complications. Others have misguided fears that the shot will trigger an adverse reaction, the group explained. However, people with diabetes are more likely to develop serious flu-related health problems if they get the virus, the AADE cautioned. The group said the flu shot is a safe and effective way to prevent or reduce the severity of these complications. "Reducing risks is one of the AADE's seven key self-care behaviors for managing diabetes, and getting the flu shot every fall is an ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Metformin, Insulin, Victoza, Lantus, Diabetes, Type 1, Saxenda, Januvia, Glipizide, Glucophage, Novolog, Humalog, Insulin Resistance, Bydureon, Janumet, Invokana, Trulicity, Byetta, Glyburide, Lantus Solostar

Working Night Shifts May Widen Your Waistline

Posted 19 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 4, 2017 – Workers who regularly pull overnight shifts may be more prone to pack on the pounds, a new analysis suggests. The finding involved an in-depth look at 28 studies conducted between 1999 and 2016. All the investigations explored the health impact of shift work, in which employees are regularly asked to either alternate between daytime and overnight schedules or to exclusively work overnight hours. An estimated 700 million men and women around the world now follow that work pattern, representing about 20 percent of the global workforce, the researchers said. And while the numbers varied by study, the new analysis determined that, on average, routinely working a night shift seems to boost the risk for becoming obese or overweight by 29 percent. Although the review could not prove cause-and-effect, nutrition experts expressed little surprise at the finding. Connie ... Read more

Related support groups: Insomnia, Obesity, Sleep Disorders, Ischemic Stroke, Sleep Apnea, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Diabetes Mellitus, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Ischemic Heart Disease, Metabolic Disorder Including Congenital

Tasty Ways to Get More Fiber

Posted 29 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 29, 2017 – You probably know that it's a good idea to eat more fiber. But do you know why? Fiber is found in plant-based foods. It adds volume to your diet, but passes through the intestines quickly because the body can't digest it. That's why fiber can make you feel full faster and prevent constipation. It may also help lower your cholesterol level and reduce your risk for heart disease, obesity and diabetes. According to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, women should get 25 grams of fiber every day and men, 38 grams. Yet only 5 percent of Americans meet this guideline. With a little effort, you can reach this healthful goal by eating a variety of fiber-rich foods rather than depending on supplements. That's a good idea because you also get the foods' other nutrients – vitamins, minerals and more. Vegetables are a major source of fiber, some more than others. ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Heart Disease, High Cholesterol, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus, Dietary Fiber Supplementation, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance

Glucose Monitoring System Eliminates Need for Finger Pricks

Posted 29 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 28, 2017 – The FreeStyle Flash Glucose Monitoring System has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, making it the first sanctioned device to monitor blood sugar in adult diabetics without the need for a finger prick. "This system allows people with diabetes to avoid the additional step of fingerstick calibration, which can sometimes be painful, but still provides necessary information for treating their diabetes," said Donald St. Pierre, acting director of the Office of In Vitro Diagnostics and Radiological Health and deputy director of new product evaluation in the FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health. The system uses a small sensor implanted below the skin and a mobile reader to continuously monitor blood sugar, the agency said in a news release. People with diabetes must monitor their blood glucose levels frequently, often multiple times ... Read more

Related support groups: Insulin, Diabetes, Type 1, Diabetes Mellitus, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance

FDA Approves New Continuous Glucose Monitor for Diabetes

Posted 28 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 28, 2017 – The first fingerstick-free blood sugar monitoring system for adults with diabetes has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System features a small sensor wire that's placed below the skin's surface and continuously monitors blood sugar (glucose) levels. People with diabetes can wave a mobile reader above the sensor wire to check their glucose levels. The system is approved for use in people with diabetes aged 18 and older. After a 12-hour start-up period, it can be worn for up to 10 days, the FDA said. "This system allows people with diabetes to avoid the additional step of fingerstick calibration, which can sometimes be painful, but still provides necessary information for treating their diabetes – with a wave of the mobile reader," Donald St. Pierre said in an FDA news release. He is deputy ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Insulin, Diabetes, Type 1, Diabetes Mellitus, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance

Gain Benefits From Simply Moving More

Posted 26 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 26, 2017 – The link between exercise and good health is a strong one. Still, many people – particularly older adults – find it difficult to take part in formal exercises, and become less physically active over time. But scientists are discovering that if you keep moving, you can enjoy health benefits throughout your life, especially later on. According to a study published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, people over 60 who stayed active in their everyday lives – even without participating in a formal exercise program – had a lower risk of developing metabolic syndrome. This syndrome can lead to diabetes, heart disease or heart attack, and even death. The study participants' waistlines were trimmer and their cholesterol was lower. The men in particular also had lower levels of insulin and blood sugar. The kinds of activities cited in the study included ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Weight Loss, Heart Attack, Pre-Diabetes, Myocardial Infarction, Diabetes Mellitus, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

Heath Tip: Dining Out If You Have Diabetes

Posted 15 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

-- For people who manage diabetes with insulin, eating out can be a source of stress due to the risks of fluctuating blood sugar. The American Diabetes Association suggests how to make eating out safer while you're watching your glucose levels: Make a reservation for your usual mealtime. If the restaurant doesn't take reservations, avoid crowded restaurants that typically have a long wait, or go earlier. Always travel with a few crackers, in case the meal is delayed. If your meal is going to be late, eat a fruit orstarchat your usual mealtime. Then eat the full meal at the later hour. Talk with your doctor about what to do if you eat meals at varied times. Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Insulin, Diabetes Mellitus, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance

Hidden Gems in Your Health Insurance Plan

Posted 15 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 15, 2017 – You might only think about your health insurance coverage when it's time for a doctor visit. But there may be many hidden health gems in your policy – wellness programs. Usually offered through your employer, wellness programs are designed to improve your health and help you avoid chronic conditions or better manage ones that you may already be battling. About half of all U.S. employers offer wellness initiatives, according to a study sponsored by the federal Department of Labor and the Department of Health and Human Services. They include such programs as ways to help you manage diabetes or lose weight, screenings to identify health risks, and interventions to promote a healthy lifestyle. But few people take advantage of these benefits, especially programs to uncover and treat health conditions, even when they're free. Yet participation can make a difference ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Diabetes, Type 2, Weight Loss, Diabetes Mellitus, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance

Increasing Salt Intake Tied to Diabetes Risk

Posted 15 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 14, 2017 – High levels of salt consumption may increase an adult's risk of developing diabetes, researchers say. The new study included data from a few thousand people in Sweden. The findings showed that salt intake was associated with an average 65 percent increase in the risk of developing type 2 diabetes for each 2.5 extra grams of salt (slightly less than half a teaspoon) consumed per day. People with the highest salt intake (about 1.25 teaspoons of salt or higher) were 72 percent more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those with the lowest intake, the investigators found. The study, led by Bahareh Rasouli of the Institute of Environmental Medicine at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, was scheduled for presentation Thursday at the annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Lisbon, Portugal. The current study didn't look ... Read more

Related support groups: Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Sodium Chloride, Diabetes Mellitus, Diagnosis and Investigation, HalfLytely and Bisacodyl, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Rhinaris, Hyper-Sal, ENTsol, Dextrose/Sodium Chloride, Saline Nasal Mist, Thermotabs, Potassium Chloride/Sodium Chloride, Ayr Saline Nasal, Neilmed Nasogel, Rhino-Mist, Tip-Lok Diluent, PulmoSal, Ocean Kids

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