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Related terms: Presenile Dementia, SDAT, Senile dementia Alzheimer's Type, Alzheimers

Study Links Disasters to Dementia

Posted 14 hours ago by

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 – Earthquakes, floods and other natural disasters may raise dementia risk for seniors forced to leave their homes, a new study suggests. "In the aftermath of disasters, most people focus on mental health issues like PTSD," said study author Hiroyuki Hikichi, a research fellow at Harvard University's School of Public Health, in Boston. "But our study suggests that cognitive decline is also an important issue," Hikichi said in a university news release. Relocation to a temporary shelter after a disaster may have the unintended effect of separating people not just from their homes but from their neighbors – and both may speed up mental decline among vulnerable people, Hikichi's team noted. Researchers looked at nearly 3,600 survivors of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan. All were 65 and older. The rate of dementia in this group was 4.1 percent before the ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Diagnosis and Investigation, Lewy Body Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia

Stronger Muscles May Pump Up Your Memory

Posted 1 day 12 hours ago by

MONDAY, Oct. 24, 2016 – Boosting muscle strength may boost brain function in people with mild memory and thinking problems, a new study finds. The research included 100 people aged 55 to 86. All had mild memory and thinking problems (mild cognitive impairment). The study volunteers who did weight training twice a week for six months to at least 80 percent of their maximum strength showed significant improvements in mental function. The benefits lasted for at least a year after their supervised weight-lifting sessions ended, the study showed. The results were published Oct. 24 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. "What we found in this follow-up study is that the improvement in cognition [mental] function was related to their muscle strength gains," said study lead author Yorgi Mavros, of the faculty of health sciences at the University of Sydney, Australia. "The stronger ... Read more

Related support groups: Muscle Pain, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment

Exercise May Help People Who Already Have Memory Loss

Posted 7 days ago by

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19, 2016 – Older people who have memory and thinking problems may get a slight benefit from exercise, a new study suggests. People who exercised showed some improvement on a test of thinking and memory skills compared with those who didn't exercise, the Canadian researchers found. "We found that three times a week of moderate intense aerobic exercise, such as brisk walking, significantly improved cognitive function in older adults with impaired cognitive function due to disease affecting the small blood vessels in the brain," said lead researcher Teresa Liu-Ambrose. She's an associate professor at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. The people in the study had mental decline caused by narrowing of blood vessels in the brain, which is the second most common cause of dementia after Alzheimer's disease, Liu-Ambrose said. Although the improvement in mental ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment

Health Tip: Health Tip: Risk Factors for Malnutrition

Posted 9 days ago by

-- Certain risk factors make you more prone than others to malnutrition, which doesn't necessarily come from lack of food. It's possible to be obese and not get enough nutrients (malnourishment) at the same time, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics says. According to the academy, here are common risk factors for malnutrition: Hospitalization. Advanced age, particularly if accompanied by dementia. Dental health problems. Loss of appetite. Serious head injury. Eating disorder. Serious infection. Organ failure. Read more

Related support groups: Weight Loss, Oral and Dental Conditions, Xerostomia, Dementia, Toothache, Binge Eating Disorder, Alzheimer's Disease, Head Injury, Eating Disorder, Gingivitis, Anorexia, Dental Abscess, Bulimia, Weight Loss/Failure to Thrive, Periodontitis, Anorexia nervosa, Prevention of Dental Caries, Head Injury w/ Intracranial Hemorrhage and Loss of Consciousness, Lewy Body Dementia, Anorexia/Feeding Problems

More Evidence Menopause 'Brain Fog' Is Real

Posted 14 days ago by

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 – Those memory lapses many women notice around menopause are real, and they can begin at a relatively young age, researchers report. It's common for women going through menopause to complain of what researchers sometimes call "brain fog" – forgetfulness, and difficulty concentrating and thinking clearly. And while those complaints are subjective, a number of studies have also shown they can be objectively detected. Researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston said the new study builds on that objective evidence. It found that, yes, a woman's performance on certain memory tasks tends to dip as her estrogen levels drop – and it happens during the average age range of menopause: 45 to 55. Menopause is defined as when a woman's menstrual period stops, confirmed when she has missed her period ... Read more

Related support groups: Hot Flashes, Menopausal Disorders, Alzheimer's Disease, Postmenopausal Symptoms, Perimenopausal Symptoms, Mild Cognitive Impairment

Sudden Drops in Blood Pressure Tied to Higher Odds for Dementia

Posted 15 days ago by

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 – There seems to be an association between sudden drops in blood pressure upon standing up – a condition called orthostatic hypotension – and an increased risk for dementia, according to a new study. The study of 6,000 Dutch people could only point to an association between sudden low blood pressure and dementia, and couldn't prove cause-and-effect. However, a geriatrician in the United States said the link is worth investigating. "The study adds to the increasing body of knowledge that links cerebral blood flow to cognitive [thinking] disorders," said Dr. Irving Gomolin, chief of geriatric medicine at Winthrop-University Hospital in Mineola, N.Y. The new study was led by Arfan Ikram and Frank Wolters, of Erasmus Medical Center in the Netherlands. They analyzed 24 years of data from more than 6,000 people and found that those with orthostatic hypotension – low ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Hypotension, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features

Mars-Bound Astronauts Could Face Dementia Risk, Study Contends

Posted 15 days ago by

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 – President Barack Obama's declaration Tuesday to send astronauts to Mars and back by the 2030s might come with health risks to the space travelers, a new study suggests. The study, which was done with rodents, suggests that astronauts traveling to Mars could be at risk for developing dementia because of high levels of cosmic ray exposure. It's a condition the study authors have dubbed "space brain." Researchers found that rodents exposed to highly energetic charged particles – similar to galactic cosmic ray exposure faced by astronauts on lengthy space flights – developed long-term brain damage that led to mental impairment and dementia. The effects included significant levels of brain inflammation and damage to neurons, the researchers said. It's important to note, however, that animal studies frequently fail to produce similar results in humans. The rodents ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Diagnosis and Investigation, Dementia with Depressive Features

Animal Study Hints at Gene Therapy's Possible Promise for Alzheimer's

Posted 16 days ago by

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 – Gene therapy might one day offer a way to prevent and treat Alzheimer's disease, new research in mice suggests. Scientists at Imperial College London used a modified virus to deliver a gene called PGC1-alpha into the brain cells of mice. Previous research suggests this gene may prevent the formation of a protein called amyloid-beta peptide. It's the main component of amyloid plaques, the sticky clumps of protein in the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients. These plaques are thought to cause brain cell death. These very early findings could lead to a way of preventing Alzheimer's or stopping it in the early stages, according to study senior author Magdalena Sastre. Alzheimer's is the most common type of dementia. It causes memory loss, confusion, and changes in mood and personality. There is no cure. "There are many hurdles to overcome, and at the moment the ... Read more

Related support groups: Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Diagnosis and Investigation

High Blood Pressure May Hike Dementia Risk

Posted 16 days ago by

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 – High blood pressure, particularly in middle age, might open the door to dementia, the American Heart Association warns in a new scientific statement. Dementia affects some 30 million to 40 million people worldwide. That number is expected to triple by 2050, as the world's population ages and treatments remain elusive, the association noted. "People with high blood pressure tend to have more dementia," said statement author Dr. Costantino Iadecola. He is a professor of neurology and neuroscience at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City. Whether controlling high blood pressure ("hypertension") reduces the odds of developing dementia, however, has not been scientifically proven, he said. "There are a lot of small observational studies that looked at people who were treated for blood pressure and, generally, there was an improvement in cognition [thinking ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Lewy Body Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia

Study Finds Fault With ICU Treatment of Dementia Patients

Posted 16 days ago by

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 – A new study raises red flags about the use of ventilators among dementia patients in intensive care units. Researchers analyzed data from about 635,000 hospitalizations of U.S. nursing home patients with advanced dementia. Between 2000 and 2013, ventilator use among these patients, whose average age was 84, nearly doubled at the 2,600 hospitals studied. But more than 80 percent of the patients died within a year, the study found. The results suggest ventilators are being overused, leading to unnecessary patient suffering and higher health care costs, according to the authors of the study published Oct. 10 in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine. "These findings call for new efforts to ensure that the use of mechanical ventilation is consistent with patient's goals of care and their clinical condition," said corresponding author Dr. Joan Teno. She is a professor of ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Assisted Ventilation Therapy, Lewy Body Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia

Women's Memory Advantage Might Skew Alzheimer's Diagnosis

Posted 5 Oct 2016 by

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5, 2016 – Early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease in women may be more difficult than in men because older women tend to retain better verbal memory, according to new research. The findings suggest that memory tests for Alzheimer's may need to be adjusted for this gender difference, said a team led by Erin Sundermann of the University of California, San Diego. "Women perform better than men on tests of verbal memory throughout life, which may give them a buffer of protection against losing their verbal memory skills in the precursor stages of Alzheimer's disease, known as mild cognitive impairment," explained Sundermann. She conducted the research while at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City. Sundermann said the findings are important "because verbal memory tests are used to diagnose people with Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment, so women ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Diagnosis and Investigation

1 in 6 Younger Americans Wants to Die Before 80

Posted 1 Sep 2016 by

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 31, 2016 – The fear of growing old may be stronger than the fear of death among many Americans, a new survey suggests. About one in six young and middle-aged adults in the United States wants to die before age 80, according to researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health in New York City. And negative views of old age are a key reason, the study authors said. The telephone survey of more than 1,600 people aged 18 to 64 also found: One-third hope to reach their 80s (which is close to the current average life expectancy in the United States). One-quarter hope to live into their 90s. The rest hope to reach 100 or older, with blacks more likely to say they hope to live a century or more. Hispanics, and those who did not identify as white, black or Hispanic, were more likely to say they hope to die before reaching their 80s. People with negative ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment

Fallout From 9/11 May Include Early Dementia

Posted 30 Aug 2016 by

TUESDAY, Aug. 30, 2016 – The 9/11 attack on the World Trade Center continues to the ravage the minds of those who responded to the Twin Towers collapse, new research shows. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) experienced by many rescuers and other first responders now appears linked to mental decline and dementia, the study authors found. "People with PTSD, regardless from where they get it, are more likely to have cognitive impairment earlier," said lead researcher Sean Clouston, referring to memory and thinking abnormalities. About one-fifth of the World Trade Center responders developed PTSD, according to background notes with the study. "World Trade Center PTSD is associated with potential cognitive impairment, and cognitive impairment is a risk factor for dementia," said Clouston, an assistant professor of family population and preventive medicine at Stony Brook University in ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Diagnosis and Investigation, Lewy Body Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia

Even a Little Exercise May Help Stave Off Dementia

Posted 26 Aug 2016 by

FRIDAY, Aug. 26, 2016 – Couch potatoes have a higher risk of developing dementia in old age, a new study reports. Seniors who get little to no exercise have a 50 percent greater risk of dementia compared with those who regularly take part in moderate or heavy amounts of physical activity, the researchers found. Moderate physical activity can include walking briskly, bicycling slower than 10 miles an hour, ballroom dancing or gardening, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "It doesn't require intensive physical activity to decrease risk of dementia," said senior researcher Dr. Zaldy Tan. He is medical director of the Alzheimer's and Dementia Care Program at University of California, Los Angeles. "Even moderate amounts are fine." Study participants aged 75 or older gained the most protective benefit from exercise against the onset of dementia, the findings ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features, Drug-Induced Dementia

Calcium Supplements Might Raise Older Women's Dementia Risk

Posted 18 Aug 2016 by

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 17, 2016 – Taking calcium supplements with the hope of keeping osteoporosis at bay may raise an older woman's risk of dementia, a new study suggests. And that seems particularly true if a woman has already sustained an event causing poor blood flow to the brain (cerebrovascular disease), such as from a stroke, researchers said. The study can't prove cause-and-effect. However, dementia risk was seven times higher in female stroke survivors who took calcium supplements, compared to women with a history of stroke who didn't use the supplements, the findings showed. The risk of dementia also was three times higher in women with white matter brain lesions who took calcium supplements, compared to women with white matter lesions who didn't take the supplements. Lesions in white matter tissue are evidence of a mini-stroke or some other problem impeding blood flow within the ... Read more

Related support groups: Osteoporosis, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Fracture, bone, Prevention of Osteoporosis, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Caltrate 600 with D, Calcium/Vitamin D, Oysco 500 with D, Citracal + D, Calcet, Calcium 600 D, Calcarb with D, Citracal Petites, Oyster Shell Calcium, Citracal Creamy Bites, Osteocit D Plus, Dical Captabs, Zingiber, Oysco D

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