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Drug interactions between bedaquiline and moxifloxacin

Results for the following 2 drugs:
bedaquiline
moxifloxacin

Interactions between your drugs

Major

moxifloxacin ↔ bedaquiline

Applies to:moxifloxacin and bedaquiline

Using moxifloxacin together with bedaquiline can increase the risk of an irregular heart rhythm that may be serious and potentially life-threatening, although it is a relatively rare side effect. You may be more susceptible if you have a heart condition called congenital long QT syndrome, other cardiac diseases, conduction abnormalities, or electrolyte disturbances (for example, magnesium or potassium loss due to severe or prolonged diarrhea or vomiting). Talk to your doctor if you have any questions or concerns. Your doctor may already be aware of the risks, but has determined that this is the best course of treatment for you and has taken appropriate precautions and is monitoring you closely for any potential complications. You should seek immediate medical attention if you develop sudden dizziness, lightheadedness, fainting, shortness of breath, or heart palpitations during treatment with these medications, whether together or alone. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

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Drug and food interactions

Moderate

bedaquiline food

Applies to: bedaquiline

Food significantly increases the absorption of bedaquiline. Therefore, you should take each dose of bedaquiline with food. Taking it on an empty stomach may lead to inadequate blood levels and reduced effectiveness of the medication in treating tuberculosis. Avoid alcohol during treatment with bedaquiline, as it may increase the risk of liver damage. You should seek immediate medical attention if you develop signs and symptoms of liver damage such as fever, chills, joint pain or swelling, unusual bleeding or bruising, skin rash, itching, loss of appetite, fatigue, nausea, vomiting, dark colored urine, light colored stools, and yellowing of the skin or eyes. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

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Therapeutic duplication warnings

No therapeutic duplications were found for your selected drugs.

Drug Interaction Classification

The classifications below are a guideline only. The relevance of a particular drug interaction to a specific patient is difficult to determine using this tool alone given the large number of variables that may apply.
Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.
Unknown No information available.

Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider.

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

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