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Bacitracin for Injection

Last Updated: March 4, 2020
Status: Discontinued

Products Affected - Description
    • Baciim intramuscular powder for solution for injection, X-Gen, 5000 units, vial, 10 count, NDC 39822-0277-02 - discontinued
    • Bacitracin intramuscular powder for solution for injection, Fresenius Kabi, 5000 units, vial, 10 count, NDC 63323-0329-31 - discontinued
    • Bacitracin intramuscular powder for solution for injection, Fresenius Kabi, 5000 units, vial, NDC 63323-0329-30 - discontinued
    • Bacitracin intramuscular powder for solution for injection, Pfizer, 5000 units, vial, 10 count, NDC 00009-0233-03 - discontinued
    • Bacitracin intramuscular powder for solution for injection, Pfizer, 5000 units, vial, NDC 00009-0233-01 - discontinued
    • Bacitracin intramuscular powder for solution for injection, Xellia Pharmaceuticals, 5000 units, vial, 10 count, NDC 70594-0026-02 - discontinued
Reason for the Shortage
    • FDA requested that all manufacturers of bacitracin for injection voluntarily withdraw their product from the market. More information is available at the following link: https://www.fda.gov/drugs/drug-safety-and-availability/fda-requests-withdrawal-bacitracin-injection-market
Available Products
    • There are no presentations available

Estimated Resupply Dates

    • FDA requested that all manufacturers of bacitracin for injection voluntarily withdraw their product from the market. More information is available at the following link: https://www.fda.gov/drugs/drug-safety-and-availability/fda-requests-withdrawal-bacitracin-injection-market. All products will be discontinued.

Implications for Patient Care

    • Bacitracin for intramuscular injection is labeled for treatment of pneumonia and empyema in infants. The product is most frequently used for intraoperative irrigation of surgical wounds. FDA published a report in April 2019 that describes the evidence for use of bacitracin irrigations, as well as information about adverse reactions. The report can be found at the following link: https://www.fda.gov/media/123641/download
    • The guidelines for antimicrobial prophylaxis in surgery developed by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, the Infectious Diseases Society of America, the Surgical Infection Society, and the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America do not support the use of antimicrobial irrigation solutions due to lack of evidence demonstrating additional benefits over use of intravenous antimicrobial prophylaxis alone.[1]

References

    1. Bratzler, D.W., et al., Clinical practice guidelines for antimicrobial prophylaxis in surgery. Am J Health Syst Pharm, 2013. 70(3): p. 195-283.

Updated

Updated March 4, 2020 by Michelle Wheeler, PharmD, Drug Information Specialist. Created February 3, 2020 by Rachael Freeman, PharmD, BCPS. © 2020, Drug Information Service, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT.

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.