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ziprasidone FDA Alerts

The FDA Alert(s) below may be specifically about ziprasidone or relate to a group or class of drugs which include ziprasidone.

MedWatch Safety Alerts are distributed by the FDA and published by Drugs.com. Following is a list of possible medication recalls, market withdrawals, alerts and warnings. For the latest FDA MedWatch alerts, go here.

Recent FDA Alert(s) for ziprasidone

Ziprasidone (Marketed as Geodon and Generics): Drug Safety Communication - Rare But Potentially Fatal Skin Reactions

Dec 11, 2014

Audience: Psychiatry, Dermatology, Pharmacy, Family Practice

ISSUE:  FDA is warning that the antipsychotic drug ziprasidone (marketed under the brand name, Geodon, and its generics) is associated with a rare but serious skin reaction that can progress to affect other parts of the body. A new warning has been added to the Geodon drug label to describe the serious condition known as Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS). See the FDA Drug Safety Communication for a Data Summary and additional information.

DRESS may start as a rash that can spread to all parts of the body. It can include fever, swollen lymph nodes, and inflammation of organs such as the liver, kidney, lungs, heart, or pancreas. DRESS also causes a higher-than-normal number of a particular type of white blood cell called eosinophils in the blood. DRESS can lead to death.

BACKGROUND: Ziprasidone is an atypical antipsychotic drug used to treat schizophrenia and bipolar I disorder.

FDA reviewed information from six patients in whom the signs and symptoms of DRESS appeared between 11 and 30 days after ziprasidone treatment was started. None of these patients died (see Data Summary in the Drug Safety Communication). Based on this information, FDA required the manufacturer of Geodon to add a new warning for DRESS to the Warnings and Precautions section of the drug labels for the capsule, oral suspension, and injection formulations.

RECOMMENDATION: Patients who have a fever with a rash and/or swollen lymph glands should seek urgent medical care. Health care professionals should immediately stop treatment with ziprasidone if DRESS is suspected.

Healthcare professionals and patients are encouraged to report adverse events or side effects related to the use of these products to the FDA's MedWatch Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program:


[12/11/2014 - Drug Safety Communication - FDA]

Antipsychotic drugs: Class Labeling Change - Treatment During Pregnancy and Potential Risk to Newborns

Feb 22, 2011

Audience: Psychiatry, OBGYN

Drugs include: Haldol, FazaClo, Fanapt, Clozaril, Risperdal, Zyprexa, Seroquel, Abilify, Geodon, Invega, Loxitane, Moban, Navane, Orap, Saphris, Stelazine, Thorazine, Symbyax

ISSUE: FDA notified healthcare professionals that the Pregnancy section of drug labels for the entire class of antipsychotic drugs has been updated. The new drug labels now contain more and consistent information about the potential risk for abnormal muscle movements (extrapyramidal signs or EPS) and withdrawal symptoms in newborns whose mothers were treated with these drugs during the third trimester of pregnancy.

The symptoms of EPS and withdrawal in newborns may include agitation, abnormally increased or decreased muscle tone, tremor, sleepiness, severe difficulty breathing, and difficulty in feeding. In some newborns, the symptoms subside within hours or days and do not require specific treatment; other newborns may require longer hospital stays.

BACKGROUND: Antipsychotic drugs are used to treat symptoms of psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

RECOMMENDATION: Healthcare professionals should be aware of the effects of antipsychotic medications on newborns when the medications are used during pregnancy. Patients should not stop taking these medications if they become pregnant without talking to their healthcare professional, as abruptly stopping antipsychotic medications can cause significant complications for treatment.

Healthcare professionals and patients are encouraged to report adverse events or side effects related to the use of these products to the FDA's MedWatch Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program:

[02/22/2011 - Drug Safety Communication - FDA]

Antipsychotics, Conventional and Atypical

Jun 16, 2008

Audience: Neuropsychiatric and geriatrics healthcare professionals

[Posted 06/16/2008] FDA notified healthcare professionals that both conventional and atypical antipsychotics are associated with an increased risk of mortality in elderly patients treated for dementia-related psychosis. In April 2005, FDA notified healthcare professionals that patients with dementia-related psychosis treated with atypical antipsychotic drugs are at an increased risk of death. Since issuing that notification, FDA has reviewed additional information that indicates the risk is also associated with conventional antipsychotics. Antipsychotics are not indicated for the treatment of dementia-related psychosis. The prescribing information for all antipsychotic drugs will now include the same information about this risk in a BOXED WARNING and the WARNINGS section.

[June 16, 2008 - Information for Healthcare Professionals - FDA]

Atypical Antipsychotic Drugs

Apr 11, 2005

Audience: Neuropsychiatric healthcare professionals, patients and caregivers

The Food and Drug Administration has issued a public health advisory to alert health care providers, patients, and patient caregivers to new safety information concerning an unapproved, “off-label” use of certain antipsychotic drugs approved for the treatment of schizophrenia and mania. FDA has determined that the treatment of behavioral disorders in elderly patients with dementia with atypical (second generation) antipsychotic medications is associated with increased mortality. Clinical studies of these drugs in this population have shown a higher death rate associated with their use compared to patients receiving a placebo.

[April 11, 2005 - Public Health Advisory - FDA]
[April 11, 2005 - Drug Information Page - FDA]

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