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Advair Diskus FDA Alerts

The FDA Alert(s) below may be specifically about Advair Diskus or relate to a group or class of drugs which include Advair Diskus (fluticasone/salmeterol).

MedWatch Safety Alerts are distributed by the FDA and published by Drugs.com. Following is a list of possible medication recalls, market withdrawals, alerts and warnings. For the latest FDA MedWatch alerts, go here.

Recent FDA Alert(s) for fluticasone/salmeterol

Long-Acting Beta agonists (LABAs) and Inhaled Corticosteroids (ICS): Drug Safety Communication - Boxed Warning About Asthma-Related Death Removed

Dec 20, 2017

Audience: Pharmacy, Pulmonology, Internal Medicine, Family Practice

ISSUE: FDA's most prominent warning, the Boxed Warning, about asthma-related death has been removed from the drug labels of medicines that contain both an ICS and LABA. A FDA review of four large clinical safety trials shows that treating asthma with long-acting beta agonists (LABAs) in combination with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) does not result in significantly more serious asthma-related side effects than treatment with ICS alone. A description of the four trials is now also included in the Warnings and Precautions section of the drug labels. These trials showed that LABAs, when used with ICS, did not significantly increase the risk of asthma-related hospitalizations, the need to insert a breathing tube known as intubation, or asthma-related deaths, compared to ICS alone.  

BACKGROUND: In 2011, FDA required the drug companies manufacturing fixed-dose combination drugs containing an ICS and LABA (GlaxoSmithKline, Merck, Astra Zeneca) to conduct several large, 26-week, randomized, double-blind, active-controlled clinical safety trials to evaluate the risk of serious asthma-related events when long-acting beta agonists (LABAs) were used in fixed-dose combination with an inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) compared to ICS alone in patients with asthma. FDA reviewed the results of four trials involving 41,297 patients. The results demonstrate that the use of ICS/LABA in fixed-dose combination does not result in a significant increase in the risk of serious asthma-related events compared to ICS alone. The results of subgroup analyses for gender, adolescents 12-18 years, and African Americans are consistent with the primary endpoint results. 

The four trials also assessed efficacy of the ICS/LABA products. The primary efficacy endpoint was asthma exacerbation, defined as a deterioration of asthma requiring the use of systemic corticosteroids for at least 3 days, or an in-patient hospitalization or emergency department visit due to asthma that required systemic corticosteroids. The results showed that the ICS/LABA combination reduced asthma exacerbations compared to ICS alone, noting that the majority of these exacerbations were those that required at least 3 days of systemic corticosteroids. This efficacy information has been added to the Clinical Studies section of the ICS/LABA drug labels.

RECOMMENDATION: Health care professionals should refer to the most recently approved drug labels for recommendations on using ICS/LABA medicines (see links in Table 1 of the Drug Safety Communication). Patients and parents/caregivers should talk to your health care professional if you have any questions or concerns. Do not stop taking your asthma medicines without first talking to your health care professional. Also read the patient information leaflet that comes with every prescription.

Healthcare professionals and patients are encouraged to report adverse events or side effects related to the use of these products to the FDA's MedWatch Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program:

  • Complete and submit the report Online: www.fda.gov/MedWatch/report
  • Download form or call 1-800-332-1088 to request a reporting form, then complete and return to the address on the pre-addressed form, or submit by fax to 1-800-FDA-0178

[12/20/2017 - Drug Safety Communication - FDA]

Long-Acting Beta-Agonists (LABAs): New Safe Use Requirements

Apr 15, 2011

Audience: Asthma management healthcare professionals, patients

[UPDATED 04-15-2011] To further evaluate the safety of Long-Acting Beta-Agonists (LABAs) when used in combination with inhaled corticosteroids for the treatment of asthma, the FDA is requiring the manufacturers of LABAs to conduct five randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trials comparing the addition of LABAs to inhaled corticosteroids versus inhaled corticosteroids alone. The clinical trials will begin in 2011 and FDA expects to receive results in 2017.

[UPDATED 06/03/2010] Drug labels now contain updated recommendations.

[Posted 02/18/2010] FDA notified healthcare professionals and consumers that, due to safety concerns, FDA is requiring a risk management strategy (REMS) and class-labeling changes for all LABAs. The REMS will require a revised Medication Guide written specifically for patients, and a plan to educate healthcare professionals about the appropriate use of LABAs. These changes are based on FDA's analyses of studies showing an increased risk of severe exacerbation of asthma symptoms, leading to hospitalizations in pediatric and adult patients as well as death in some patients using LABAs for the treatment of asthma. 

Healthcare professionals are reminded that to ensure the safe use of these products:

  • Single-ingredient LABAs should only be used in combination with an asthma controller medication; they should not be used alone.
  • LABAs should only be used long-term in patients whose asthma cannot be adequately controlled on asthma controller medications.
  • LABAs should be used for the shortest duration of time required to achieve control of asthma symptoms and discontinued, if possible, once asthma control is achieved. Patients should then be maintained on an asthma controller medication.
  • Pediatric and adolescent patients who require the addition of a LABA to an inhaled corticosteroid should use a combination product containing both an inhaled corticosteroid and a LABA, to ensure compliance with both medications.

FDA has determined that the benefits of LABAs in improving asthma symptoms outweigh the potential risks when used appropriately with an asthma controller medication in patients who need the addition of LABAs. FDA believes the safety measures recommended will improve the safe use of these drugs.

[04/15/2011 - Drug Safety Communication - FDA]
[06/03/2010 - Drug Safety Communication - FDA]
[02/18/2010 - Drug Safety Communication - FDA]
[02/18/2010 - Questions and Answers: Long-Acting Beta Agonists - FDA]
[02/18/2010 - Press Release - FDA]

Advair Diskus (fluticasone propionate and salmeterol inhalation powder): Stolen Product Warning

Jul 16, 2010

Audience: Pharmacy, Pulmonology, Patient

ISSUE: Certain Advair Diskus inhalers stolen from a distribution warehouse in 2009 have been found in some pharmacies. The safety and effectiveness of the stolen inhalers cannot be assured and they should not be used.

The lot numbers, doses, and quantities of the stolen Advair Diskus inhalers are:

  • Lot 9ZP2255 - NDC 0173-0696-00, Advair Diskus 250/50, 60 Dose, Exp: Sep 2010 (14,400 inhalers)
  • Lot 9ZP3325 - NDC 0173-0697-00, Advair Diskus 500/50, 60 Dose, Exp: Sep 2010 (11,200 inhalers)

BACKGROUND: Advair Diskus (fluticasone propionate and salmeterol inhalation powder) is an inhaler used to treat patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The products were reported stolen in August 2009 from a GlaxoSmithKline warehouse near Richmond, Va. The inhalers found recently were the first from the stolen lots to be found in commerce. However, more stolen product may still be on the market and the FDA continues to aggressively investigate the matter.

Stolen medicine may be harmful because it may have been stored at the wrong temperature or humidity or other improper conditions, may degrade or lose potency, become contaminated, or may have been tampered with or handled improperly while outside of the legitimate supply chain.

RECOMMENDATION: Patients who have products with these lot numbers should immediately stop using them, contact GlaxoSmithKline’s Customer Response Center at 888-825-5249, and follow-up with their physician or pharmacist to obtain a proper replacement.

Pharmacists and wholesalers who find Advair Diskus inhalers bearing these lot numbers should remove them from shelves and contact the FDA’s Office of Criminal Investigations (OCI) at 800-551-3989. The agency also is asking for the public's help in reporting any information regarding these inhalers, including suspicious or unsolicited offers for the Advair Diskus lots in question, to OCI or by visiting the OCI website.


[07/16/2010 - News Release - FDA]

    

Long-Acting Beta-Agonists (LABAs): New Safe Use Requirements

Jun 3, 2010

Audience: Asthma management healthcare professionals, patients

[UPDATED 06/03/2010] Drug labels now contain updated recommendations.

[Posted 02/18/2010] FDA notified healthcare professionals and consumers that, due to safety concerns, FDA is requiring a risk management strategy (REMS) and class-labeling changes for all LABAs. The REMS will require a revised Medication Guide written specifically for patients, and a plan to educate healthcare professionals about the appropriate use of LABAs. These changes are based on FDA's analyses of studies showing an increased risk of severe exacerbation of asthma symptoms, leading to hospitalizations in pediatric and adult patients as well as death in some patients using LABAs for the treatment of asthma. 

Healthcare professionals are reminded that to ensure the safe use of these products:

  • Single-ingredient LABAs should only be used in combination with an asthma controller medication; they should not be used alone.
  • LABAs should only be used long-term in patients whose asthma cannot be adequately controlled on asthma controller medications.
  • LABAs should be used for the shortest duration of time required to achieve control of asthma symptoms and discontinued, if possible, once asthma control is achieved. Patients should then be maintained on an asthma controller medication.
  • Pediatric and adolescent patients who require the addition of a LABA to an inhaled corticosteroid should use a combination product containing both an inhaled corticosteroid and a LABA, to ensure compliance with both medications.

FDA has determined that the benefits of LABAs in improving asthma symptoms outweigh the potential risks when used appropriately with an asthma controller medication in patients who need the addition of LABAs. FDA believes the safety measures recommended will improve the safe use of these drugs.

[06/03/2010 - Drug Safety Communication - FDA]
[02/18/2010 - Drug Safety Communication - FDA]
[02/18/2010 - Questions and Answers: Long-Acting Beta Agonists - FDA]
[02/18/2010 - Press Release - FDA]

    

Advair Diskus (fluticasone propionate & salmeterol inhalation powder)

Nov 18, 2005

Audience: Pulmonologists, other healthcare professionals and consumers

[Posted 11/18/2005] FDA notified manufacturers of Advair Diskus, Foradil Aerolizer, and Serevent Diskus to update their existing product labels with new warnings and a Medication Guide for patients to alert health care professionals and patients that these medicines may increase the chance of severe asthma episodes, and death when those episodes occur. All of these products contain long-acting beta2-adrenergic agonists (LABA). Even though LABAs decrease the frequency of asthma episodes, these medicines may make asthma episodes more severe when they occur. A Medication Guide with information about these risks will be given to patients when a prescription for a LABA is filled or refilled.

Advair Diskus (fluticasone propionate and salmeterol inhalation powder)

Aug 15, 2003

Audience: Pulmonary specialists and other healthcare professionals

The FDA announced the addition of new safety information and warnings to the labeling for drug products that contain salmeterol, a long-acting bronchodilator used to treat asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The new labeling includes a boxed warning about a small, but significant, increased risk of life-threatening asthma episodes or asthma-related deaths observed in patients taking salmeterol in a recently completed large U.S. safety study.

[August 2003 Letter - GlaxoSmithKline]
[August 14, 2003 Talk Paper - FDA]
[August 2003 Revised label, Serevent - GlaxoSmithKline]
[August 2003 Revised label, Serevent Diskus - GlaxoSmithKline]
[August 2003 Revised label, Advair Diskus - GlaxoSmithKline]

More Advair Diskus Resources