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Sublimaze FDA Alerts

The FDA Alerts below may be specifically about Sublimaze or relate to a group or class of drugs which include Sublimaze.

MedWatch Safety Alerts are distributed by the FDA and published by Drugs.com. Following is a list of possible medication recalls, market withdrawals, alerts and warnings.

Recent FDA Alerts for Sublimaze

Opioid Pain Relievers or Medicines to Treat Opioid Use Disorder - FDA Recommends Health Care Professionals Discuss Naloxone with All Patients when Prescribing

ISSUE: FDA is requiring drug manufacturers for all opioid pain relievers and medicines to treat opioid use disorder (OUD) to add new recommendations about naloxone to the prescribing information.  This will help ensure that health care professionals discuss the availability of naloxone and assess each patient’s need for a naloxone prescription when opioid pain relievers or medicines to treat OUD are being prescribed or renewed.  The patient Medication Guides will also be updated.

BACKGROUND: Opioid pain relievers are medicines that can help manage pain when other treatments and medicines are not able to provide enough pain relief.  Certain opioids are also used to treat OUD.  Opioids have serious risks, including misuse and abuse, addiction, overdose, and death.  Naloxone can help reverse opioid overdose to prevent death.

The misuse and abuse of illicit and prescription opioids and the risks of addiction, overdose, and death are a public health crisis in the United States.  As a result, FDA is committed to encouraging health care professionals to raise awareness of the availability of naloxone when they are prescribing and dispensing opioid pain relievers or medicines to treat OUD.  FDA held discussions about naloxone availability with the Anesthetic and Analgesic Drug Products and the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committees, which recommended that all patients being prescribed opioids for use in the outpatient setting would benefit from a conversation with their health care professional about the availability of naloxone. 

RECOMMENDATION:
Patients: 

  • Talk to your health care professionals about the benefits of naloxone and how to obtain it.  
  • Recognize the signs and symptoms of a possible opioid overdose.  These include slowed, shallow, or difficult breathing, severe sleepiness, or not being able to respond or wake up.  If you know or think someone is overdosing, give the person naloxone if you have access to it, and always call 911 or go to an emergency room right away.  Naloxone is a temporary treatment, so repeat doses may be required.  Even if you give naloxone, you still need to get emergency medical help right away.
  • If you have naloxone, make sure to tell your caregivers, household members, and other close contacts that you have it, where it is stored, and how to properly use it in the event of an overdose.  When using opioid medicines away from home, carry naloxone with you and let those you are with know you have it, where it is, and how to use it.  Read the Patient Information leaflet or other educational material and Instructions for Use that comes with your naloxone because it explains important information, including how to use the medicine.  

Health Care Professionals: 

  • Discuss the availability of naloxone with all patients when prescribing or renewing an opioid analgesic or medicine to treat OUD.  
  • Consider prescribing naloxone to patients prescribed medicines to treat OUD and patients prescribed opioid analgesics who are at increased risk of opioid overdose.  
  • Consider prescribing naloxone when a patient has household members, including children, or other close contacts at risk for accidental ingestion or opioid overdose.
  • Additionally, even if the patients are not receiving a prescription for an opioid analgesic or medicine to treat OUD, consider prescribing naloxone to them if they are at increased risk of opioid overdose. 
  • Educate patients and caregivers on how to recognize respiratory depression and how to administer naloxone.  Inform them about their options for obtaining naloxone as permitted by their individual state dispensing and prescribing requirements or guidelines for naloxone. Emphasize the importance of calling 911 or getting emergency medical help right away, even if naloxone is administered. 

Patients and health care professionals are encouraged to report adverse events or side effects related to the use of these products to the FDA's MedWatch Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program:

  • Complete and submit the report online.
  • Download form or call 1-800-332-1088 to request a reporting form, then complete and return to the address on the form, or submit by fax to 1-800-FDA-0178

[07/23/2020 - Drug Safety Communication - FDA] 

Source: FDA


Alvogen Inc. Issues Voluntary Nationwide Recall of Fentanyl Transdermal System Due to Product Mislabeling

April 19, 2019 -- Alvogen, Inc. is voluntarily recalling two lots of Fentanyl Transdermal System 12 mcg/h transdermal patches to the consumer level. A small number of cartons labeled 12 mcg/h Fentanyl Transdermal System patches contained 50 mcg/h patches. The 50 mcg/h patches that were included in cartons labeled 12 mcg/h are individually labeled as 50 mcg/h. This transdermal system is manufactured by 3M Drug Delivery Systems, St. Paul, MN.

Application of a 50 mcg/h patch instead of a prescribed 12 mcg/h patch could result in serious, life threatening, or fatal respiratory depression. Groups at potential increased risk could include first time recipients of such patches, children, and the elderly. To date, Alvogen Inc. has not received any reports of adverse events related to this issue.

The product is indicated for the management of pain in opioid tolerant patients and is packaged in primary cartons of five individually wrapped and labeled pouches. The affected Fentanyl Transdermal System lots include:

Lot 180060 of Fentanyl Transdermal System, 12 mcg/h, expiration date 05/2020.

Lot 180073 of Fentanyl Transdermal System, 12 mcg/h, expiration date 06/2020.

The mislabeled product is packaged in a 12 mcg/h primary carton. These lots of Fentanyl Transdermal System were distributed Nationwide to the pharmacy level.

See images example for lot 180073.

Alvogen Inc. is notifying its distributors and direct customers by certified letter and is arranging for return and replacement of all recalled products. Pharmacies are requested not to dispense any product subject to this recall. Patients that have product subject to this recall should immediately remove any patch currently in use and contact their health care provider. Patients with unused product should return it to point of purchase for replacement.

Questions regarding this recall should be directed to Alvogen Customer Complaints by calling 866-770-3024 or sending an e-mail to pharmacovigilance@alvogen.com from Monday to Friday from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm EST. Consumers should contact their physician or health care provider if they have experienced any problems that may be related to taking or using this drug product.

Adverse reactions or quality problems experienced with the use of this product may be reported to the FDA's MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program either online, by regular mail or by fax.


Injectable Products by SCA Pharmaceuticals: Recall - Potential Contamination

ISSUE: SCA Pharmaceuticals LLC (“SCA Pharmaceuticals”) is voluntarily recalling various lots of injectable products to the hospital level. There is a potential for the products to contain microbial contamination.  See the recall notice for a full list of products.

BACKGROUND: Administration of a drug product, intended to be sterile, that may contain microbial contamination has the potential to result in serious adverse events which may include life-threatening infections. SCA Pharmaceuticals has not received any customer complaints or reports of adverse events related to this issue.

RECOMMENDATION: SCA Pharmaceuticals is notifying its customers via telephone, email and US mail and is arranging for return/replacement of all recalled products. Customers that have product which is being recalled, as indicated in the list above, should discontinue use immediately and return the product to SCA Pharmaceuticals.

Consumers with questions regarding this recall can contact SCA Pharmaceuticals at 877-550-5059, between the hours of 8:00 am and 5:00 pm (Central Standard Time), Monday thru Friday. Consumers should contact their physician or healthcare provider if they have experienced any problems that may be related to taking or using this drug product.

Healthcare professionals and patients are encouraged to report adverse events or side effects related to the use of these products to the FDA's MedWatch Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program:

[10/20/2017 - Recall Notice - SCA Pharmaceuticals]


Compounded Drugs Stored in Becton-Dickinson (BD) 3 ml and 5 ml Syringes: FDA Warning - Do Not Use

ISSUE: FDA is alerting health care professionals not to administer to patients compounded or repackaged drugs that have been stored in 3 milliliter (ml) and 5ml syringes manufactured by Becton-Dickinson (BD) unless there is no suitable alternative available. Preliminary information indicates that drugs stored in these syringes may lose potency over a period of time due to a possible interaction with the rubber stopper in the syringe.

If you have been using products packaged in these syringes, be aware that using a substitute product may require a dosage adjustment in case the patient has been receiving a subpotent product, or adverse consequences could occur.

BD’s 10ml, 20ml and 30ml syringes may also contain the same rubber stopper. The company is alerting their customers not to use these syringes as a closed container system for compounded and repackaged drugs.

BACKGROUND: FDA has cleared these syringes as medical devices for general purpose fluid aspiration and injection only.  These syringes were not cleared for use as a closed container storage system for drug products, and the suitability of these syringes for that purpose has not been established.  This issue may extend to other general use syringes made by other manufacturers that were not cleared for the purpose of closed-container storage usage. FDA has received several reports of compounded and repackaged drugs, such as fentanyl, morphine, methadone and atropine, losing potency when stored in BD 3ml and 5ml general purpose syringes. It is possible that this chemical reaction may affect other compounded and repackaged drugs stored in syringes not FDA cleared for closed-container storage.

RECOMMENDATION: Hospital and pharmacy staff should check supply stocks and remove drug products that were filled by pharmacies or outsourcing facilities and stored in general purpose BD 3ml and 5ml syringes.  These syringes are marked with the BD logo at the base of the syringe. At this time, FDA does not have information on how long drugs can be stored in these syringes before degrading. There is no information to suggest that there is a problem with potency or drug degradation when medication is administered promptly after the syringes are filled.

This warning does not extend to products approved by FDA for marketing as pre-filled syringes, because as part of the approval process, FDA has determined that these products have been shown to maintain stability in the syringe container through the expiration date on the product.

The FDA is continuing to investigate this issue and will provide more information when it is available.

Healthcare professionals and patients are encouraged to report adverse events or side effects related to the use of these products to the FDA's MedWatch Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program:

[08/18/2015 - Warning - FDA]
 


Fentanyl Transdermal System: Recall - Potential for Active Ingredient to Release Faster Than Specified

[Posted 10/22/2010]

 

UPDATED 11/05/2010. Consumers encouraged to return any product in their possession from the October 2010 recall.

ISSUE: FDA notified healthcare professionals and patients that laboratory testing identified a patch that released its active ingredient faster than the approved specification. An accelerated release of Fentanyl can lead to adverse events for at-risk patients, including excessive sedation, respiratory depression, hypoventilation (slow breathing), and apnea (temporary suspension of breathing). 

BACKGROUND: Fentanyl Transdermal System is indicated for the management of persistent, moderate to severe chronic pain that requires continuous, around-the-clock opioid administration for an extended period of time and cannot be managed by other means such as non-steroidal analgesics, opioid combination products, or immediate release opioids. The product is manufactured for Actavis by Corium International in the United States.

RECOMMENDATION: Wholesalers and retailers are being asked to return the product they have on hand or in stock. See the Press Release for recalled product lots. The Control/Lot number appears on the bottom of the product box and on the black and white side of each individual patch packaging, in the lower left corner.
 
Healthcare professionals and patients are encouraged to report adverse events or side effects related to the use of these products to the FDA's MedWatch Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program:

 

[11/04/2010 - Press Release - Actavis, Inc.]
[10/21/2010 - Press Release - Actavis, Inc.]

    

Fentanyl Transdermal System: Recall - Potential for Active Ingredient to Release Faster Than Specified

ISSUE: FDA notified healthcare professionals and patients that laboratory testing identified a patch that released its active ingredient faster than the approved specification. An accelerated release of Fentanyl can lead to adverse events for at-risk patients, including excessive sedation, respiratory depression, hypoventilation (slow breathing), and apnea (temporary suspension of breathing). 

BACKGROUND: Fentanyl Transdermal System is indicated for the management of persistent, moderate to severe chronic pain that requires continuous, around-the-clock opioid administration for an extended period of time and cannot be managed by other means such as non-steroidal analgesics, opioid combination products, or immediate release opioids. The product is manufactured for Actavis by Corium International in the United States.

RECOMMENDATION: Wholesalers and retailers are being asked to return the product they have on hand or in stock. See the Press Release for recalled product lots. The Control/Lot number appears on the bottom of the product box and on the black and white side of each individual patch packaging, in the lower left corner.
 
Healthcare professionals and patients are encouraged to report adverse events or side effects related to the use of these products to the FDA's MedWatch Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program:

 

[10/21/2010 - Press Release - Actavis Inc.]

    

Fentanyl Transdermal System CII Patches

[UPDATED 03/03/2008] Actavis Inc. has voluntarily recalled of all lots of Fentanyl Transdermal System CII patches sold in the United States.

[Posted 02/19/2008] Actavis Inc. announced a nationwide recall of certain lots of Fentanyl transdermal system CII Patches sold in the United States and labelled with an Abrika or Actavis label. The product may have a fold-over defect which can cause the patch to leak and expose patients or caregivers directly to the fentanyl gel. Exposure to fentanyl gel may lead to serious adverse events, including respiratory depression and possible overdose, which may be fatal. The lots covered by this recall include doses of 25, 50, 75, and 100 mcg/hr and are listed in the firm's press release.

[March 01, 2008 - Press Release - Actavis]
[February 17, 2008 - Press Release - Actavis]

Fentanyl transdermal system CII Patches

[Posted 02/19/2008] Actavis Inc. announced a nationwide recall of certain lots of Fentanyl transdermal system CII Patches sold in the United States and labelled with an Abrika or Actavis label. The product may have a fold-over defect which can cause the patch to leak and expose patients or caregivers directly to the fentanyl gel. Exposure to fentanyl gel may lead to serious adverse events, including respiratory depression and possible overdose, which may be fatal. The lots covered by this recall include doses of 25, 50, 75, and 100 mcg/hr and are listed in the firm's press release.

[February 17, 2008 - Press Release - Actavis]

Duragesic 25 mcg/hr (fentanyl transdermal system) CII Pain Patches

[Posted 02/15/2008] PriCara and Sandoz Inc. announced a nationwide recall of all lots of 25 mcg/hr Duragesic Patches sold in the United States. The product is being recalled because the patches may have a cut along one side of the drug reservoir within the patch which may result in the possible release of fentanyl gel that may expose patients or caregivers directly to fentanyl gel on the skin. Fentanyl is a potent Schedule II opioid medication and exposure to the gel may lead to serious adverse events, including respiratory depression and possible overdose, that may be fatal. Patches with a cut edge should not be used. These recalled patches have expiration dates on or before December 2009 and are all manufactured by ALZA Corporation.

[February 12, 2008 - Press Release - PriCara]

Fentanyl Transdermal System (marketed as Duragesic and generics)

[Posted 12/21/2007] FDA issued an update that highlights important information on appropriate prescribing, dose selection, and the safe use of the fentanyl transdermal system (patch). FDA previously issued a Public Health Advisory and Information for Healthcare Professionals in July 2005 regarding the appropriate and safe use of the transdermal system. However, the Agency continues to receive reports of death and life-threatening adverse events related to fentanyl overdose that have occurred when the fentanyl patch was used to treat pain in opioid-naive patients and when opioid-tolerant patients have applied more patches than prescribed, changed the patch too frequently, and exposed the patch to a heat source. The fentanyl patch is only indicated for use in patients with persistent, moderate to severe chronic pain who have been taking a regular, daily, around-the-clock narcotic pain medicine for longer than a week and are considered to be opioid-tolerant.

Patients must avoid exposing the patch to excessive heat as this promotes the release of fentanyl from the patch and increases the absorption of fentanyl through the skin which can result in fatal overdose. Directions for prescribing and using the fentanyl patch must be followed exactly to prevent death or other serious side effects from fentanyl overdose.


Fentanyl Transdermal (Skin) Patch

[Posted 07/15/2005] FDA issued a public health advisory to alert health care professionals, patients and their caregivers of reports of death and other serious side effects from overdoses of fentanyl in patients using fentanyl transdermal (skin) patches for pain control. Deaths and overdoses have occurred in patients using both the brand name product Duragesic and the generic product. Some patients and health care providers may not be fully aware of the dangers of this very strong narcotic painkiller. The directions for using the fentanyl skin patch must be followed exactly to prevent death or other serious side effects from overdosing with fentanyl. These directions are available on the Drug Information Page linked below.

[July 15, 2005 - Public Health Advisory - FDA]
[July 15, 2005 - Healthcare Professional Sheet [PDF] [HTML] - FDA]
[July 15, 2005 - Patient Information Sheet [PDF] [HTML] - FDA]
[July 15, 2005 - Drug Information Page - FDA]

Injectable drugs prepared by Urgent Care Pharmacy

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced a nationwide alert concerning all injectable drugs prepared by Urgent Care Pharmacy of Spartanburg, South Carolina, based on the lack of assurance that their products are sterile. Non-sterility of injectable products can represent a serious hazard to health that could lead to life-threatening injuries and death. FDA inspection of Urgent Care's facility revealed the firm failed to have adequate controls to ensure necessary sterility, including the absence of appropriate testing for potency and sterility prior to distribution.

FDA is aware that Urgent Care has distributed the following injectable drugs to physicians, hospitals, clinics and consumers in Connecticut, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Mississippi, New Hampshire, North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia: Baclofen, Betamethasone, Bimix 30:1, (Phentolamine mesylate/papaverine), Clonidine, Estradiol, Hydromorphone HCl, Fentanyl, methylprednisolone acetate, Morphine Sulfate/Bupivacaine, Papaverine HCl, Super Trimix (Papaverine HCl/phentolamine mesylate/prostaglandin), Testosterone cypionate, Testosterone/Estradiol.

[November 15, 2002 Talk Paper - FDA]

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