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Related terms: Presenile Dementia, SDAT, Senile dementia Alzheimer's Type, Alzheimers

Hospital-Related Delirium May Help Worsen Dementia

Posted 3 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 18, 2017 – Hospitalization-related delirium may speed mental decline in patients with dementia, a new study suggests. Delirium affects about one-fourth of older hospital patients and causes confusion and disorientation. British researchers looked at brain samples from nearly 1,000 people from the United Kingdom and Finland. They were 65 and older when they died. Records of their last 10 years of memory and thinking abilities, as well as episodes of delirium, were examined. Although the study couldn't prove cause and effect, the researchers found that memory changes were most severe among those with a history of hospital-related delirium and brain abnormalities indicating Alzheimer's disease or other types of dementia. "If delirium is causing brain injury in the short and long-term, then we must increase our efforts to diagnose, prevent and treat delirium. Ultimately, ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Agitation, Psychosis, Agitated State, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Drug-Induced Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia

High Blood Pressure May Not Be All Bad in the Elderly: Study

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 17, 2017 – Developing high blood pressure in very old age may provide some protection from dementia, a new study suggests. In middle age, high blood pressure – also called hypertension – boosts dementia risk later in life, said study lead researcher Maria Corrada. It also raises your risk for heart attack and stroke. But its onset in the eighth or ninth decade of life was linked to lower risk of mental decline in one's 90s, her team found. "Hypertension in the very old is not detrimental for mental health," said Corrada, a professor of neurology and epidemiology at the University of California, Irvine. Several factors may help explain the apparent association between late-life high blood pressure and lower dementia risk, Corrada said. For one, as people age, blood pressure may need to increase to keep blood flowing to the brain for normal functioning. "It's a matter of ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Metoprolol, Atenolol, Losartan, Propranolol, Hydrochlorothiazide, Benicar, Diovan, Dementia, Bystolic, Carvedilol, Alzheimer's Disease, Bisoprolol, Cozaar, Coreg, Micardis, Valsartan, Inderal, Sotalol

Common Viruses a Deadly Threat at Nursing Homes

Posted 8 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 13, 2017 – Common viruses pose a serious threat in nursing homes, often sabotaging standard infection control measures, a new case study suggests. "Long-term care facilities have unique challenges. Infection-control policies from acute care hospitals cannot simply be mirrored in this setting and expected to work," said study lead author Dr. Schaefer Spires. His report details a 16-day outbreak of two viruses – respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human metapneumovirus (HMPV) – that swept through a long-term dementia ward in Tennessee. Nearly three-quarters of the patients became sick and five died. "RSV and HMPV are viruses that need to be taken as seriously as we take the flu, especially in older adults," said Spires, an assistant professor of infectious diseases at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville. RSV causes infections of the lungs and ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Cough, Dementia, Cold Symptoms, Alzheimer's Disease, Upper Respiratory Tract Infection, Sore Throat, Cough and Nasal Congestion, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Viral Infection, Respiratory Tract Disease, Respiratory Syncytial Virus

Link Seen Between Concussions and Alzheimer's

Posted 9 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 12, 2017 – Could concussions speed up the mental decline of people already at risk for Alzheimer's disease? In a new study, researchers examined 160 U.S. veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. The investigators found that concussions seem to accelerate Alzheimer's disease-related brain deterioration and mental decline in people who are at genetic risk for the disease. However, the study did not prove that concussions cause Alzheimer's risk to rise. "We found that having a concussion was associated with lower cortical thickness in brain regions that are the first to be affected in Alzheimer's disease," said study corresponding author Jasmeet Hayes. She is an assistant professor of psychiatry at Boston University School of Medicine. "Our results suggest that when combined with genetic factors, concussions may be associated with accelerated cortical thickness and memory ... Read more

Related support groups: Alzheimer's Disease, Head Injury, Head Injury with Intracranial Hemorrhage, Head Injury w/ Intracranial Hemorrhage and Loss of Consciousness, Head Injury with Loss of Consciousness

Can Teeth Repair Themselves Without Fillings?

Posted 12 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 9, 2017 – Teeth might someday repair themselves using their own stem cells – eliminating the need for conventional fillings, researchers report. Although still in the laboratory stage, a new method tested in mice indicates that a drug called Tideglusib can stimulate teeth to fix decay. "Teeth have a limited ability to repair themselves by activating their own stem cells," said lead researcher Paul Sharpe. That "natural repair is greatly enhanced by delivery" of Tideglusib, added Sharpe. He is a professor of craniofacial biology at the Dental Institute at King's College London in England. Restoration of the tooth with its own natural material "means full tooth vitality and structure are maintained," Sharpe explained. "A new era of regenerate dentistry is on its way, where new dental treatments use an understanding of the biology and physiology of the tooth," Sharpe said. ... Read more

Related support groups: Oral and Dental Conditions, Xerostomia, Toothache, Alzheimer's Disease, Dental Abscess, Periodontitis, Prevention of Dental Caries

Does Living Near Major Roads Boost Dementia Risk?

Posted 17 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 4, 2017 – Want to cut your chances for Alzheimer's disease and other dementias? A new study suggests that picking a home far from major roadways might help. The Canadian study found that people who lived relatively close to busy traffic had a slightly higher risk for dementia. More specifically, this type of mental decline was more common among those who lived within about 160 feet of a major street, the study found. And the closer people lived to heavy traffic, the stronger the association. The research, published Jan. 4 in The Lancet, couldn't prove cause-and-effect, only an association, the researchers stressed. However, "our study suggests that busy roads could be a source of environmental stressors that could give rise to the onset of dementia," study author Hong Chen, with Public Health Ontario, said in a journal news release. One neurologist who reviewed the ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features, Drug-Induced Dementia

Plant-Based Diets Score Big for Healthy Weight Loss

Posted 17 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 4, 2017 – If you've resolved to eat healthy and lose weight in 2017, a new report suggests the DASH diet may be your best bet. For the seventh year in a row, U.S. News & World Report has named the plant-based eating plan as the best choice overall, followed by the Mediterranean diet, up from fourth place last year. DASH stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, but its benefits go beyond preventing high blood pressure, the report found. The DASH and the Mediterranean diets, as well as most of the other recommended diets, focus on eating whole grains, fruits, vegetables, low- or no-fat dairy, lean meats, poultry and fish. They also recommend nuts, seeds and legumes (beans). But these diets limit or exclude most fats and sweets, and recommend modest portions, according to Dr. David Katz. He is president of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine and a member ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Obesity, Hypertension, Heart Disease, Weight Loss, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Diabetes Mellitus, Ischemic Heart Disease, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance

Artists' Brushstrokes May Offer First Hints of Brain Disease

Posted 29 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 29, 2016 – An artist's work may reveal early signs of progressive brain disease, a new study suggests. Researchers examined the brushstrokes in nearly 2,100 paintings from seven famous artists. Two (Salvador Dali and Norval Morrisseau) had Parkinson's disease, two (James Brooks and Willem de Kooning) had Alzheimer's disease, and three (Marc Chagall, Pablo Picasso and Claude Monet) had no known neurodegenerative disorders. The results showed clear patterns of change in the works of the artists with neurodegenerative disorders, compared to those with no brain diseases. "Art has long been embraced by psychologists an effective method of improving the quality of life for those persons living with cognitive disorders," study author Alex Forsythe said. Forsythe is a senior lecturer and director of studies in applied psychology at the University of Liverpool in England. "We ... Read more

Related support groups: Alzheimer's Disease

Antipsychotic Drugs May Up Risk of Early Death in Alzheimer's Patients

Posted 27 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 27, 2016 – Taking antipsychotic drugs significantly increases the risk of premature death among Alzheimer's patients, a new study indicates. Researchers analyzed data from almost 58,000 people in Finland diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease between 2005 and 2011. Slightly more than a quarter of the Alzheimer's patients took antipsychotic drugs. The study found they had a 60 percent higher risk of death than those who didn't take the drugs. The risk of death was highest when patients first started taking antipsychotics, but the increased risk persisted with long-term use of the drugs. Patients who took two or more antipsychotic drugs at the same time were nearly twice as likely to die early than those who took one antipsychotic. Although the study found an association between antipsychotic drug use and a higher risk of dying, it cannot prove a cause-and-effect link. But, the ... Read more

Related support groups: Seroquel, Abilify, Lithium, Latuda, Zyprexa, Risperdal, Risperidone, Saphris, Dementia, Geodon, Quetiapine, Seroquel XR, Alzheimer's Disease, Agitation, Olanzapine, Haldol, Invega, Compazine, Clozapine, Rexulti

Test Predicting Alzheimer's Would Be Welcome, Survey Finds

Posted 13 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 13, 2016 – If a test could tell them they were going to develop Alzheimer's disease, most American seniors would take it, a new study finds. Stanford University researchers asked 875 people aged 65 and older if they would take a free, accurate test to predict their future risk of the progressive brain disorder. Three-quarters said they would take such a test. When asked what they would do if they knew they would develop Alzheimer's, 87 percent of the participants said they would discuss health plans with loved ones. Eight out of 10 said they would make plans for their future care and/or make a living will. Only 15 percent said they had already done so, according to the study. Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia. The results were published Dec. 12 in the journal Alzheimer's Research and Therapy. "We found that interest in a predictive test for ... Read more

Related support groups: Alzheimer's Disease, Diagnosis and Investigation

Beta Blockers May Not Be Best Heart Drugs for Dementia Patients

Posted 12 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Dec. 12, 2016 – Beta blocker drugs are often the go-to medication for people who've survived a heart attack. But a new study suggests that they may not be the medicine of choice for nursing home residents with dementia. Taking the drugs reduced the risk of death during the study period by about a quarter, the researchers said. But the drugs were also associated with 34 percent higher risk that a patient with moderate or severe dementia would be unable to independently perform the functions of daily life. One heart expert who reviewed the findings said the study supports the notion that there's no "one-size-fits-all" approach to cardiovascular care. The findings highlight "the importance of personalizing medical care for an individual elderly patient following a heart attack," said Dr. Kevin Marzo. He is chief of cardiology at Winthrop-University Hospital in Mineola, N.Y. ... Read more

Related support groups: Metoprolol, Atenolol, Propranolol, Dementia, Bystolic, Carvedilol, Alzheimer's Disease, Bisoprolol, Coreg, Inderal, Sotalol, Toprol-XL, Lopressor, Timolol, Nadolol, Tenormin, Labetalol, Metoprolol Succinate ER, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Nebivolol

Whether Statins Cut Alzheimer's Risk May Depend on Gender, Race

Posted 12 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Dec. 12, 2016 – Could cholesterol-fighting statins fend off Alzheimer's disease? A new, large study suggests that if they do have that power, it may depend on the specific statin, and the gender and race or ethnicity of the person taking it. For example, black men appeared to gain no benefit from taking any statin, while white women may lower their risk regardless of which statin they take, the researchers said. The findings don't prove that statins reduce the chances of developing Alzheimer's. And if they do shrink the risk, the effect seems to be small. Still, "those with high exposure to statins had a reduced risk of [Alzheimer's disease] compared to those with low exposure. And it varied by type of statin and for men, women and for different racial and ethnic individuals," said study author Julie Zissimopoulos. She is associate director of the Schaeffer Center for Health ... Read more

Related support groups: Lipitor, Simvastatin, Crestor, Atorvastatin, Pravastatin, Alzheimer's Disease, Zocor, Lovastatin, Rosuvastatin, Pravachol, Livalo, Red Yeast Rice, Caduet, Lescol, Lescol XL, Mevacor, Atorvastatin/Ezetimibe, Amlodipine/Atorvastatin, Fluvastatin, Liptruzet

Was Football Safer Back in the Day?

Posted 12 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Dec. 12, 2016 – In a finding that suggests football used to be a less dangerous sport, a small study shows that men who played in high school in the 1950s and 1960s may not be at increased risk for dementia or memory problems. Nor did they show increased rates of Parkinson's disease or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease. The study used a small group of men, the researchers acknowledged. But, they added, the results are in line with an earlier study that examined men who'd played high school football in the 1940s and 1950s. "What we can say is, for that era, football did not increase the risks of neurodegenerative disease compared with other sports," said senior researcher Dr. Rodolfo Savica, a neurologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. That might sound surprising, given evidence that former professional football players can face ... Read more

Related support groups: Parkinson's Disease, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Parkinsonian Tremor, Parkinsonism, Lewy Body Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia

Alzheimer's Patients' Use of Painkilling Patches Cause for Concern

Posted 9 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 8, 2016 – Long-term use of powerful opioid painkillers may be common among Alzheimer's disease patients and could be a cause for concern, researchers report. Researchers analyzed data from more than 67,000 Alzheimer's disease patients in Finland. They found that 7 percent had used opioids for more than six months for non-cancer pain relief. One-third of patients who began using opioids became long-term users, and researchers found a strong link between opioid skin patches and long-term use. While rates of long-term opioid use was about the same as in the general population, long-term use of skin patches was twice as common among Alzheimer's patients, the study showed. People in the general population more often took pills. The University of Eastern Finland researchers also found that long-term opioid use together with benzodiazepines was common. They said the finding is ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Xanax, Oxycodone, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Tramadol, OxyContin, Klonopin, Fentanyl, Clonazepam, Opiate Dependence, Morphine, Ativan, Valium, Codeine, Chronic Pain, Opana, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, Subutex

Aerobic Exercise May Help Guard Against Dementia

Posted 30 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 30, 2016 – Aerobic exercise may strengthen memory and thinking skills in older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a small study suggests. People with mild cognitive impairment are at increased risk for Alzheimer's disease. The study included 16 people, average age 63, who did aerobic workouts such as on a treadmill, stationary bike or elliptical training. They worked out four times a week for six months. There was also a control group of 19 people, average age 67, who did stretching exercises four times a week for six months but no aerobic activity. All of the participants had mild cognitive impairment. After six months, brain scans revealed that those in the aerobic exercise group had greater increases in brain volume than those in the stretching group, the researchers said. Those in the exercise group also showed significant improvement in thinking and ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features

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