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Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia News

FDA Panel OKs What May Soon Be First Gene Therapy Approved in U.S.

Posted 11 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 12, 2017 – A U.S. Food and Drug Administration advisory panel on Wednesday gave unanimous approval to what could soon be the first gene therapy to be marketed in the United States. The treatment, called CTL019, genetically tweaks a patient's own immune system cells into what scientists call "a living drug" to battle a form of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), The New York Times reported. The FDA's probable acceptance of such a strong recommendation may open a new era of gene-based medicines, which have for so long held only promise against a range of diseases. "When fully commercialized, this [CTL019] therapy will no doubt save the lives of many children and young adults who have had no other effective therapy for relapsed and refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia [ALL]," said Dr. John Maris, a pediatric oncologist at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Diagnosis and Investigation

FDA Grants Full Approval for Blincyto (blinatumomab) to Treat Relapsed or Refractory B-cell Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Adults and Children

Posted 12 days ago by Drugs.com

THOUSAND OAKS, Calif., July 11, 2017 /PRNewswire/ – Amgen (NASDAQ:AMGN) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the supplemental Biologics License Application (sBLA) for Blincyto (blinatumomab) to include overall survival (OS) data from the Phase 3 TOWER study. The approval converts Blincyto's accelerated approval to a full approval. The sBLA approval also included data from the Phase 2 ALCANTARA study supporting the treatment of patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) relapsed or refractory B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The approval expands the indication of Blincyto for the treatment of relapsed or refractory B-cell precursor ALL in adults and children. "For researchers and physicians, overall survival is the primary goal of treatment and the gold standard of outcomes, demonstrating a clear value to patients," ... Read more

Related support groups: Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Blinatumomab, Blincyto

Childhood Cancer Survivors Now Living Healthier Lives

Posted 2 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 2, 2017 – For people who battled cancer in childhood, the prospects for a long life without cancer recurrence or chronic illness are better than ever, a new study finds. That's largely due to changes in cancer treatment protocols that have meant less toxicity to children and less chance for long-term side effects, researchers said. This is the first "comprehensive" study on the issue, said study author Dr. Todd Gibson, who's with the cancer control department at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn. As the researchers explained, more children are surviving cancer, but the chemotherapy and radiation they receive as treatment can raise their risk for adult illness years later. So, cancer specialists have worked hard over time to modify treatments to maximize benefits but minimize long-term risks. And it seems to have paid off. In the new study, Gibson's ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Leukemia, Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Wilms' Tumor, History - Radiation Therapy

FDA Approves Xatmep (methotrexate) Oral Solution

Posted 27 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

Denver, April 26, 2017 — Silvergate Pharmaceuticals, Inc. leaders in the development and commercialization of innovative and safe medicines for children, today announced that the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Xatmep (methotrexate) Oral Solution, the first and only FDA-approved methotrexate oral solution. Xatmep is indicated for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (pJIA) in pediatric patients. “Xatmep is an exciting product in that it provides an FDA-approved, ready-to-use oral solution of methotrexate for children without the need for needles, crushing of tablets or compounding into a liquid formulation,” said Frank Segrave, President & CEO, Silvergate Pharmaceuticals, Inc. “As a company, we continue to focus on pediatric medications that are safe, effective, and readily available.” Xatmep (meth ... Read more

Related support groups: Methotrexate, Leukemia, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Xatmep

Gleevec Keeps a Leukemia in Check for More Than a Decade: Study

Posted 9 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 8, 2017 – The cancer drug Gleevec appears to keep chronic myeloid leukemia at bay a decade into treatment – with no signs of additional safety risks, a new study finds. Gleevec – known generically as imatinib – was hailed as a "wonder drug" when it was introduced in 2001 for treating chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). CML is a type of blood cancer that strikes about 5,000 Americans each year, according to the U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI). Before Gleevec, a CML diagnosis "amounted to a death sentence," the institute said. Now, most cases can be controlled, with either Gleevec or related drugs that have been developed since then. The new findings offer more evidence that the early "hype" around Gleevec was correct, said lead researcher Dr. Andreas Hochhaus, of Jena University Hospital in Germany. Of more than 500 CML patients given Gleevec as their initial ... Read more

Related support groups: Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML), Gleevec, Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Melanoma, Tasigna, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL), Sprycel, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Dasatinib, Nilotinib, Imatinib, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia

Gene Therapy Helps 2 Babies Fight Type of Leukemia

Posted 25 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25, 2017 – Two infants with an advanced form of leukemia are in remission after treatment with genetically tweaked immune system cells, British researchers report. Both babies had run out of treatment options for their cancer, known as B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, or ALL. But, after treatment with genetically altered T-cells – a type of immune system cell – both went into remission. The babies are now "at home and doing well," said Dr. Waseem Qasim, one of the doctors reporting on the cases. They will still have to be monitored for "some time," said Qasim, a professor of cell and gene therapy at University College London. Small trials are under way, he said, to see if the therapy can be more widely applied. ALL is a cancer of the white blood cells that strikes roughly 6,000 U.S. adults and children each year, according to the American Cancer Society. The ... Read more

Related support groups: Leukemia, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL), Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, Acute Nonlymphocytic Leukemia, Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia, Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia

Experimental Immune Cell Rx Shows Promise for Leukemia

Posted 21 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21, 2016 – An experimental therapy that revs up the immune system's cancer-fighting ability may help treat some leukemia patients who face a grim prognosis, a small study suggests. The treatment involves infusions of "natural killer" (NK) cells taken from a healthy donor and chemically "trained" to go after tumor cells. Researchers found that of nine patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who received the therapy, four went into complete remission for as long as six months. The findings are preliminary, and the therapy remains experimental, the researchers pointed out. But experts said the results are encouraging considering the outlook these AML patients faced before the trial. Their cancer had either failed to respond to standard chemotherapy or had come back, and they had run out of options. "When you see this kind of response in these patients, it's ... Read more

Related support groups: Leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Diagnosis and Investigation

FDA Approves Blincyto (blinatumomab) For Use In Pediatric Patients With Philadelphia Chromosome-Negative Relapsed Or Refractory B-cell Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Posted 5 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

THOUSAND OAKS, Calif., Sept. 1, 2016 /PRNewswire/ – Amgen (NASDAQ:AMGN) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the supplemental Biologics License Application (sBLA) for Blincyto (blinatumomab) to include new data supporting the treatment of pediatric patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative (Ph-) relapsed or refractory B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). This indication is approved under accelerated approval, and continued approval may be contingent upon verification of clinical benefit in subsequent trials. The approval is based on results from the Phase 1/2 '205, an open-label, multicenter, single-arm trial, which evaluated the efficacy and safety of Blincyto in pediatric patients with relapsed or refractory B-cell precursor ALL. About Study '205 Study '205 evaluated the safety and efficacy of BLINCYTO in a Phase 1/2 ... Read more

Related support groups: Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Blincyto, Blinatumomab

Exercise May Cut Risk of 13 Cancers, Study Suggests

Posted 16 May 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 16, 2016 – Exercise may significantly reduce your risk for many types of cancer, including some of the most lethal forms of the disease, a large review suggests. Working out for even a couple of hours a week appears to shrink the risk of breast, colon and lung cancer, said researchers who looked at 1.4 million adults. "Those are three of the four major cancers that affect Americans today," said Marilie Gammon. She is a professor of epidemiology with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Gillings School of Public Health. And fitness buffs, take heart – your cancer risk appears to continue to decline as you rack up hours of physical activity, with no apparent upper plateau, said study lead author Steven Moore, an investigator with the U.S. National Cancer Institute. "The more activity, the more the benefit," Moore said. "As people did more, their risk continued to ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Leukemia, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Multiple Myeloma, Endometrial Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Bladder Cancer, Stomach Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Head and Neck Cancer, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Gastric Cancer, Osteolytic Bone Lesions of Multiple Myeloma, Urinary Tract Cancer, Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia

Certain Cancers Seem Less Likely for Kids of Hispanic Moms Born Outside U.S.

Posted 25 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 25, 2016 – Children of Hispanic mothers who weren't born in the United States may be at lower risk for some types of childhood cancers, a new study suggests. "Incorporating the immigrant experience into studies of childhood cancer may help to inform research on disease [causes], identify vulnerable populations and highlight opportunities for cancer prevention," said Julia Heck, of the University of California, Los Angeles, and her study co-authors. It is important to evaluate childhood cancer risk in the large and growing Hispanic population, the research team said. For the study, the investigators analyzed data from children born in California between 1983 and 2012. The analysis was limited to children of U.S.-born white, U.S.-born Hispanic, or non-U.S.-born Hispanic mothers. Among the children, there were about 13,600 cancer diagnoses before age 6, and more than 15.5 ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Malignant Glioma, Wilms' Tumor, Neuroblastoma, Anaplastic Astrocytoma

New Immune Therapy Achieves Complete Remission in Blood Cancer Patients

Posted 16 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

A new therapy that uses a person's immune system to attack tumors led to complete remission in terminally ill blood cancer patients, according to researchers. In a clinical trial, symptoms vanished in 94 percent of leukemia patients who received the treatment. The response rate was more than 80 percent in patients with other blood cancers, and half achieved total remission, CNBC reported. The results were presented Monday at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Detailed data will be published later this year. They therapy involves removing immune system T-cells from patients, loading them with anti-cancer molecules, and placing them back in the body. The altered T-cells then seek and destroy cancer, CNBC reported. The results are unprecedented, according to researcher Stanley Riddell. "In the laboratory and in clinical trials, we are seeing ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Cancer, Hairy Cell Leukemia, Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML), Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL), Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Diagnosis and Investigation, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia, Acute Nonlymphocytic Leukemia, Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia, Infection Prophylaxis, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Meningeal Leukemia, Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia

Fewer Childhood Cancer Survivors Dying From 'Late' Effects

Posted 13 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13, 2016 – Fewer childhood cancer survivors are dying years later from lingering effects of the treatment that conquered their cancer, a new study finds. Experts called the report, published in the Jan. 14 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, "very good news." "The findings substantiate what experts in the field have hoped would be true," said lead researcher Dr. Gregory Armstrong, of St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, in Memphis, Tenn. Survival rates from many childhood cancers are high, but survivors still face what doctors call "late effects" – health problems that develop months to years after the cancer treatment has ended. Among U.S. children who survived cancer back in the 1970s and '80s, 18 percent died within the next 25 years, Armstrong said. Sometimes, the initial cancer comes back. Often though, the health issues are related to the very ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Methotrexate, Fluorouracil, Xeloda, Hydroxyurea, Mercaptopurine, Hydrea, Carboplatin, Cisplatin, Cytoxan, Dacogen, Cyclophosphamide, Capecitabine, Oxaliplatin, Temodar, Bendamustine, Treanda, Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Gemzar

Antibody May Lower Rejection Rates After Stem Cell Transplant in Leukemia Patients

Posted 7 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 6, 2016 – People with acute leukemia who were given antibody therapy before a stem cell transplant fared better than those who didn't receive the treatment, a small study found. Stem cell transplantation allows doctors to give higher doses of cancer-killing chemotherapy, according to the American Cancer Society. However, the odds of the body rejecting the transplanted stem cells are very high – a condition called graft-versus-host disease, the study authors explained. By treating patients first with animal-derived antibodies, called antihuman T-lymphocyte immune globulin (ATG), the researchers were able to lower the threat of rejection in patients. "Graft-versus-host disease is the most serious complication after stem cell transplantation," said lead researcher Dr. Francesca Bonifazi, from the Institute of Hematology at Bologna University in Italy. "Using [ATG] reduces ... Read more

Related support groups: Hairy Cell Leukemia, Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML), Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL), Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia, Acute Nonlymphocytic Leukemia, Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia, Infection Prophylaxis, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia, Meningeal Leukemia

End-of-Life Talk Often Comes Too Late for Blood Cancer Patients

Posted 21 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Dec. 21, 2015 – Many doctors wait too long to have end-of-life discussions with blood cancer patients, a new study finds. Researchers analyzed surveys completed by 349 blood cancer specialists, and found that 56 percent said end-of-life discussions with patients happen too late. Nearly 43 percent said they had their first end-of-life discussions with patients at less-than-ideal times, the findings showed. About 23 percent of the doctors said they waited until death was imminent before discussing hospice care. And nearly 40 percent waited until death was imminent before they asked patients where they wanted to die. Several factors may contribute to the delay in end-of-life discussions with blood cancer patients, according to Dr. Oreofe Odejide, from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, and colleagues. While solid tumors are incurable after they reach an advanced stage, ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Hairy Cell Leukemia, Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML), Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL), Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, Acute Nonlymphocytic Leukemia, Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia, Infection Prophylaxis, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia, Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia, Meningeal Leukemia

Young Cancer Survivors Often Develop New Malignancies

Posted 6 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 – Teen and young adult cancer survivors are at increased risk for other cancers later in life, a new study reveals. Researchers analyzed U.S. National Cancer Institute data on people who survived cancers before age 40. They had the most common types of cancers in that age group: leukemia, lymphoma, testicular, ovarian, thyroid, breast, soft tissue and bone cancers. "This is a patient demographic that has been largely overlooked," said senior study author Dr. Robert Goldsby, a professor of pediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco Benioff Children's Hospital. Over 30 years, nearly 14 percent of the survivors were diagnosed with another, different type of cancer. On average, the second cancer occurred within 15 years. Compared to people in the general population, patients successfully treated for cancer between ages 15 and 39 were nearly 60 percent ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Hairy Cell Leukemia, Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML), Basal Cell Carcinoma, Lymphoma, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL), Ovarian Cancer, Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Stomach Cancer, Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma, Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Soft Tissue Sarcoma, Testicular Cancer, Burkitt Lymphoma

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methotrexate, Gleevec, Sprycel, mercaptopurine, doxorubicin, dasatinib, Adriamycin, imatinib, Oncaspar, view more... Purinethol, Trexall, Iclusig, Methotrexate LPF Sodium, nelarabine, Adriamycin PFS, Adriamycin RDF, Erwinaze, Marqibo, Xatmep, Blincyto, Purixan, Folex PFS, Arranon, asparaginase erwinia chrysanthemi, blinatumomab, ponatinib, teniposide, clofarabine, Clolar, Vumon, pegaspargase, vincristine liposomal