Estradiol Dosage

The information at Drugs.com is not a substitute for medical advice. ALWAYS consult your doctor or pharmacist.

Usual Adult Dose for Postmenopausal Symptoms

Oral:
0.45 mg to 2 mg orally once a day.

Parenteral:
1 to 5 mg of estradiol cypionate IM every 3 to 4 weeks or 10 to 20 mg of estradiol valerate IM every 4 weeks.

Vaginal Ring:
0.05 mg/day or 0.1 mg/day vaginal ring. The ring should remain in place for 3 months and then be replaced by a new ring if therapy is to continue.

Topical:
0.025 to 0.1 mg/day (transdermal film) applied topically 1 or 2 times a week. Application sites vary according to manufacturer formulation and include the lower abdomen, upper thigh, buttocks, or upper arm. Systems should not be applied to the breasts.
0.05 mg/day (2 foil pouches of transdermal emulsion) applied topically to both legs each morning.
0.25 mg unit dose packet (0.1% transdermal gel) applied topically once daily to the upper right or left thigh at the same time daily.
1.25 g (one spray) EstroGel (0.75 mg/1.25 gm - 0.06% transdermal gel) applied topically to the arms at the same time daily.
1.53 mg (one spray) Evamist (1.53 mg/spray transdermal spray) applied topically to the forearm at the same time daily.
0.87 g (one spray) Elestrin (0.52 mg/1.087 g - 0.06% transdermal gel) applied topically to the upper arm at the same time daily.

Women currently on oral estrogen therapy and changing to a transdermal estradiol system should initiate transdermal therapy 1 week following discontinuation of oral estrogens (sooner if menopausal symptoms reappear). Changes between transdermal systems may be initiated without interruption of therapy.

In general, the duration of hormone therapy for the treatment of postmenopausal symptoms should be limited. Treatment for one to five years is generally sufficient. However, long-term therapy (for the treatment/prophylaxis of osteoporosis and for risk reduction of cardiovascular disease) may be considered during the time in which the patient is being treated for postmenopausal symptoms.

Because of the potential increased risks of cardiovascular events, breast cancer and venous thromboembolic events, use should be limited to the shortest duration consistent with treatment goals and risks for the individual woman, and should be periodically reevaluated. When used solely for the treatment of symptoms of vulvar and vaginal atrophy, topical vaginal products should be considered.

Usual Adult Dose for Atrophic Urethritis

Oral:
1 to 2 mg orally once a day.

Parenteral:
10 to 20 mg of estradiol valerate IM every 4 weeks.

Vaginal Ring:
0.05 mg/day or 0.1 mg/day vaginal ring. The ring should remain in place for 3 months and then be replaced by a new ring if therapy is to continue.

Topical:
0.025 to 0.1 mg/day (transdermal film) applied topically 1 or 2 times a week. Application sites vary according to manufacturer formulation and include the lower abdomen, upper thigh, buttocks, or upper arm. Systems should not be applied to the breasts.
1.25 g/day (estradiol gel) applied topically at the same time daily. If used solely for the treatment of vulvar and vaginal atrophy, topical vaginal products should be considered.

Women currently on oral estrogen therapy and changing to a transdermal estradiol system should initiate transdermal therapy 1 week following discontinuation of oral estrogens (sooner if menopausal symptoms reappear). Changes between transdermal systems may be initiated without interruption of therapy.

Because of the potential increased risks of cardiovascular events, breast cancer and venous thromboembolic events, use should be limited to the shortest duration consistent with treatment goals and risks for the individual woman, and should be periodically reevaluated. When used solely for the treatment of symptoms of vulvar and vaginal atrophy, topical vaginal products should be considered.
In general, the duration of hormone therapy for the treatment of postmenopausal symptoms like atrophic vaginitis, kraurosis vulvae, or atrophic urethritis should be limited. Treatment for one to five years is generally sufficient.

Usual Adult Dose for Atrophic Vaginitis

Oral:
1 to 2 mg orally once a day.

Parenteral:
10 to 20 mg of estradiol valerate IM every 4 weeks.

Vaginal Ring:
0.05 mg/day or 0.1 mg/day vaginal ring. The ring should remain in place for 3 months and then be replaced by a new ring if therapy is to continue.

Topical:
0.025 to 0.1 mg/day (transdermal film) applied topically 1 or 2 times a week. Application sites vary according to manufacturer formulation and include the lower abdomen, upper thigh, buttocks, or upper arm. Systems should not be applied to the breasts.
1.25 g/day (estradiol gel) applied topically at the same time daily. If used solely for the treatment of vulvar and vaginal atrophy, topical vaginal products should be considered.

Women currently on oral estrogen therapy and changing to a transdermal estradiol system should initiate transdermal therapy 1 week following discontinuation of oral estrogens (sooner if menopausal symptoms reappear). Changes between transdermal systems may be initiated without interruption of therapy.

Because of the potential increased risks of cardiovascular events, breast cancer and venous thromboembolic events, use should be limited to the shortest duration consistent with treatment goals and risks for the individual woman, and should be periodically reevaluated. When used solely for the treatment of symptoms of vulvar and vaginal atrophy, topical vaginal products should be considered.
In general, the duration of hormone therapy for the treatment of postmenopausal symptoms like atrophic vaginitis, kraurosis vulvae, or atrophic urethritis should be limited. Treatment for one to five years is generally sufficient.

Usual Adult Dose for Hypoestrogenism

Oral:
1 to 2 mg orally once a day.

Parenteral:
1.5 to 2 mg of estradiol cypionate IM once a month or 10 to 20 mg estradiol valerate IM every 4 weeks.

Topical:
0.025 to 0.1 mg/day (transdermal film) applied topically 1 or 2 times a week. Application sites vary according to manufacturer formulation and include the lower abdomen, upper thigh, buttocks, or upper arm. Systems should not be applied to the breasts.

Dosages should be titrated according to patient response. Therapy should be maintained with the minimum dosage that will achieve the desired clinical effect.

Usual Adult Dose for Oophorectomy

Oral:
1 to 2 mg orally once a day.

Parenteral:
10 to 20 mg of estradiol valerate by IM every 4 weeks.

Topical:
0.025 to 0.1 mg/day (transdermal film) applied topically 1 or 2 times a week. Application sites vary according to manufacturer formulation and include the lower abdomen, upper thigh, buttocks, or upper arm. Systems should not be applied to the breasts.

Women currently on oral estrogen therapy and changing to a transdermal estradiol system should initiate transdermal therapy 1 week following discontinuation of oral estrogens (sooner if menopausal symptoms reappear). Changes between transdermal systems may be initiated without interruption of therapy.

Usual Adult Dose for Primary Ovarian Failure

Oral:
1 to 2 mg orally once a day.

Parenteral:
10 to 20 mg of estradiol valerate by IM every 4 weeks.

Topical:
0.025 to 0.1 mg/day (transdermal film) applied topically 1 or 2 times a week. Application sites vary according to manufacturer formulation and include the lower abdomen, upper thigh, buttocks, or upper arm. Systems should not be applied to the breasts.

Women currently on oral estrogen therapy and changing to a transdermal estradiol system should initiate transdermal therapy 1 week following discontinuation of oral estrogens (sooner if menopausal symptoms reappear). Changes between transdermal systems may be initiated without interruption of therapy.

Usual Adult Dose for Breast Cancer-Palliative

10 mg orally 3 times a day for at least 3 months. Estrogen therapy for breast cancer should be considered only for palliation in the treatment of metastatic disease in select patients

Usual Adult Dose for Osteoporosis

Oral:
0.5 mg orally once a day.

Topical:
0.025 to 0.1 mg/day (transdermal film) applied topically 1 or 2 times a week. Systems should not be applied to the breasts.
14 mcg/day weekly (transdermal film) applied topically once a week.

Application sites vary according to manufacturer formulation and include the lower abdomen, upper thigh, buttocks, or upper arm.

In addition to hormonal therapy, adequate calcium intake is important for postmenopausal women who require treatment or prevention of osteoporosis. The average diet of older American women contains 400 to 600 mg of calcium per day. A suggested optimal intake is 1500 mg per day. If dietary intake is insufficient to achieve 1500 mg per day, supplementation may be useful in women who have no contraindication to calcium supplementation.

Long-term therapy (for more than 5 years) is generally necessary in order to obtain substantive benefits in reducing the risk of bone fracture. Maximal benefits are obtained if estrogen therapy is initiated as soon after menopause as possible. The optimal duration of therapy has not been definitively determined.

Women currently on oral estrogen therapy and changing to a transdermal estradiol system should initiate transdermal therapy 1 week following discontinuation of oral estrogens (sooner if menopausal symptoms reappear). Changes between transdermal systems may be initiated without interruption of therapy.

When used solely for the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis, approved non-estrogen treatments should carefully be considered, and estrogen and combined estrogen-progestin products should only be considered for women with significant risk of osteoporosis that outweighs the risks of the drug.

Usual Adult Dose for Prostate Cancer

Oral:
1 to 2 mg orally 3 times a day.

Parenteral:
Estradiol valerate 30 mg IM every 1 to 2 weeks.

An apparent response should be noted within 3 months of initiation of therapy. Estrogen therapy for prostate cancer should be considered only for palliation in the treatment of metastatic disease in select patients.

Renal Dose Adjustments

Data not available

Liver Dose Adjustments

Hepatic metabolism of estrogens may be impaired in patients with liver disease and caution is recommended in patients receiving estradiol therapy.

Precautions

The FDA has notified healthcare professionals and patients that it is reviewing reports of adverse effects from estradiol transdermal spray (Evamist). Children unintentionally exposed to the drug through skin contact with women may experience premature puberty. Female children may experience nipple swelling and breast development. Male children may experience breast enlargement.

Dialysis

Data not available

Hide
(web5)