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Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) News

Related terms: CFS, Immune Dysfunction Syndrome, Post-Viral Fatigue Syndrome, Benign Myalgic Encephalomyelitis, Myalgic Encephalomyelitis, ME, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, CFIDS, Chronic Fatigue and Immune Dysfunction Syndrome, Chronic Fatigue, Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease, Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, ME/CFS

Gut Bacteria May Hold Clues to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Posted 15 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 15, 2016 – Chronic fatigue syndrome – a condition that continues to baffle doctors – may be influenced by a person's intestinal bacteria – sometimes called gut microbiome, new research finds. "Patients with chronic fatigue syndrome have a different profile of bacterial species in their gut microbiome than healthy individuals," said the study's senior author, Maureen Hanson. She's a professor of molecular biology and genetics at Cornell University, in Ithaca, N.Y. In the small study, she and her colleagues found that people with chronic fatigue syndrome had less diversity or different types of bacteria, compared to healthy people without chronic fatigue syndrome. People with chronic fatigue syndrome also had more species of bacteria that promote inflammation and fewer bacteria that dampen inflammation, the researchers found. The new findings provide evidence to refute ... Read more

Related support groups: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), Gastrointestinal Disorders, Acidophilus, Florastor, Lactobacillus Acidophilus, Flora-Q, VSL#3, Floranex, Lactinex, Saccharomyces Boulardii Lyo, Bio-K+, Florajen, Restora, Probiotic Formula, Florajen3, Flora-Q 2, Bacid, Culturelle DS, Lactobacillus Acidophilus/lactobacillus Casei/lactobacillus Rhamnosus, Gerber Soothe

Chronic Fatigue Therapies Provide Some With Long-Term Relief

Posted 23 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 23, 2015 – For some people with chronic fatigue syndrome, two types of treatment can provide long-term benefits, new research suggests. Chronic fatigue syndrome is characterized by extreme, debilitating fatigue that doesn't go away with rest, and lasts for six months or more, hindering normal, everyday activity. There is no cure. After evaluating four potential treatments for the mysterious condition, British researchers concluded that a form of talk therapy, called cognitive behavioral therapy, and graded exercise therapy are among the best available treatments for extended relief. "There is always hope for a simpler treatment in a pill, but we are not near that yet. So, at present treatments that work to rehabilitate patients toward normal activity remain the best ones," said Dr. Michael Sharpe, a study co-author and professor of psychological medicine at the University ... Read more

Related support groups: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS)

Health Tip: Boost Energy Without Caffeine

Posted 6 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

-- When run down, many people reach for an extra cup of coffee. But there are plenty of energy-boosting foods that don't contain caffeine. The National Sleep Foundation recommends eating: Magnesium-rich nuts, such as hazelnuts, cashews or almonds. Iron-rich spinach, which promotes oxygen in the cells and boosts energy. Eggs, including the yolk. They're packed with protein and B vitamins, which help convert food into energy. Edamame, which is rich in B vitamins, phosphorous and copper, which also help convert food into energy. Fresh fruit, which offers natural sugar. It also has beneficial fiber. Opt for vitamin C-rich offerings, such as oranges, kiwi, mangoes, pineapple and strawberries. Read more

Related support groups: Fatigue, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), Caffeine, Fioricet, Excedrin, Alert, Fiorinal, Excedrin Migraine, Cafergot, Fiorinal with Codeine, Esgic, Norgesic, Headache Relief, Fioricet with Codeine, Keep Going, Esgic-Plus, Acetaminophen/Butalbital/Caffeine, Excedrin Extra Strength, Trezix, Dolgic Plus

DNA Damage May Play a Role in Gulf War Syndrome

Posted 23 Sep 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23, 2015 – Unexplained chronic fatigue, muscle pain and problems with thinking are experienced by a quarter of Gulf War veterans, and new research suggests exposure to DNA-damaging chemicals may cause this condition, known as Gulf War Syndrome. Previous studies have suggested that the symptoms stem from a malfunction of mitochondria, the site in cells where molecules that power the body are made. The mitochondria have their own DNA, separate from the cell's. Increases in mitochondrial DNA damage the mitochondria's ability to produce energy, leaving the individual feeling slow and tired. And the new study found direct evidence of increased damage to this cell powerhouse among Gulf War vets. Researchers analyzed blood samples to measure the amount of mitochondrial DNA and degree of damage to this DNA among veterans with Gulf War Illness (GWI). The vets not only had more ... Read more

Related support groups: Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS)

Health Tip: Exercising Despite Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Posted 28 May 2015 by Drugs.com

-- While chronic fatigue syndrome zaps your energy, regular exercise can help give you a boost. The American Council on Exercise offers this advice: Talk to your doctor about exercising safely. Start your exercise program slowly, and gradually increase the intensity, duration and frequency of exercise. As you get stronger, incorporate flexibility, cardiovascular and resistance training exercises. Schedule a few minutes of rest after each short bout of exercise. Begin and end each workout with gentle stretching. Read more

Related support groups: Fatigue, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS)

Clues to 'Brain Fog' in Chronic Fatigue Patients Found in Spinal Fluid

Posted 31 Mar 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 31, 2015 – People with chronic fatigue syndrome show a distinct pattern of immune system proteins in their spinal fluid – a finding that could shed light on the "brain fog" that marks the condition, researchers say. The new study found that, compared with healthy people, those with chronic fatigue syndrome had lower levels of certain immune-system proteins called cytokines in the fluid that bathes the spinal cord and brain. The exception was one particular cytokine, which was elevated in not only people with chronic fatigue, but also those with multiple sclerosis. The finding could offer clues as to why people with chronic fatigue syndrome typically have problems with memory, concentration and thinking, said lead researcher Dr. Mady Hornig, a professor at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health in New York City. The study also bolsters evidence that some ... Read more

Related support groups: Multiple Sclerosis, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), Diagnosis and Investigation

Immune System Changes Tied to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Posted 27 Feb 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Feb. 27, 2015 – Chronic fatigue syndrome appears to be linked to specific changes in a person's immune system, particularly increased amounts of chemical messengers that regulate immune responses, researchers report. The study adds to growing evidence that chronic fatigue syndrome is caused by a malfunctioning immune system, said lead author Dr. Mady Hornig. She is director of Translational Research at the Jerome L. and Dawn Greene Infectious Disease Laboratory at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, in New York City. The immune system of a new chronic fatigue syndrome patient appears unable to shut down or reduce its response to an infection that has passed, Hornig said. Instead, the system continues to pump out large amounts of cytokines – chemical messengers that coordinate the response of the immune system's many cell types. "Their immune system is no ... Read more

Related support groups: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS)

New Name, New Criteria for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome?

Posted 10 Feb 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 – Chronic fatigue syndrome, a debilitating illness affecting up to 2.5 million Americans, may soon get a new name and set of diagnostic criteria. In a report released Tuesday, an independent panel of experts convened by the U.S. government called the illness a "legitimate" disease that features five main symptoms and should be taken seriously by physicians. In fact, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) committee behind the report is urging that chronic fatigue syndrome be renamed "Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease," to better reflect the seriousness of its effect on patients. The new report could prove a watershed moment following years of struggle for people with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), who often have had to fight to convince doctors that something was truly wrong with them, said Suzanne Vernon, scientific director of the ... Read more

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Panel Asks: What Defines Chronic Fatigue Syndrome?

Posted 9 Feb 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 9, 2015 – Chronic fatigue syndrome is about to get a new clinical definition, with the hope that it will help physicians better diagnose people afflicted with the mysterious and complex disorder. On Tuesday, the Institute of Medicine will release a long-awaited report that will define diagnostic criteria for chronic fatigue syndrome and examine whether a new name for the disease is warranted. The report could prove a landmark moment following years of struggle for people with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), who often have had to fight to convince their own doctors that something was truly wrong with them, said Suzanne Vernon, scientific director of the Solve ME/CFS Initiative. "I believe we are at a tipping point for people suffering from ME/CFS, where we are going to be able to get people diagnosed, and with that diagnosis comes the ability ... Read more

Related support groups: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS)

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Linked to Early Menopause: CDC

Posted 5 Feb 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 5, 2015 – There's a link between early menopause and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), a new study suggests. The findings may help explain why women are two to four times more likely to have CFS than men, and why the condition is most common among women in their 40s, the researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. "CFS can take a tremendous toll on women's lives at midlife and on our society and health care system. Being aware of the association of CFS and earlier menopause can help providers assist women in sorting out symptoms of CFS from symptoms of menopause," Dr. Margery Gass, executive director of the North American Menopause Society, said in a society news release. Although the study was able to find a link between early menopause and chronic fatigue syndrome, the researchers weren't able to learn whether one condition causes the ... Read more

Related support groups: Menopausal Disorders, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS)

Therapists Must Ease Patients' Fear When Treating Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Study

Posted 14 Jan 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14, 2015 – Easing fears that exercise may worsen symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome is crucial in efforts to prevent disability in people with the condition, a new study says. Chronic fatigue syndrome is a complex condition, characterized by overwhelming fatigue that is not improved by bed rest, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Treatments are aimed at reducing patients' fatigue and improving physical function, such as the ability to walk and do everyday tasks. A previous study found that people with chronic fatigue syndrome benefit from two types of counseling: cognitive behavioral therapy, or graded exercise therapy, a personalized and gradually increasing exercise program. This new study looked at how the two approaches can help patients. "By identifying the mechanisms whereby some patients benefit from treatment, we hope that this ... Read more

Related support groups: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS)

Brain Scans Yield Clues to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Posted 30 Oct 2014 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 30, 2014 – There are clear differences in the brains of people with chronic fatigue syndrome and the brains of healthy people, new research indicates. Scientists at Stanford University School of Medicine said their findings could help doctors diagnose this baffling condition and shed light on how it develops. People with chronic fatigue syndrome are often misdiagnosed or labeled as hypochondriacs. Using three types of brain scanning technologies, "we found that [chronic fatigue syndrome] patients' brains diverge from those of healthy subjects in at least three distinct ways," said the study's lead author, Dr. Michael Zeineh, assistant professor of radiology, in a Stanford news release. Chronic fatigue syndrome affects up to 4 million people in the United States alone, says the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The condition, which causes debilitating and ... Read more

Related support groups: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS)

Brain Scans Spot Possible Clues to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Posted 2 May 2014 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, May 2, 2014 – Seeking better insight into chronic fatigue syndrome, a new brain scan investigation has pinpointed what could be the first evidence of a connection between nerve cell inflammation and the onset of this debilitating and somewhat mysterious illness, researchers say. The finding stems from a small PET scan study, led by Yasuhito Nakatomi of the RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies in Hyogo, Japan. The study involved just nine patients with chronic fatigue syndrome and 10 healthy participants. However, the investigators believe that their initial results are the first to show that neuro-inflammation is a distinct feature of chronic fatigue syndrome. This inflammation affects specific areas of the brain that are commonly linked with the kind of fatigue, pain, depression, and thought-process difficulties long associated with the syndrome, the researchers noted. ... Read more

Related support groups: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS)

Health Tip: Understanding Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Posted 17 Mar 2014 by Drugs.com

-- Chronic fatigue syndrome is a complex disorder that involves extreme tiredness that doesn't go away after rest or sleep. The cause hasn't been identified. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention mentions these common symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome, which should be evaluated by a doctor: Flu-like symptoms that may come and go, accompanied by weakness and extreme fatigue. Fatigue for longer than 24 hours, even after sleep, and after exercise. Aches and pains in the joints and muscles without redness or swelling. Headache, typically of unusual severity or pattern. Sore throat. Tenderness in the lymph nodes of the neck or underarms. Read more

Related support groups: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS)

Many U.S. Teens Struggle With Extreme Fatigue: Survey

Posted 1 May 2013 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 1 – Extreme fatigue is common in U.S. teens and often goes untreated, a new study finds. Researchers surveyed more than 10,000 teens, aged 13 to 18, and found that 3 percent reported having extreme fatigue that had lasted at least three months and was not relieved by rest. Half of the teens with extreme fatigue also had depression or an anxiety disorder. More than half of those with long-term fatigue said they experienced severe or very severe problems in school, family or social situations, according to the study, which was published in the May issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry. Only 14 percent of teens with long-term fatigue alone received any type of treatment for emotional or behavioral symptoms in the previous year, the survey found. Those with depression or an anxiety disorder in addition to long-term fatigue were more likely to have received care than ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Fatigue, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS)

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