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Related terms: Breast Cancer, inflammatory, Cancer, Breast, Carcinoma, Ductal, Carcinoma, Lobular, Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS), Ductal Carcinoma in Situ, DCIS

FDA Approves Lynparza (olaparib tablets) for Germline BRCA-Mutated Metastatic Breast Cancer

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

January 12, 2018 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today expanded the approved use of Lynparza (olaparib tablets) to include the treatment of patients with certain types of breast cancer that have spread (metastasized) and whose tumors have a specific inherited (germline) genetic mutation, making it the first drug in its class (PARP inhibitor) approved to treat breast cancer, and it is the first time any drug has been approved to treat certain patients with metastatic breast cancer who have a “BRCA” gene mutation. Patients are selected for treatment with Lynparza based on an FDA-approved genetic test, called the BRACAnalysis CDx. “This class of drugs has been used to treat advanced, BRCA-mutated ovarian cancer and has now shown efficacy in treating certain types of BRCA-mutated breast cancer,” said Richard Pazdur, M.D., director of the FDA’s Oncology Center of Excellence and actin ... Read more

Related support groups: Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Lynparza, Olaparib

Lynparza (Olaparib), First Treatment Approved for Breast Cancer Caused by Specific Gene Mutation

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 12, 2018 – Lynparza (olaparib) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat spreading breast cancer caused by a BRCA gene mutation. The drug is among a class called poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, which are designed to block an enzyme involved in repairing damaged DNA. The hope is that by blocking the repair of cancer cells, the cells will die and slow or stop tumor growth, the FDA said in a news release Friday. "This class of drugs has been used to treat advanced, BRCA-mutated ovarian cancer and has now shown efficacy in treating certain types of BRCA-mutated breast cancer," said Dr. Richard Pazdur, director of the FDA's Oncology Center of Excellence. "This approval demonstrates the current paradigm of developing drugs that target the underlying genetic causes of cancer, often across cancer types." More than 250,000 women in the United ... Read more

Related support groups: Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Breast Cancer - Palliative, Lynparza, Olaparib

FDA Approves Lynparza (Olaparib), First Drug for Tumors Tied to Breast Cancer Genes

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 12, 2018 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday approved the first drug aimed at treating metastatic breast cancers linked to the BRCA gene mutation. These mutated genes, called BRCA1 and BRCA2, first came to prominence in 2013 when actress and director Angelina Jolie announced she'd undergone a preventive double mastectomy. Jolie said she carried the BRCA1 gene, which greatly raises a woman's odds for breast and ovarian cancers. Now, the FDA says it is expanding approval of Lynparza (olaparib) to include use against BRCA-linked tumors that have spread beyond the breast. Lynparza is one of a group of powerful new cancer drugs known as PARP inhibitors, and it's the first such drug to be approved for use against breast cancer, the FDA noted. Lynparza is already approved to treat certain ovarian cancers. PARP inhibitors have already "been used to treat advanced, ... Read more

Related support groups: Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Breast Cancer - Palliative, Lynparza, Osteolytic Bone Metastases of Breast Cancer

BRCA Breast Cancer Gene Doesn't Affect Patient Survival: Study

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 12, 2018 – Young breast cancer patients with a BRCA gene mutation have the same chances of survival after treatment as those without the mutation, a new study finds. BRCA mutations are inherited and increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancers. Between 45 percent and 90 percent of women with a BRCA mutation develop breast cancer, compared with about 12.5 percent of women in the general population. "Our study is the largest of its kind, and our findings suggest that younger women with breast cancer who have a BRCA mutation have similar survival to women who do not carry the mutation after receiving treatment," said lead researcher Diana Eccles. She is with the University of Southampton and University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, in England. "Women diagnosed with early breast cancer who carry a BRCA mutation are often offered double mastectomies soon after ... Read more

Related support groups: Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Breast Cancer - Palliative, Diagnosis and Investigation, Osteolytic Bone Metastases of Breast Cancer

Dissatisfaction With Breasts May Mean Fewer Self-Checks for Cancer

Posted 6 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 10, 2018 – Women who are unhappy with the size of their breasts – whether too big or too small – may be less likely to perform self-exams to check for signs of breast cancer, new research suggests. These women are also more likely to put off seeing a doctor if they do find a suspicious lump in their breast, the study found. "For women who are dissatisfied with their breast size, having to inspect their breasts may be experienced as a threat to their body image and so they may engage in avoidance behaviors," said study co-author Viren Swami. He's a social psychology professor at Anglia Ruskin University in Cambridge, England. "Breast size dissatisfaction may also activate negative self-conscious emotions such as shame and embarrassment that results in avoiding breast self-examination," Swami said in a university news release. Most of the 384 women in the study admitted ... Read more

Related support groups: Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Breast Cancer - Palliative

FDA Approves Genentech’s Perjeta (Pertuzumab) for Adjuvant Treatment of Specific Type of Early Breast Cancer

Posted 7 days ago by Drugs.com

South San Francisco, CA – December 20, 2017 – Genentech, a member of the Roche Group (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY), today announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Perjeta ® (pertuzumab), in combination with Herceptin® (trastuzumab) and chemotherapy (the Perjeta-based regimen), for adjuvant (after surgery) treatment of HER2-positive early breast cancer (EBC) at high risk of recurrence. People should receive the adjuvant Perjeta-based regimen for one year (up to 18 cycles). The FDA has also converted the previously granted accelerated approval of the Perjeta-based regimen to full approval for neoadjuvant (before surgery) treatment of HER2-positive, locally advanced, inflammatory, or early stage breast cancer (either greater than two centimeters in diameter or node-positive). People receiving the neoadjuvant Perjeta-based regimen should continue Perjeta and H ... Read more

Related support groups: Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Perjeta, Pertuzumab

Screening, Treatment Cuts Breast Cancer Deaths in Half

Posted 7 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 9, 2018 – Breakthroughs in breast cancer screening and treatment have slashed the percentage of women dying from the disease, a new analysis reveals. "Advances in screening and treatment are saving lives," said lead researcher Sylvia Plevritis, a professor of radiology and biomedical data science at the Stanford University School of Medicine. "Here's an example that all this investment in research and discovery has had a real benefit. This has translated into making a difference." Screening and treatment reduced breast cancer deaths by 49 percent in 2012, compared with a 37 percent reduction in 2000, according to the study. Treatments that target specific types of breast cancer have generated the most scientific advancement and, as such, have taken a larger role in saving lives, the researchers found. Better cancer treatments accounted for 63 percent of the reduction in ... Read more

Related support groups: Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Breast Cancer - Palliative, Diagnosis and Investigation

Working Night Shift May Raise Women's Odds for Cancer

Posted 8 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 8, 2018 – Women who pull the night shift regularly might be at greater risk for a number of cancers, new research suggests. "Our study indicates that night-shift work serves as a risk factor for common cancers in women," said study author Xuelei Ma. He is an oncologist in the State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center at West China Medical Center of Sichuan University, China. "These results might help establish and implement effective measures to protect female night-shifters. Long-term night-shift workers should have regular physical examinations and cancer screenings," Ma said in a news release from the American Association for Cancer Research. For the new study, the researchers conducted a review of 61 studies involving almost 4 million people from North America, Europe, Australia and Asia, to look for an association between long-term night-shift work and the ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Cancer, Breast Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Shift Work Sleep Disorder

High Costs Keep Many Cancer Patients From Needed Drugs

Posted 21 Dec 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 21, 2017 – Cancer drugs have become so pricey that U.S. patients often can't afford them, a new study finds. The findings suggest that high out-of-pocket costs may be a barrier to potentially life-saving or life-prolonging treatments, the researchers said, and raise questions about whether patients will be able to take advantage of new cancer treatments. "Imagine leaving your doctor's office with a plan, ready to start treatment, only to find you can't afford it," said study author Jalpa Doshi, from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. "It adds more stress at what is already a stressful and scary time," she said in a UPenn news release. Doshi is a professor of general internal medicine at Penn and director of value-based insurance design initiatives at the university's Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics. The study involved more than ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Brain Tumor, Melanoma

Cancer Survivors Often Face Another Hurdle: Faster Aging

Posted 19 Dec 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 19, 2017 – Treatments that help people beat cancer also can cause them to age prematurely and die sooner, Mayo Clinic researchers report. Cancer survivors naturally age faster than others who haven't had cancer, and are more likely to develop long-term health problems related to aging while they're still relatively young, the study authors said. These ailments can include hormone and gland disorders, heart problems, brittle bones, lung scarring and new cancers. Survivors also are more likely to become frail as the years pass. Childhood cancer survivors' estimated life expectancy is 30 percent lower than that of the general population, and they are three to six times more likely to develop a second cancer, the researchers noted. With the number of cancer survivors growing, the medical profession needs to start paying more attention to how to keep these people healthy ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Breast Cancer - Palliative, History - Radiation Therapy

Many With Early Breast Cancer Are Skipping Chemo

Posted 14 Dec 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 13, 2017 – Fewer women with early stage breast cancer are turning to chemotherapy to fight their disease, a new study finds. "For patients with early stage breast cancer, we've seen a significant decline in chemotherapy use over the last few years without a real change in evidence," said study author Dr. Allison Kurian. She's an associate professor of medicine and of health research and policy at Stanford University. "This likely reflects a change in the culture of how physicians are practicing, and a move toward using tumor biology to guide treatment choices rather than solely relying on clinical measures," Kurian said in a Stanford news release. "We believe this study indicates that physicians are attempting to be more selective in their recommendations and to spare patients toxicity when possible," she said. The researchers looked at nearly 3,000 women treated for ... Read more

Related support groups: Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Breast Cancer, Prevention

Will 'AI' Be Part of Your Health-Care Team?

Posted 12 Dec 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 12, 2017 – Artificial intelligence is assuming a greater role in many walks of life, with research suggesting it may even help doctors diagnose disease. One new study suggests artificial intelligence (AI) might someday detect breast cancer that has spread to the lymph nodes. Researchers found that several computer algorithms outperformed a group of pathologists in analyzing lymph tissue from breast cancer patients. The technology was specifically better at catching small clusters of tumor cells – known as micrometastases. "Micrometastases can easily be missed during the routine examination by pathologists," said lead researcher Babak Ehteshami Bejnordi, of Radboud University Medical Center in the Netherlands. But the algorithms "perform very well in detecting these abnormalities," he said. "I think this is exciting, and will likely be the key element for enhancing the ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation

Has Your Doc Been Touched by Breast Cancer? It Could Influence Care

Posted 12 Dec 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Dec. 11, 2017 – Having a personal connection to breast cancer seems to make doctors more likely to recommend routine breast cancer screenings, a new study finds. A survey of 848 doctors across the United States found they were more likely to recommend routine mammograms for younger and older women if the doctor knew someone who'd had advanced breast cancer and had not undergone breast cancer screening. The person might have been a patient, family member or friend of the doctor. The recommendation for screening was given despite the existence of conflicting guidelines on routine screening for those age groups, the researchers said. The American Cancer Society recommends personalized decisions for women aged 40 to 44, annual screening for women starting at age 45 and biennial screening (every other year) for women 55 and older. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends ... Read more

Related support groups: Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Breast Cancer - Palliative, Diagnosis and Investigation

Just a Little Weight Loss May Cut Breast Cancer Risk

Posted 8 Dec 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 8, 2017 – It's never too late for women to lose weight to lower their breast cancer risk, a new study suggests. Researchers found that a 5 percent or greater weight loss after menopause could lower the odds of breast cancer by about 12 percent. For a 170-pound woman, a 5 percent weight loss would be 8.5 pounds. "A modest weight loss that seems to be sustainable could have important health consequences," said lead study author Dr. Rowan Chlebowski. He's a research professor in the department of medical oncology and therapeutics research at the City of Hope in Duarte, Calif. "These are encouraging findings. You don't have to get to a normal weight to see a benefit, and you don't need to lose a colossal amount of weight. A 5 percent weight loss is achievable on your own," Chlebowski added. Obesity is a known risk factor for breast cancer. But Chlebowski said it hasn't been ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Weight Loss, Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prevention

For Breast Cancer Patients, Less Time on Hormonal Meds?

Posted 7 Dec 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 7, 2017 – Women with earlier-stage breast cancer may be able to spend less time on hormonal therapy without dimming their prognosis, a new study suggests. In a trial of nearly 3,500 patients, researchers found that seven years of hormonal therapy was as effective as 10 years. By the study's end, more than three-quarters of women in both groups were alive and recurrence-free. The results are "important," according to experts attending the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, where the study was released Thursday. "Potentially, there is a large group of patients who don't need 10 years of therapy," said Dr. Susan Domchek, of the University of Pennsylvania's Abramson Cancer Center. Domchek, who was not involved in the study, said decisions around hormonal therapy are often a source of "major discussion and angst" for patients and doctors. Hormonal therapy involves drugs ... Read more

Related support groups: Breast Cancer, Tamoxifen, Arimidex, Femara, Anastrozole, Letrozole, Aromasin, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Exemestane, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Breast Cancer - Palliative, Tamoxifen Hexal, Tamosin, Nolvadex, Testolactone, Soltamox, Tamone, Emblon, Tamoxen, Genox

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