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Related terms: E. Coli Enteritis, E. Coli Infection, Traveler's diarrhea, E. coli

Health Tip: Prepare Homemade Baby Food

Posted 12 days ago by Drugs.com

-- Some new parents enjoy making homemade baby food. But it's important to follow safety guidelines to help prevent food poisoning. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics advises: Thoroughly wash your hands, as well as any utensils and containers that will be used to prepare and store baby food. Wash all produce, and carefully peel and remove all pits and seeds. Use caution with produce grown close to the ground, which may harbor germs. Steam or microwave vegetables until soft, then puree. Never add salt, honey or corn syrup. Never add egg whites until after the child's first birthday. Always make sure egg whites are well cooked. Thoroughly cook all meat, eggs and poultry. Immediately refrigerate or freeze baby food in a sealed container after cooking. It can be stored one-to-two days in the refrigerator, or three-to four months in the freezer. Add a dated label so you know the food is ... Read more

Related support groups: Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

US Medical Groups Sound the Alarm on Climate Change

Posted 14 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 15, 2017 – Climate change is not only an environmental issue, but a major threat to public health, according to 11 U.S. medical societies. It's an issue that many people do not know exists, even though it may already affect them, the groups warned in a new report. "We want to get the message out that climate change is affecting people's health right now," said Dr. Mona Sarfaty. She's director of the group collective the Medical Society Consortium on Climate and Health. More frequent and more intense heat waves raise the risk of heat-related illness, for example. Climate change can also exacerbate heart and lung conditions, including asthma and emphysema, said Sarfaty, who's also director of Program on Climate and Health at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va. And, it can feed the spread of insect-borne infections, such as Lyme disease and Zika, and even contribute ... Read more

Related support groups: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Heart Disease, Bronchitis, Lyme Disease, Gastroenteritis, Bronchiectasis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Traveler's Diarrhea, Ischemic Heart Disease, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis, Zika Virus Infection

Health Tip: Clean Your Refrigerator

Posted 2 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

-- A clean refrigerator can help prevent food-related illness. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics offers these suggestions: Immediately clean up spilled juices, particularly from raw meat. To defrost, always put uncooked meat on the bottom shelf inside a container with a lid. Use warm, soapy water and a sponge to clean shelves, drawers and other surfaces. Avoid spray cleaners. Dry with a clean paper towel or cloth. Clean the door handle frequently. Place an open box of baking soda inside your fridge to absorb odors. Change it every three months. Wipe away dust from the front grill of your refrigerator to keep it working efficiently. Read more

Related support groups: Gastrointestinal Disorders, Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Health Tip: Reheat Food Safely

Posted 27 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Leftovers are a great way to enjoy a healthy, easy meal that you've already spent time to prepare. But, thorough reheating is important to avoid food poisoning. The Foodsafety.gov website advises: Only reheat and eat leftovers that were stored properly, within two hours of cooking. Do not use a slow cooker to reheat food. When reheating in a microwave, make sure your food is covered and is evenly distributed. Use a food thermometer to make sure food is re-heated to 165 degrees. Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

For a Fun and Safe Tropical Getaway, Plan Ahead

Posted 17 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Feb. 17, 2017 – If you're planning a tropical getaway, be sure to pack old standbys like bug spray and sunscreen – and maybe a lot more, a doctor advises. "In places like the Caribbean and South and Central America, where it is already summertime, people can potentially be exposed to health risks that they may not have at home," said infectious disease specialist Dr. Christopher Ohl. He is head of the International Travel Clinic at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, N.C. In the Caribbean and Central America, you can get sunburned in as little as 10 minutes. Wear sunscreen and a T-shirt or cover-up during the middle of the day when the sun is strongest, Ohl advised in a center news release. Be especially careful on the beach or at poolside where the water reflects sunlight. Also, be careful about what you eat and drink to reduce the risk of diarrhea. Safest ... Read more

Related support groups: Plan B, Mirena, Nexplanon, NuvaRing, Provera, Sprintec, Depo-Provera, Implanon, Ortho Tri-Cyclen, Tri-Sprintec, Microgestin Fe 1/20, Yasmin, Loestrin 24 Fe, Plan B One-Step, Ortho Evra, TriNessa, Mononessa, Lutera, Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo, Yaz

Health Tip: Enjoying Rare Meat Safely

Posted 6 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

-- If you prefer rare meat to well done, you might be wondering if the rare variety is safe. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics explains: A food thermometer should be used to make sure rare meat is hot enough to destroy any germs. Avoid using other cues, such as the color of meat, the color of juices or the firmness of meat, to determine if it's sufficiently cooked. Ground lamb, pork, veal or beef should be cooked to at least 160 degrees Fahrenheit at its center. Whole steak needs to be cooked to 145 degrees Fahrenheit at its center. Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Don't Let Food Poisoning Ruin Your Holiday Celebration

Posted 23 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 23, 2016 – Party guests always seem to wind up in the host's kitchen, but too many cooks boost the risk of mistakes that could lead to food poisoning, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The group says it's also important to keep food safety in mind when preparing homemade food gifts and holiday buffets. It offers these tips: Wash hands before, during and after preparing food. It's also important to wash when switching from one task to another. All kitchen surfaces – including appliances, countertops, cutting boards and utensils – should be kept clean throughout the cooking process. Use hot, soapy water. Never cut raw meat, poultry or fish on the same cutting board as foods like fruits and vegetables that don't have to be cooked. Using color-coded cutting boards can make it easier to remember which one to use for each food. Use different utensils for ... Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea Prophylaxis

How to Ship Food Gifts Without Risk

Posted 22 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 21, 2016 – Homemade food gifts can make loved ones afar feel closer, but it's important to take extra safety precautions to prevent food poisoning, according to the American Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AAND). Bacteria that cause food-borne illnesses grow quickly at temperatures between 40 degrees and 140 degrees Fahrenheit, potentially doubling every 20 minutes, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. When shipping perishable items, make sure they are kept below 40 degrees, AAND advises. Let the recipient know a perishable package is on the way and be sure someone will be home to receive it. Even foods that are smoked, cured or fully cooked should be kept cold. This can be done using dry ice and foam or heavy corrugated cardboard packaging, the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service recommends. Whenever ... Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Salmonella Enteric Fever, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Health Tip: Using a Food Thermometer

Posted 9 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Using a food thermometer takes the guesswork out of determining whether food is cooked completely and is safe to eat. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics suggests the right way to use a food thermometer: Select the right type of thermometer for your needs, from pop-up to digital to manual. Make sure you follow product instructions. Use either ice water or freezing water to make sure the thermometer is accurate. Wait the recommended amount of time before you read your thermometer. Make sure you know the safe temperature for the type of food you are cooking. After using, always clean your thermometer with hot, soapy water. Read more

Related support groups: Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Health Tip: Prep Your Refrigerator for the Holidays

Posted 8 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Your fridge may be overflowing with leftovers from holiday meals. Here are some tips to safely preserve all that food, courtesy of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Set the fridge temperature between 33 and 40 degrees Fahrenheit, and your freezer at 0 degrees Fahrenheit or lower. Make sure you store any meat, eggs, veggies and milk within two hours. Place raw meat on the bottom shelf, away from produce or ready-to-eat food. If any food is left out at room temperature for longer than two hours, throw it away. Place foods being thawed or marinated in the refrigerator. Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Health Tip: Cooking a Holiday Ham

Posted 6 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

-- If you're cooking a holiday ham, make sure it's properly prepared to prevent foodborne illness. The U.S. Department of Agriculture advises: Set the oven temperature to at least 325 degrees Fahrenheit to reheat a fully cooked, packaged ham. Cook until the internal temperature reaches 140 degrees Fahrenheit. Use a food thermometer to detect the temperature. Heat a smoked packaged ham to an internal temperature of 165 degrees Fahrenheit. Cook a fresh ham to an internal temperature of 140 degrees Fahrenheit. Let sit for three minutes before serving. Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Food Safety Not Always on Menu of TV Cooking Shows

Posted 11 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 11, 2016 – Safe food-handling procedures are often lacking on TV cooking shows, a new study finds. Researchers at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, said if TV cooks fail to demonstrate safe practices, it may lead to unhealthy food preparation in viewers' home kitchens. For the study, the researchers looked at the use of utensils and gloves, protection from contamination, and time and temperature control in 39 episodes of 10 popular cooking shows. They also noted whether the shows mentioned food safety. The findings were published in the November-December issue of the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior. "The majority of practices rated were out of compliance or conformance with recommendations in at least 70 percent of episodes, and food safety practices were mentioned in only three episodes," said study lead author Nancy Cohen, a professor of nutrition at ... Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis

Health Tip: Keeping Foods Separate During Grilling

Posted 26 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

-- It's important to prevent cross-contamination of food while grilling. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics advises: Make sure your grill is clean before you begin. Remove any leftover food particles. Don't put cooked food back on the same plate that held raw food. Wash with hot soapy water first, or use a different plate. Use separate grilling utensils to turn food once it's cooked, or thoroughly clean utensils after handling raw food. Never use marinade that contained raw meat to baste cooked meat. Read more

Related support groups: Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea Prophylaxis

Health Tip: Shop for the Freshest Fish

Posted 23 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Fish is a healthy addition to your menu, but it's important to keep it fresh. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration advises: Shopping for fish displayed on a thick pack of fresh ice in a case. Making sure there is no fishy, sour or ammonia-like odor. Fish should always smell mild and fresh. Looking at the fish's eyes to make sure they are clear and bulging, that gills are bright red (without slime) and that the flesh is shiny, firm and bounces back when you press it. Avoiding fish with signs of darkening or dryness at the edges. Choosing shrimp and other seafood that shines and has no odor. Read more

Related support groups: Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis

Food, Even Water Can Spoil When the Power Goes Out

Posted 22 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 22, 2016 – Power outages can be more than an inconvenience. They can cause problems with your food and water that could put your family's health at risk. If the power is out for less than four hours, food in your refrigerator and freezer will be safe to eat, but you should keep the appliance doors closed, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says. If the power is out more than four hours, pack milk and other dairy products, meat, fish, eggs, gravy and spoilable leftovers into a cooler with ice. A freezer that is full will hold food safely for 48 hours, while a half-full freezer will hold food safely for up to 24 hours, the CDC said in a news release. Avoid opening the freezer door. Before you use any food, check its temperature with a food thermometer. Toss out anything with a temperature above 40 degrees Fahrenheit. Power outages also may cause water ... Read more

Related support groups: Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis

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