Skip to Content

Join the 'Alzheimer's Disease' group to help and get support from people like you.

Alzheimer's Disease News

Related terms: Presenile Dementia, SDAT, Senile dementia Alzheimer's Type, Alzheimers

Could New 'Brain Training' Program Help Prevent Dementia?

Posted 5 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 17, 2017 – In what is being billed as a first, researchers report that healthy seniors who tried a new brain-training program were less likely to develop dementia down the road. "Everyone with a brain is at risk of dementia," noted study author Jerri Edwards. But "this is the first treatment ever shown in a clinical trial to make a difference." Edwards is a professor in the department of psychiatry and behavioral neurosciences at the University of South Florida. In essence, the program tries to speed thinking by giving seniors the task of distinguishing between a series of ever-changing objects on a computer screen – both in the center and periphery of their vision. Over time, the objects appear more quickly, and look more similar to one another. This makes the task increasingly difficult, with the aim being to boost the individual's ability to rapidly and accurately ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Diagnosis and Investigation

Millions Could Miss Out on a Potential Alzheimer's Breakthrough

Posted 8 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 15, 2017 – Even if researchers were to find a groundbreaking new treatment for Alzheimer's disease, millions of people might not benefit from it, new research reveals. That's because the U.S. health care system doesn't have the ability to quickly implement a newly approved treatment on a widespread scale, according to a report from the RAND Corporation. For instance, there aren't enough doctors to diagnose all the people with early signs of dementia who would be good candidates for such a treatment, the researchers explained. In addition, scanners used to detect the disease are in short supply, and there aren't enough treatment centers that could administer the therapy to patients. An estimated 5.5 million Americans are currently living with Alzheimer's disease. By 2040, that number is expected to jump to 11.6 million, according to the study authors. "While significant ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Diagnosis and Investigation

Sleep Apnea May Boost Alzheimer's Risk

Posted 13 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 10, 2017 – If your sleep is continually disrupted by a condition called sleep apnea, you might face a higher chance of developing Alzheimer's down the road. So claims a new study that has linked sleep apnea with an increase in the development of amyloid plaque in the brain, a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. The researchers found that the more serious the sleep apnea was, the more plaque accumulated. "Sleep apnea is very common among the elderly, and many aren't aware they have it," said senior researcher Dr. Ricardo Osorio. He is an assistant professor of psychiatry at New York University School of Medicine in New York City. An estimated 30 percent to 80 percent of the elderly suffer from sleep apnea, depending on how it's defined, the study authors noted. Although none of the participants developed Alzheimer's over the two years of the study, those with sleep apnea ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Sleep Apnea, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Diagnosis and Investigation, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome

An Aging Heart May Weaken Memory

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8, 2017 – A decline in the pumping ability of an older person's heart can lower blood flow to their brain's memory center, new research has found. The study involved 314 people, who averaged 73 years old and did not have heart failure, stroke or dementia. Nearly 40 percent of them had mild cognitive impairment, which increases the risk for dementia, including Alzheimer's disease. All participants underwent tests to determine how much blood their heart pumped relative to their body size. They also had MRI scans to assess blood flow in the brain. "Our findings show that when the heart does not pump blood as effectively, it may lead to reduced blood flow in the right and left temporal lobes, areas of the brain that process memories," said study author Angela Jefferson. She directs Vanderbilt University Medical Center's Memory & Alzheimer's Center, in Nashville. "What is ... Read more

Related support groups: Ischemic Stroke, Heart Failure, Congestive Heart Failure, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Transient Ischemic Attack, Left Ventricular Dysfunction, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Lewy Body Dementia

New Finding Hints at Clue to Dementia

Posted 3 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 3, 2017 – Inflammation in middle age may increase the risk for brain shrinkage and dementia in old age, a new study suggests. The researchers tested more than 1,600 people for five "biomarkers" of inflammation in their blood when they were, on average, 53 years old. About 24 years later, the participants were given brain scans and a memory test. Compared with people who had no elevated levels of the biomarkers, those with elevated levels for three or more biomarkers had an average of 5 percent lower volume in the hippocampus and other areas of the brain associated with Alzheimer's disease. They also had lower scores on the memory test. The study was published online Nov. 1 in the journal Neurology. "These results suggest that inflammation in midlife may be an early contributor to the brain changes that are associated with Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia," ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Inflammatory Conditions, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Diagnosis and Investigation, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features

Resilient Brain Connections May Help Against Alzheimer's

Posted 2 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 2, 2017 – Certain pieces of brain structure may make some people less likely to develop Alzheimer's disease. That's the conclusion of a new study that could lead to new ways to prevent or slow the memory-destroying disease, researchers said. For the study, the researchers analyzed brain samples from patients at memory clinics and found that the presence of healthy dendritic spines (connections between neurons) provide protection against Alzheimer's in people whose brains have proteins associated with the disease. The findings, published recently in the Annals of Neurology, are the first of their kind, the study authors said. "One of the precursors of Alzheimer's is the development in the brain of proteins called amyloid and tau, which we refer to as the pathology of Alzheimer's," said the study's lead author, Jeremy Herskowitz. He's an assistant professor with the ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Head Imaging

Blood Thinners May Also Protect Brains of A-Fib Patients

Posted 26 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 26, 2017 – Blood thinners may pull double duty for people with the heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation: New research suggests they help prevent dementia as well as stroke. Because atrial fibrillation increases the risk for stroke, people with the condition are often prescribed blood thinners (also known as anticoagulants) to prevent blood clots that can cause a stroke. Atrial fibrillation also increases the risk for dementia. During the study, more than 26,000 of the 440,000 participants, all with atrial fibrillation, were diagnosed with dementia. At the time they joined the study, about half of the participants were taking oral anticoagulants, such as warfarin, Eliquis (apixaban), Pradaxa (dabigatran), Savaysa (edoxaban) or Xarelto (rivaroxaban). The researchers found that people taking anticoagulants were 29 percent less likely to develop dementia than were those ... Read more

Related support groups: Warfarin, Atrial Fibrillation, Coumadin, Xarelto, Dementia, Parkinson's Disease, Pradaxa, Eliquis, Alzheimer's Disease, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Rivaroxaban, Apixaban, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arixtra, Dabigatran, Jantoven, Fondaparinux, Savaysa, Bevyxxa, Dicumarol

America's Dementia Caregivers Cite Stresses, Rewards

Posted 25 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 25, 2017 – It's tough, often thankless work done by millions of Americans every day. And people who tend to a loved one with dementia say they're often overburdened, but the task has its rewards, too. Those are just some of the findings from a new University of Michigan survey, the National Poll on Healthy Aging, which tallied the experiences of dementia caregivers. About 5.5 million Americans are currently living with Alzheimer's disease, according to the Alzheimer's Association. It estimates that the bulk of their care – 83 percent – falls on unpaid family members. Alzheimer's is the most common form of dementia. It's no secret that family caregivers face heavy demands. However, the new survey turned up some surprises, said Erica Solway, of the University of Michigan's Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation. A striking finding, she said, was that 45 percent ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features, Drug-Induced Dementia

Dance Your Way to a Healthier Aging Brain

Posted 13 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 12, 2017 – Dance classes may beat traditional exercise when it comes to improving older adults' balance – and it might enhance brain areas related to memory and learning along the way. That's the finding of a small study that compared dance lessons against standard exercise – including brisk walking – among 52 healthy seniors. Over a year and a half, older adults who took weekly dance classes showed gains in their balancing ability. There were no such improvements in the traditional exercise group. Researchers also found hints that all those mambos and cha-chas had extra brain benefits. Seniors in both groups showed growth in the hippocampus – a brain structure that's involved in memory and learning. But the dancers showed changes in more areas of the hippocampus. Patrick Muller, one of the researchers on the study, suggested an explanation: The "multimodal" nature ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Weight Loss, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia

Health Tip: Identifying Vascular Dementia

Posted 12 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Vascular dementia is the second most common form of dementia, behind Alzheimer's disease. Vascular dementia typically occurs after a stroke, but it can occur for other reasons. The U.S. National Institute on Aging identifies three common forms: Multi-infarct dementia – This occurs after a series of small strokes that damage brain cells. Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) – This inherited form results in a thickening of the walls of small- and medium-sized blood vessels, eventually stemming the flow of blood to the brain. Subcortical vascular dementia, also calledBinswanger's disease – This rare form involves extensive damage to the small blood vessels and nerve fibers that make up white matter, the part of the brain believed critical for relaying messages between regions. Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features, Arteriosclerotic Dementia w/ Depressive Features

One Type of Dementia Is Especially Costly

Posted 6 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 5, 2017 – A type of early onset dementia known as frontotemporal degeneration appears to take an even more punishing toll on family finances than Alzheimer's disease, a new report suggests. Frontotemporal degeneration (FTD) is the most common type of dementia to strike men and women under 60, the study team noted. The investigation revealed that families caring for a patient with FTD face an annual bill of nearly $120,000, on average. That's roughly twice the cost of caring for a senior with Alzheimer's, the researchers said. "For years, we have known about the extraordinary economic burden shouldered by FTD caregivers, but now we have the numbers to prove it," said Susan Dickinson, CEO for the Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration. "This study shows that the financial toll of FTD is even more devastating than we imagined." The study was led by Dr. James Galvin, of ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Diagnosis and Investigation, Lewy Body Dementia

High Blood Pressure in 40s a Dementia Risk for Women?

Posted 5 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 4, 2017 – Women who develop high blood pressure in their 40s could be much more vulnerable to dementia later in life, a new study suggests. That increased risk could run as high as 73 percent, the researchers reported, but the same did not hold true for men. These new findings suggest that high blood pressure can start playing a role in brain health even earlier than previously thought, said lead researcher Paola Gilsanz, a postdoctoral fellow with the Kaiser Permanente Northern California Division of Research in Oakland. Prior studies have linked high blood pressure with dementia, but "it wasn't clear if hypertension before one's 50s was a risk factor," Gilsanz said. A healthy circulatory system is key to a health brain, said Keith Fargo, director of scientific programs and outreach for the Alzheimer's Association. "The brain is a very metabolically active organ in the ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Diagnosis and Investigation, Lewy Body Dementia, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Alcoholic Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features

Failing Sense of Smell Tied to Dementia Risk

Posted 29 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 29, 2017 – Older adults who've lost their sense of smell appear to have an increased risk of dementia, a new study suggests. The long-term study included nearly 3,000 participants, aged 57 to 85, who were tested on their ability to identify five common odors. At least four of the five odors were correctly identified by 78 percent of the participants, the researchers found. In addition, 14 percent identified three of the odors, 5 percent identified only two of the odors, 2 percent identified only one, and 1 percent could not identify any of the odors. Five years after the test, the participants who weren't able to identify at least four of the five odors were more than twice as likely to have dementia, compared to those with a normal sense of smell, the researchers said. Nearly all of the participants who couldn't identify a single odor had been diagnosed with dementia, ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features, Alcoholic Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia

A More Accurate Predictor for Alzheimer's?

Posted 29 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 29, 2017 – A new test that checks for multiple gene variants linked with Alzheimer's disease may be more effective than testing for a single genetic variant, a new study suggests. The genetic variant APOE E4 is regarded as the strongest genetic predictor of whether a person is likely to develop the memory-robbing disease. But it's present in only 10 to 15 percent of people. And recent research suggests its impact has been overestimated, the study authors said. They developed a test that estimates the risk of Alzheimer's in the 85 to 90 percent of people who don't have at least one copy of APOE E4 but still have other gene variants that put them at risk of Alzheimer's. The test is called the polygenic hazard score (PHS). The researchers reviewed five years of data from nearly 1,100 Americans without dementia. They concluded that the new test could predict how long it would ... Read more

Related support groups: Alzheimer's Disease, Aricept, Donepezil, Diagnosis and Investigation, Namzaric, Aricept ODT, Donepezil/memantine

Health Tip: Exercise Boosts Brain Metabolism

Posted 27 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

-- A new study in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, supported by the U.S. National Institute on Aging, finds a connection between moderate exercise and increased cerebral blood-sugar (glucose) metabolism. A prominent symptom of Alzheimer's and a predictor of cognitive decline in older adults has been a decrease in brain metabolism. The University of Wisconsin study found a boost in blood sugar metabolism in the brain's hippocampus, an area that's key to learning and memory. The more time a person spent exercising, the greater the benefit, the research found. Read more

Related support groups: Alzheimer's Disease, Diagnosis and Investigation

Page 1 2 3 ... Next

Ask a Question

Further Information

Related Condition Support Groups

Dementia

Related Drug Support Groups

Namenda, Aricept, donepezil, Exelon, vitamin e, memantine, Namenda XR, galantamine, rivastigmine, view more... etanercept, Axona, Namzaric, Hydergine, Alpha E, Razadyne, E-Gems, E-600, Aqua Gem-E, tacrine, caprylidene, Gerimal, Reminyl, Hydergine LC, Aqua-E, E-400 Clear, Aquavite-E, Nutr-E-Sol, Vita-Plus E Natural, Amino-Opti-E, E Pherol, ergoloid mesylates, Aricept ODT, Razadyne ER, Cognex, donepezil / memantine, Aquasol E