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Many Disabled Adults Aren't Screened for Colon Cancer: Study

Posted 19 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 5, 2017 – American adults with disabilities have lower colon cancer screening rates than other adults, a new study finds. Researchers reviewed South Carolina Medicaid and Medicare claims, state health plan claims and hospital discharge data from 2000 to 2009. About 48 percent of the general population reported having routine screenings, compared to 34 percent of those with intellectual disabilities; 44 percent of those with spinal cord injuries, and 46 percent of people with blindness or limited sight. "These individuals may not be routinely screened for colon cancer due to a lack of education and awareness, transportation challenges or other barriers," study author Chelsea Deroche said in a University of Missouri-Columbia news release. She is an assistant professor in the Department of Health Management and Informatics. "These findings support the need for increased ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Prolonged Antibiotic Use Tied to Precancerous Colon Growths

Posted 20 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 4, 2017 – Taking antibiotics for an extended period in early to middle adulthood might increase your risk for precancerous growths in your colon, a large study suggests. Women who took antibiotics for two weeks or more in their 20s through their 50s were more likely to have colon lesions in their 60s than women who didn't take the drugs for an extended period, researchers found. If not removed, these lesions – called polyps or adenomas – can lead to colon cancer. "This suggests that alterations in the naturally occurring bacteria that live in one's intestines caused by antibiotics might predispose individuals to colorectal cancer," said lead researcher Dr. Andrew Chan. But, although the risk for colon cancer was raised, it wasn't to a level "where it should worry individuals who need to take antibiotics for clear medical reasons," said Chan, an associate professor of ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Can Daily Low-Dose Aspirin Lower Cancer Death Risk?

Posted 4 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 3, 2017 – Millions of Americans take low-dose aspirin every day for heart health. In doing so, they may also slightly lower their risk of dying from several cancers, a large new study suggests. Researchers found that among more than 130,000 U.S. adults, those who regularly used aspirin were 7 percent to 11 percent less likely to die of cancer over the next few decades. The risks of dying from colon, breast, prostate and – for men – lung cancer were all lower among regular aspirin users, compared to non-users, the findings showed. The findings add to evidence that aspirin has cancer-fighting abilities, the researchers said. But they also stressed that people should not start popping a daily aspirin in the hopes of avoiding cancer. There is strong evidence, from research in general, that low-dose aspirin may lower the risk of colon cancer, said Dr. Ernest Hawk, a ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Aspirin, Excedrin, Colorectal Cancer, Aggrenox, Alka-Seltzer, Fiorinal, Excedrin Migraine, Arthritis Pain, Ecotrin, Fiorinal with Codeine, Arthritis Pain Formula, Bayer Aspirin, Norgesic, Soma Compound, Excedrin Extra Strength, Norgesic Forte, Percodan, Anacin, Levacet

Survival Continues to Improve for Most Cancers

Posted 31 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 31, 2017 – Overall cancer death rates in the United States continue to fall, but racial gaps persist, a new report says. Death rates fell between 2010 and 2014 for 11 of the 16 most common cancers in men and for 13 of the most common types in women, including lung, colon, prostate and breast cancers. However, death rates rose for cancers of the liver, pancreas and brain in men and for the liver and uterus in women. And improvements in cancer survival weren't equal for all Americans. "While this report found that five-year survival for most types of cancer improved among both blacks and whites over the past several decades, racial disparities for many common cancers have persisted, and they may have increased for prostate cancer and female breast cancer," said Dr. Lynne Penberthy. She's associate director of the U.S. National Cancer Institute's Surveillance Research ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Lung Cancer, Renal Cell Carcinoma, Colorectal Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Brain Tumor, Melanoma, Pancreatic Cancer, Skin Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, Endometrial Cancer, Osteosarcoma, Small Cell Lung Cancer, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Bladder Cancer, Cervical Cancer, Melanoma - Metastatic

High Doses of Vitamin D Fail to Cut Cancer Risk, Study Finds

Posted 28 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 28, 2017 – High doses of vitamin D supplements may not lower older women's risk of developing cancer, a new clinical trial finds. Many studies have hinted that vitamin D might help ward off cancer. Some, for example, have found that people with higher blood levels of the vitamin have lower rates of certain cancers, including colon and breast cancers. In lab experiments, vitamin D has also shown activities that might slow the growth of cancer – such as, promoting the death of abnormal cells. But those types of studies cannot prove that taking vitamin D actually causes cancer risk to drop, explained Dr. JoAnn Manson, of Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston. That, Manson said, takes clinical trials that test vitamin D against an inactive placebo. That's exactly what the new study did, but it found no significant benefit. The trial involved ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Vitamin D Deficiency, Colorectal Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Caltrate 600 with D, Citracal + D, Calcium/Vitamin D, Citracal Petites, Oysco 500 with D, Calcarb with D, Calcium 600 D, Citracal Creamy Bites, Calcet, Oyster Shell Calcium, Caltro with Vitamin D, Oyst-Cal-D, Citracal Maximum, Os-Cal 250 with D, Citracal 250 mg + D

Many Dialysis Patients Get Unnecessary Colonoscopies

Posted 24 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 24, 2017 – Older Americans on kidney dialysis have high rates of colonoscopy screening for colon cancer, but most get little benefit from the screening, a new study suggests. Dialysis patients have high rates of death, so routine colon cancer screening doesn't improve survival for most dialysis patients who don't qualify for a kidney transplant. Therefore, dialysis patients who have a limited life expectancy and no signs or symptoms of colon cancer shouldn't undergo screening for the disease, according to the American Society of Nephrology. "Physicians should carefully evaluate patients' prognoses and consider the likelihood that they will truly benefit before ordering screening tests," said study co-leader Dr. Christopher Carlos, from the University of California, San Francisco. In this study, researchers reviewed data from more than 469,000 Medicare beneficiaries. They ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Renal Failure, Colorectal Cancer, Renal Transplant, Chronic Kidney Disease, Hemodialysis, Peritoneal dialysis

Keep Colon Cancer at Bay

Posted 22 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 22, 2017 – Colon cancer can be treated and cured if it's diagnosed early, and a colonoscopy is one of the best ways to detect the disease, a gastroenterologist says. "Routine colonoscopy exams are lifesavers and may reduce your risk of succumbing to colorectal cancer by 90 percent," said Dr. Ellen Gutkin, from NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital Queens. Even healthy adults with no family or medical history of colon cancer should get routine colonoscopies. The cancer can develop without symptoms and once symptoms begin, it could mean the cancer is more advanced and less likely to be cured. Gutkin noted that women and men have the same risk for colon cancer, and that having no risk factors does not mean you won't develop the disease. "The single biggest modifiable risk factor for colorectal cancer is a failure to be screened," she said in a hospital news release. Beginning at ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Helping Cancer Caregivers Help Themselves

Posted 22 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 22, 2017 – When people are diagnosed with cancer, it's easy to overlook the toll the disease also takes on their caregivers, say social workers who specialize in cancer care. Cancer can dramatically alter relationships, forcing parents to depend on their children, or independent people to rely on loved ones. Meanwhile, those who support cancer patients – such as spouses, partners, siblings, children or friends – tend to put their own needs on the back burner. Caregivers who keep their mind and body healthy, however, are able to provide better care for their loved ones, advise Lauren Kriegel and Autumn Banta, oncology social workers at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey. Finding the time and energy to take care of yourself may seem difficult while caring for someone with cancer, Kriegel and Banta pointed out in a Rutgers news release. However, there are ways ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer

Family History of Colon Cancer Calls for Earlier Screening

Posted 21 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 21, 2017 – If you've got a family history of colon or rectal cancers, you probably need to start screening for these conditions before you turn 50, a cancer expert says. People with a close relative who has had colon or rectal cancer have a greater risk of being diagnosed with these cancers too, said Dr. Walter Koltun, chief of colon and rectal surgery at the Penn State Health Hershey Medical Center in a hospital news release. "A significant portion of the population does have those risk factors," Koltun said. "And their risk goes up significantly depending on who has been affected." If more than one close relative has had colon or rectal cancer, your risk of getting such a cancer is 12 times greater, he added. People who are diagnosed with colon or rectal cancers at a young age are more likely to have a genetic trait that could increase their risk for the disease. ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Crohn's Disease, Colonoscopy, Prostate Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, History - Radiation Therapy

Hodgkin Lymphoma Survivors Face Risk of Second Cancer: Study

Posted 13 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, March 13, 2017 – The risk of developing a second type of cancer may be high among Hodgkin lymphoma survivors, especially those with a family history of cancer. That's the finding of a new European study in which researchers examined data from more than 9,500 Hodgkin lymphoma patients. Hodgkin lymphoma, once known as Hodgkin's disease, is a cancer that starts in the white blood cells called lymphocytes. Lymphocytes are part of the immune system, according to the American Cancer Society. "The vast majority of patients with Hodgkin lymphoma are cured with a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy," said study author Amit Sud, a clinical research fellow at the Institute of Cancer Research in London. "Our research has shown that these patients are at substantially increased risk of a second cancer later in life – and particularly if they have a family history of cancer," Sud ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Cancer, Breast Cancer, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Hodgkin's Lymphoma

Colon Cancer Rates, Deaths Drop in Americans Over 50

Posted 1 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 1, 2017 – In some good news for older Americans, a new report shows that colorectal cancer rates among those over 50 fell 32 percent since 2000, while deaths from the disease fell by 34 percent. Those declines are likely due to increased screening, which can prevent colorectal cancer by detecting and removing precancerous polyps, according to the report released March 1 by the American Cancer Society (ACS). Among older adults, colorectal cancer rates are dropping fastest in those aged 65 and older, and for tumors located in the distal colon (the last part of the colon). The drop is slowest among those aged 50 to 64 and for rectal tumors, the researchers found. For example, there was a 9 percent decline in the incidence of rectal tumors in men aged 50 to 64 and no decline among women in the same age group. But those rates dropped 38 percent in men and 41 percent in ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Another Study Ties Obesity to Certain Cancers

Posted 1 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 1, 2017 – Carrying extra weight increases the risk of a number of cancers, a new review reports. Additional pounds appear to particularly influence the risk of cancers related to the digestive organs or those driven by hormonal abnormalities, according to the review's European authors. The evidence is so strong at this point that important organizations such as the International Agency for Research on Cancer describe "excess body weight as an important cause of cancers," said Susan Gapstur. She's vice president of epidemiology at the American Cancer Society. The new evidence review was led by Maria Kyrgiou, of Imperial College London's Department of Surgery and Cancer. The review found that a jump in a person's body mass index (BMI) of 5 was associated with a higher cancer risk in the esophagus, bone marrow, biliary tract system, pancreas and kidneys. BMI is a rough ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Cancer, Weight Loss, Breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Renal Cell Carcinoma, Colorectal Cancer, Pancreatic Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, Endometrial Cancer, Stomach Cancer, Gastric Cancer, Solid Tumors, Wilms' Tumor, Giant Cell Tumor of Bone, Neoplasm of Bone, Insulinoma, Peritoneal Cancer

Colon Cancer on the Rise Among Gen Xers, Millennials

Posted 28 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 28, 2017 – Americans in their early 50s and younger – Gen Xers and millennials – are experiencing significant increases in colon and rectal cancer, a new study reports. And this may portend an overall increase in colon and rectal cancer in the years to come, the study authors said, adding that an old foe might be to blame – the obesity epidemic. People born in 1990 now have double the risk of colon cancer and four times the risk of rectal cancer, compared with those born around 1950 when the risk was lowest, the researchers said. "The increase in these rates coincides with the obesity epidemic," said lead researcher Rebecca Siegel, strategic director for surveillance information services at the American Cancer Society. "What might be going on is that the same factors that caused the increase in obesity – like changing dietary habits and a more sedentary lifestyle – ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Weight Loss, Colorectal Cancer, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Doctors Handled Influx of Obamacare Patients: Study

Posted 27 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 27, 2017 – Doctors' offices capably shouldered the burden of millions of new Medicaid patients gaining access to health insurance through the Affordable Care Act, a new study reveals. "We found a dramatic increase in primary care offices' ability to take in these newly insured patients," said study senior author Dr. Karin Rhodes. For the study, researchers posed as patients seeking appointments. They found that availability for Medicaid-covered appointments with primary care physicians increased by 5.4 percentage points between 2012 and 2016, while remaining essentially stable for those with private insurance. Medicaid is the publicly funded insurance program for the poor. "There wasn't a crisis in primary care overload that significantly reduced access for either people who were privately insured or who had Medicaid," said Rhodes. She is vice president of care management ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

Prison Time Can Be Deadly … to Health

Posted 26 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Feb. 24, 2017 – Prison time can exact a deadly toll on health, new research suggests. Being behind bars puts people at greater risk for both developing certain types of cancer and dying from their disease, Canadian researchers found. "We know that people who spend time in jails and prisons in Canada are more likely to use alcohol and tobacco, as well as have infections such as HPV (human papillomavirus) and HIV, which can increase the risk of developing some types of cancer," said study author Dr. Fiona Kouyoumdjian. She is a researcher at St. Michael's Hospital and McMaster University in Toronto. For the study, the researchers followed nearly 50,000 people sentenced to jail time in Ontario in 2000. Specifically, the investigators examined how many of these inmates developed cancer and how many died from the disease over the course of 12 years. By 2012, 2.6 percent of the men ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Cancer, Hepatitis C, Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Colorectal Cancer, Human Papilloma Virus, Cervical Cancer, Viral Infection

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