Adderall (amphetamine / dextroamphetamine) and Alcohol / Food Interactions

There are 3 alcohol/food/lifestyle interactions with Adderall (amphetamine / dextroamphetamine) which include:

amphetamine ↔ Alcohol (Ethanol)

Moderate Drug Interaction

Using ethanol together with amphetamine can increase the risk of cardiovascular side effects such as increased heart rate, chest pain, or blood pressure changes. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with amphetamine. Let your doctor know if you experience severe or frequent headaches, chest pain, and/or a fast or pounding heartbeat. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

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dextroamphetamine ↔ Alcohol (Ethanol)

Moderate Drug Interaction

Using ethanol together with dextroamphetamine can increase the risk of cardiovascular side effects such as increased heart rate, chest pain, or blood pressure changes. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with dextroamphetamine. Let your doctor know if you experience severe or frequent headaches, chest pain, and/or a fast or pounding heartbeat. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

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amphetamine ↔ food

Moderate Food Interaction

Consumer information for this interaction is not currently available.

GENERALLY AVOID: Alcohol may potentiate the cardiovascular effects of amphetamines. The exact mechanism of interaction is unknown. In one study, concurrent administration of methamphetamine (30 mg intravenously) and ethanol (1 gm/kg orally over 30 minutes) increased heart rate by 24 beats/minute compared to methamphetamine alone. This increases cardiac work and myocardial oxygen consumption, which may lead to more adverse cardiovascular effects than either agent alone. Subjective effects of ethanol were diminished in the eight study subjects, but those of methamphetamine were not affected. The pharmacokinetics of methamphetamine were also unaffected except for a decrease in the apparent volume of distribution at steady state. The interaction was suspected in a case report of a 20-year-old male who experienced retrosternal chest pain shortly after drinking alcohol and taking a double dose of his amphetamine/dextroamphetamine medication (Adderall 15 mg X 2) to stay alert. The patient had no family history of cardiovascular diseases, and his past medical history was remarkable only for ADHD. Prior to the episode, the patient had not taken his medication for weeks and had been drinking whiskey the previous three nights before going to bed. The patient was diagnosed with myocardial infarction likely secondary to amphetamine-induced coronary vasospasm.

MANAGEMENT: Concomitant use of amphetamines and alcohol should be avoided if possible, especially in patients with a history of heart disease.

References

  1. Mendelson J, Jones RT, Upton R, Jacob P 3rd "Methamphetamine and ethanol interactions in humans." Clin Pharmacol Ther 57 (1995): 559-68
  2. Jiao X, Velez S, Ringstad J, Eyma V, Miller D, Bleiberg M "Myocardial infarction associated with Adderall XR and alcohol use in a young man." J Am Board Fam Med 22 (2009): 197-201

dextroamphetamine ↔ food

Moderate Food Interaction

Consumer information for this interaction is not currently available.

GENERALLY AVOID: Alcohol may potentiate the cardiovascular effects of amphetamines. The exact mechanism of interaction is unknown. In one study, concurrent administration of methamphetamine (30 mg intravenously) and ethanol (1 gm/kg orally over 30 minutes) increased heart rate by 24 beats/minute compared to methamphetamine alone. This increases cardiac work and myocardial oxygen consumption, which may lead to more adverse cardiovascular effects than either agent alone. Subjective effects of ethanol were diminished in the eight study subjects, but those of methamphetamine were not affected. The pharmacokinetics of methamphetamine were also unaffected except for a decrease in the apparent volume of distribution at steady state. The interaction was suspected in a case report of a 20-year-old male who experienced retrosternal chest pain shortly after drinking alcohol and taking a double dose of his amphetamine/dextroamphetamine medication (Adderall 15 mg X 2) to stay alert. The patient had no family history of cardiovascular diseases, and his past medical history was remarkable only for ADHD. Prior to the episode, the patient had not taken his medication for weeks and had been drinking whiskey the previous three nights before going to bed. The patient was diagnosed with myocardial infarction likely secondary to amphetamine-induced coronary vasospasm.

MANAGEMENT: Concomitant use of amphetamines and alcohol should be avoided if possible, especially in patients with a history of heart disease.

References

  1. Mendelson J, Jones RT, Upton R, Jacob P 3rd "Methamphetamine and ethanol interactions in humans." Clin Pharmacol Ther 57 (1995): 559-68
  2. Jiao X, Velez S, Ringstad J, Eyma V, Miller D, Bleiberg M "Myocardial infarction associated with Adderall XR and alcohol use in a young man." J Am Board Fam Med 22 (2009): 197-201

You should also know about...

Adderall (amphetamine / dextroamphetamine) drug Interactions

There are 499 drug interactions with Adderall (amphetamine / dextroamphetamine)

Adderall (amphetamine / dextroamphetamine) disease Interactions

There are 6 disease interactions with Adderall (amphetamine / dextroamphetamine) which include:

Drug Interaction Classification

The classifications below are a general guideline only. It is difficult to determine the relevance of a particular drug interaction to any individual given the large number of variables.

Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.

Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider.

Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Multum is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. In addition, the drug information contained herein may be time sensitive and should not be utilized as a reference resource beyond the date hereof. This material does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients, or recommend therapy. Multum's information is a reference resource designed as supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge, and judgement of healthcare practitioners in patient care. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for any given patient. Multum Information Services, Inc. does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. Copyright 2000-2014 Multum Information Services, Inc. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist.

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