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Related terms: Acute Granulocytic Leukemia, Acute Myelogenous Leukemia, ANLL, Cancer, Acute Granulocytic Leukemia, Cancer, Acute Myelogenous Leukemia, Cancer, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Leukemia, Acute Granulocytic, Leukemia, Acute Myelogenous, Leukemia, Acute Myeloid, AML

Therapeutic Vaccine Shows 'Game-Changing' Promise Against a Leukemia

Posted 16 hours ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 7, 2016 – An anti-cancer vaccine made from a leukemia patient's own cells can dramatically increase the chance of long-term survival against the deadly disease, a new study indicates. Patients with acute myeloid leukemia – one of the most aggressive blood cancers – must undergo intense chemotherapy to beat back the disease. And then they almost always relapse within a couple of years, explained senior researcher Dr. David Avigan. He is chief of hematological malignancies and director of the Cancer Vaccine Program at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. But a handful of leukemia patients have been in remission for nearly five years now, thanks to a new vaccine created from a fusion of leukemia cells and immune cells drawn from their own bodies. The vaccine has produced long-term remission for 70 percent of a small group of 17 vaccinated patients with an ... Read more

Related support groups: Leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Diagnosis and Investigation, Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia, Bone Marrow Depression/Low Blood Counts

Experimental Immune Cell Rx Shows Promise for Leukemia

Posted 21 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21, 2016 – An experimental therapy that revs up the immune system's cancer-fighting ability may help treat some leukemia patients who face a grim prognosis, a small study suggests. The treatment involves infusions of "natural killer" (NK) cells taken from a healthy donor and chemically "trained" to go after tumor cells. Researchers found that of nine patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who received the therapy, four went into complete remission for as long as six months. The findings are preliminary, and the therapy remains experimental, the researchers pointed out. But experts said the results are encouraging considering the outlook these AML patients faced before the trial. Their cancer had either failed to respond to standard chemotherapy or had come back, and they had run out of options. "When you see this kind of response in these patients, it's ... Read more

Related support groups: Leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Diagnosis and Investigation

Exercise May Cut Risk of 13 Cancers, Study Suggests

Posted 16 May 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 16, 2016 – Exercise may significantly reduce your risk for many types of cancer, including some of the most lethal forms of the disease, a large review suggests. Working out for even a couple of hours a week appears to shrink the risk of breast, colon and lung cancer, said researchers who looked at 1.4 million adults. "Those are three of the four major cancers that affect Americans today," said Marilie Gammon. She is a professor of epidemiology with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Gillings School of Public Health. And fitness buffs, take heart – your cancer risk appears to continue to decline as you rack up hours of physical activity, with no apparent upper plateau, said study lead author Steven Moore, an investigator with the U.S. National Cancer Institute. "The more activity, the more the benefit," Moore said. "As people did more, their risk continued to ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Leukemia, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Multiple Myeloma, Endometrial Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer, Bladder Cancer, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Stomach Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Gastric Cancer, Osteolytic Bone Lesions of Multiple Myeloma, Urinary Tract Cancer, Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia

New Immune Therapy Achieves Complete Remission in Blood Cancer Patients

Posted 16 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

A new therapy that uses a person's immune system to attack tumors led to complete remission in terminally ill blood cancer patients, according to researchers. In a clinical trial, symptoms vanished in 94 percent of leukemia patients who received the treatment. The response rate was more than 80 percent in patients with other blood cancers, and half achieved total remission, CNBC reported. The results were presented Monday at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Detailed data will be published later this year. They therapy involves removing immune system T-cells from patients, loading them with anti-cancer molecules, and placing them back in the body. The altered T-cells then seek and destroy cancer, CNBC reported. The results are unprecedented, according to researcher Stanley Riddell. "In the laboratory and in clinical trials, we are seeing ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Cancer, Hairy Cell Leukemia, Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML), Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL), Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Diagnosis and Investigation, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia, Acute Nonlymphocytic Leukemia, Infection Prophylaxis, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia, Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia, Meningeal Leukemia

Simple Blood Test May Predict a Blood Cancer's Return

Posted 21 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 21, 2016 – British researchers say a simple blood test may be a cheap, easy and effective way to spot risk of recurrence of a common form of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). This type of AML is characterized by a mutation in the NPM1 gene. A third of AML patients have this form of the deadly blood and bone marrow cancer. Despite aggressive chemotherapy, a certain percentage of patients with this mutated gene will see their disease return. And many would benefit from a pre-emptive, lifesaving bone marrow transplant – sometimes called stem cell transplantation, the researchers noted. But a transplant ultimately destroys not only the marrow's cancerous cells but healthy tissue as well. So, doctors have long sought a reliable way of separating those in true need of a transplant from those who would likely fare well without one, the researchers said. The problem: Accurately ... Read more

Related support groups: Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Diagnosis and Investigation

Antibody May Lower Rejection Rates After Stem Cell Transplant in Leukemia Patients

Posted 7 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 6, 2016 – People with acute leukemia who were given antibody therapy before a stem cell transplant fared better than those who didn't receive the treatment, a small study found. Stem cell transplantation allows doctors to give higher doses of cancer-killing chemotherapy, according to the American Cancer Society. However, the odds of the body rejecting the transplanted stem cells are very high – a condition called graft-versus-host disease, the study authors explained. By treating patients first with animal-derived antibodies, called antihuman T-lymphocyte immune globulin (ATG), the researchers were able to lower the threat of rejection in patients. "Graft-versus-host disease is the most serious complication after stem cell transplantation," said lead researcher Dr. Francesca Bonifazi, from the Institute of Hematology at Bologna University in Italy. "Using [ATG] reduces ... Read more

Related support groups: Hairy Cell Leukemia, Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML), Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL), Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, Acute Nonlymphocytic Leukemia, Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia, Infection Prophylaxis, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia, Meningeal Leukemia, Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia

End-of-Life Talk Often Comes Too Late for Blood Cancer Patients

Posted 21 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Dec. 21, 2015 – Many doctors wait too long to have end-of-life discussions with blood cancer patients, a new study finds. Researchers analyzed surveys completed by 349 blood cancer specialists, and found that 56 percent said end-of-life discussions with patients happen too late. Nearly 43 percent said they had their first end-of-life discussions with patients at less-than-ideal times, the findings showed. About 23 percent of the doctors said they waited until death was imminent before discussing hospice care. And nearly 40 percent waited until death was imminent before they asked patients where they wanted to die. Several factors may contribute to the delay in end-of-life discussions with blood cancer patients, according to Dr. Oreofe Odejide, from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, and colleagues. While solid tumors are incurable after they reach an advanced stage, ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Hairy Cell Leukemia, Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML), Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL), Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia, Acute Nonlymphocytic Leukemia, Infection Prophylaxis, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia, Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia, Meningeal Leukemia

Young Cancer Survivors Often Develop New Malignancies

Posted 6 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 – Teen and young adult cancer survivors are at increased risk for other cancers later in life, a new study reveals. Researchers analyzed U.S. National Cancer Institute data on people who survived cancers before age 40. They had the most common types of cancers in that age group: leukemia, lymphoma, testicular, ovarian, thyroid, breast, soft tissue and bone cancers. "This is a patient demographic that has been largely overlooked," said senior study author Dr. Robert Goldsby, a professor of pediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco Benioff Children's Hospital. Over 30 years, nearly 14 percent of the survivors were diagnosed with another, different type of cancer. On average, the second cancer occurred within 15 years. Compared to people in the general population, patients successfully treated for cancer between ages 15 and 39 were nearly 60 percent ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Hairy Cell Leukemia, Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML), Basal Cell Carcinoma, Lymphoma, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL), Ovarian Cancer, Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Stomach Cancer, Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma, Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Soft Tissue Sarcoma, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, Burkitt Lymphoma

Scientists Pinpoint Most Major Genes Behind Deadly Blood Cancer

Posted 1 May 2013 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 1 – Nearly all the genetic mutations associated with the blood cancer acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have probably been identified, researchers report. The findings could lead to improved treatments for AML patients, as well as ways to more accurately predict the severity of disease in individual patients. AML is a fast-growing cancer that often is difficult to treat. "We now have a genetic playbook for this type of leukemia," study co-leader Dr. Timothy Ley, associate director for cancer genomics at the Genome Institute at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, said in a university news release. "We don't know all the rules yet, but we know all the major players," Ley said. "This information can help us begin to understand which patients need more aggressive treatment right up front, and which can be treated effectively with standard chemotherapy." The ... Read more

Related support groups: Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Cancer Chemotherapy Tied to Slight Rise in Risk for Leukemia

Posted 14 Feb 2013 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 14 – Chemotherapy can be a lifesaver for thousands of cancer patients, but a new study suggests that it might slightly raise the odds for a type of leukemia later in life. Over the past 30 years, the risk for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has increased for patients who underwent chemotherapy for certain forms of cancer, particularly non-Hodgkin lymphoma, the new study found. On the other hand, the researchers from the U.S. National Cancer Institute said other cancer survivors may have a reduced risk for AML due to a change in chemotherapy agents that occurred decades ago. One expert not connected to the study stressed that cancer patients need to put the findings into perspective. "It's important to realize that the risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia related to prior chemotherapy is small and increases with the number of chemotherapy treatments given over time," ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Provera, Depo-Provera, Methotrexate, Accutane, Lupron, Tamoxifen, Medroxyprogesterone, Arimidex, Tretinoin, Fluorouracil, Femara, Lupron Depot, Gleevec, Isotretinoin, Rituxan, Claravis, Votrient, Anastrozole, Avastin

Detailed Gene Scan Might Help Guide Leukemia Treatment

Posted 14 Mar 2012 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 14 – By analyzing gene mutations in patients with acute myeloid leukemia, researchers were able to more accurately predict which ones had the best chances of going into remission, and which ones would respond well to standard treatments or needed more aggressive treatment. Doctors from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City analyzed 18 genes from about 500 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). AML is a cancer of the bone marrow, or the soft tissue that forms blood cells. The patients had previously taken part in a clinical trial for a chemotherapy drug, daunorubicin, and researchers knew how everyone had fared in that study. In the new analysis, the scientists used the latest gene-sequencing technology to determine what mutations were present in the cancer cells of the patients, and whether the presence of those mutations predicted how well ... Read more

Related support groups: Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Daunorubicin, Cerubidine

DNA Damage From Chemo May Help Spur Leukemia's Return

Posted 12 Jan 2012 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 12 – The chemotherapy used to treat a form of adult leukemia sets a trap that can result in the return of the disease within years, a new study suggests. The finding confirms the suspicions of specialists who thought chemotherapy drugs could disrupt DNA through mutations and ultimately allow tumor cells to avoid the effects of the medications. "Chemotherapy drugs are absolutely necessary to get leukemia patients into remission, but we also pay a price in terms of DNA damage," study co-author Dr. Timothy Ley, a professor of oncology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, said in a university news release. These drugs "may contribute to disease progression and relapse in many different cancers, which is why our long-term goal is to find targeted therapies based on the mutations specific to a patient's cancer, rather than use drugs that further damage ... Read more

Related support groups: Leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Death Rate Higher in Minorities With Acute Leukemia

Posted 22 Sep 2011 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 22 – A new study finds that blacks and Hispanics are less likely to develop acute leukemia than whites. But if they do become ill, they're much more likely to die. "We don't know the reason for the disparity, but now that we know it exists we can investigate why it occurs," said study lead researcher Dr. Manali I. Patel, postdoctoral fellow in hematology/oncology at the Stanford Cancer Institute in Stanford, Calif., in a statement provided by the American Association for Cancer Research. "Like all disparities in cancer, there could be any combination of influences; however, we believe that socioeconomic factors and access to care may be playing an important role." After studying medical records of nearly 41,000 patients with acute leukemia between 1998 and 2008, the researchers found that blacks had a 17 percent higher risk of dying of acute leukemia than whites, and ... Read more

Related support groups: Leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, Acute Nonlymphocytic Leukemia, Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia, Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia

Less Is More With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Drug

Posted 16 Mar 2011 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 16 – A lower dose of the drug cytarabine work as well as the high doses that are typically used to treat acute myeloid leukemia, and with fewer side effects, a new Dutch study finds. Cytarabine is used in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), along with other chemotherapy drugs and stem cell transplantation. Cytarabine resembles a normal cell nutrient needed by cancer cells to grow. However, when these cells take up cytarabine, the drug actually interferes with their growth. "The high-dose cytarabine schedules represent an unnecessary overdose causing excess toxicity with no apparent clinical benefit," said lead researcher Dr. Bob Lowenberg, a professor of hematology at Erasmus University Medical Center in Rotterdam. "The lower dose level is sufficient." The report is published in the March 17 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. For the study, ... Read more

Related support groups: Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Cytarabine, Cytosar, Cytosar-U, Tarabine PFS

Gene Activity May Affect Acute Myeloid Leukemia Outcome

Posted 21 Dec 2010 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 21 – For acute myeloid leukemia patients, overactive genes in their leukemic stem cells (LSC) can translate into a more difficult struggle to overcome their disease and achieve prolonged remission, new research reveals. "In many cancers, specific subpopulations of cells appear to be uniquely capable of initiating and maintaining tumors," the study authors explained in their report. The researchers identified 52 LSC genes that, when highly active, appear to prompt worse outcomes among acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. The finding is reported in the Dec. 22/29 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Between 2005 and 2007, study author Andrew J. Gentles, of Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif., and colleagues examined gene activity in a group of AML patients as well as healthy individuals. Separate data concerning AML tumors in four groups of ... Read more

Related support groups: Acute Myeloid Leukemia

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