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Surgery News

Face-Saving Devices: Seat Belts and Air Bags

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 22, 2016 – Seat belts and air bags significantly reduce the risk of facial fractures in car crashes, a new study finds. "Based on our analysis, we found that use of an air bag alone reduced the likelihood of a facial fracture by 18 percent while use of a seat belt alone decreased likelihood by 43 percent," said study co-leader Dr. Scott Chaiet, a head and neck surgeon at the University of Wisconsin when the study was conducted. "Use of both decreased the chances of facial fractures in a crash by 53 percent," he added in a university news release. Researchers analyzed 2007-12 data from more than 518,000 people in the United States who required treatment at a trauma center after a motor vehicle collision. More than 56,000 (nearly 11 percent) suffered facial fractures – nasal and mid-face fractures most often. Those most likely to suffer facial fractures were younger males ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Fracture, bone, Compression Fracture of Vertebral Column, Prevention of Fractures

Is Surgery Always Needed for Meniscal Tears of the Knee?

Posted 5 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 20, 2016 – A meniscal tear is a common and disabling knee injury affecting many Americans at some point in their lives. Now, new research suggests that in many cases, exercise may work just as well as surgery to heal the condition in middle-aged people. Meniscal tears occur when damage is done to the rubbery discs that cushion the knee joint. According to the European research team, about 2 million people worldwide undergo surgeries known as knee arthroscopy each year – although there's debate over how valuable these procedures are for meniscal tears. To help settle the matter, a team led by Nina Jullum Kise, an orthopedic surgeon at Martina Hansens Hospital in Sandvika, Norway, tracked outcomes for 140 patients. These patients averaged 50 years of age and had degenerative meniscal tears, largely without any signs of arthritis. Half of the patients performed two to ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery

Cornea Transplants Riskier for Women When They Come From Men?

Posted 11 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 15, 2016 – Women who undergo a cornea transplant may have a worse outcome if their donor is a man, a new study suggests. Subtle differences between men and women may increase the risk of failure or rejection for up to five years, the British researchers found. They noted that matching the gender of cornea donors and recipients could help improve transplant outcomes. The study involved more than 18,100 cornea transplant patients. More than 80 percent still had a working cornea after five years. Of those who had a failed transplant or tissue rejection, more were women who had received a cornea from a male donor. On average, 180 transplants fail for every 1,000 gender-matched procedures, compared with 220 failures among every 1,000 male-to-female transplants, according to the researchers. They said these results were especially evident among patients with Fuchs endothelial ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Eye Conditions, Cataract, Corneal Abrasion, Corneal Ulcer, Ophthalmic Surgery, Visual Defect/Disturbance, Corneal Refractive Surgery

CDC Warns of Dangers of Plastic Surgery in Dominican Republic

Posted 12 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 14, 2016 – U.S. health officials are warning about the dangers of "medical tourism" after at least 18 women from the East Coast became infected with a disfiguring bacteria following plastic surgery procedures they had in the Dominican Republic. The infections, caused by a type of germ called mycobacteria, can be difficult to treat. At least several of the women had to be hospitalized, undergo surgery to treat the infection and take antibiotics for months, according to the report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. One expert said the effects can be devastating. "It's a very mutilating infection. They're going for cosmetic surgery, and they will be scarred. It's a terrible scenario for people to go down there, get surgery and come back worse than they imagined they could be," said Dr. Charles Daley. He is a Denver infectious disease physician whose ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Facial Wrinkles, Facial Lipoatrophy, Orbicularis Oculi, Lip Augmentation

Common Surgeries Raise Risk for Opioid Dependence: Study

Posted 14 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 11, 2016 – After knee surgery and other common operations, patients have an elevated risk of growing dependent on opioid painkillers, a new study finds. These prescription painkillers include hydrocodone (Vycodin, Lortab), oxycodone (OxyContin) and fentanyl, the narcotic implicated in the April 21 death of rock legend Prince. "For a lot of surgeries there is a higher chance of getting hooked on painkillers," said study author Dr. Eric Sun, an instructor at Stanford University School of Medicine, in Palo Alto, Calif. But Sun cautioned that the finding isn't a reason to avoid surgery. "The message isn't that you shouldn't have surgery," said Sun. "Rather, there are things that anesthesiologists can do to reduce the risk by finding other ways of controlling the pain and using replacements for opioids when possible." For the study, the researchers examined medical claims of ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Surgery, Oxycodone, Methadone, Hydrocodone, Percocet, Tramadol, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Opana, Subutex, Dilaudid, Ultram, Opana ER

Repaired ACL More Likely to Tear Again in Young Women

Posted 17 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 7, 2016 – Female athletes younger than 25 have the highest risk for a repeat tear of the knee's anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) after surgery to repair it, a new study says. The study included just over 500 male and female athletes who underwent ACL reconstruction with a hamstring graft and were followed for two years. Their average age was 27. They were allowed to return to sports six to 12 months after surgery if they were pain-free, had equal quadriceps/hamstring strength, and had finished a rehabilitation program. "Our research noted that female patients under the age of 25 with a [smaller] graft size of less than 8 millimeters have an increased chance of re-tearing their ACL following reconstruction," study lead author Dr. Duong Nguyen said in an American Orthopaedic Society of Sports Medicine news release. He is an orthopedic surgeon and adjunct clinical professor ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery, Surgical Prophylaxis

Do Too Many Lung Cancer Patients Miss Out on Surgery?

Posted 21 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 21, 2016 – Many patients with advanced lung cancer might live longer if treated surgically, but few go that route, new research indicates. A study of U.S. patients with late-stage non-small cell lung cancer found only 11 percent underwent surgery – and 27 percent got no treatment at all. Yet surgery, either alone or with other treatments, prolonged survival by as much as 41 months, researchers said. "We were surprised by the findings, but they have to be considered with caution," said study lead author Dr. Elizabeth David, an assistant professor of surgery at the University of California, Davis Medical Center, in Sacramento. "Surgery is not appropriate for every patient with stage 3 or 4 lung cancer," she noted. "We just need to make sure that appropriate patients are evaluated by surgeons, and we are working on ways to make that easier." At stages 3 and 4, the cancer ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer, History - Radiation Therapy, Bronchogenic Carcinoma

Extensive Surgery Best for an Aggressive Brain Cancer: Study

Posted 16 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 16, 2016 – When it comes to battling a particularly aggressive form of brain tumor, more extensive surgeries may be best to boost patient survival, researchers have concluded. The brain cancer – called glioblastoma multiforme – is often treated with surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy. However, the ideal combination of treatments for this cancer isn't clear. One expert said glioblastoma surgeries are especially complicated. "Since this tumor infiltrates normal brain and is often indistinguishable from it, it is difficult to know where the tumor ends and normal brain begins," explained Dr. Raj Narayan, a neurosurgeon who reviewed the new study findings. "Therefore, an aggressive effort to remove 'all' of the tumor runs the risk of causing increased neurological deficits such as paralysis and loss of speech," said Narayan, who is chair of neurosurgery at North ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Brain Tumor, Glioblastoma Multiforme

Minimally Invasive Hip Surgery Isn't Always the Right Choice

Posted 4 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 3, 2016 – Minimally invasive hip surgery may not always be the best option to relieve serious, ongoing hip pain, a new study suggests. Researchers found that more than one-third of people in their 60s who had the minimally invasive procedure – known as hip arthroscopy – ended up needing a hip replacement within two years. Hip arthroscopy relies on small incisions around the hip to allow for the insertion of a tiny camera, as well as surgical tools, according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). Hip arthroscopy can be used to treat a number of painful conditions, the AAOS says. For example, the procedure can be used to repair torn cartilage or remove extra bone that occurs in the very earliest stages of osteoarthritis, explained Dr. Stuart Weinstein. "Hip arthroscopy has been an amazing development and has helped many patients with hip disorders," said ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Hip Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery

1 in 5 Ovarian Cancer Patients Doesn't Get Life-Extending Surgery: Study

Posted 4 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 3, 2016 – Surgery may significantly extend ovarian cancer patients' lives, but one in five women does not have the procedure, a new study finds. "Though surgery isn't right for every patient, we suspect that some women do not receive beneficial surgical treatment because they have poor access to specialty care," said lead researcher Dr. David Shalowitz. He is a fellow in gynecologic oncology at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. "While some women may benefit more from non-surgical treatment, the results of our study showed that on average, women who received surgery lived more than four years, compared to less than one year for those who received only non-surgical treatment," he said in a university news release. The researchers analyzed data from more than 210,000 women diagnosed with ovarian cancer in the United States ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Ovarian Cancer, Surgical Prophylaxis, Genitourinary Surgical and Other Conditions

Weight-Loss Surgery May Boost Survival

Posted 3 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 2, 2016 – Weight-loss surgery might significantly lower obese people's risk of premature death, a new study finds. About five years after surgery, the death rate was just over 1 percent for those who had weight-loss surgery and 4 percent among those in the non-surgery group, researchers said. For the study, the researchers – led by Christina Persson from the University of Gothenburg in Sweden – reviewed data from almost 49,000 obese people in Sweden. They were between 18 and 74 years old. More than 22,500 people had weight-loss surgery between 2000 and 2011. The study compared them with about 26,000 people who did not have the surgery. Most of those in the surgery group had the procedure known as gastric bypass (93 percent). According to the study, the overall death rate decreased by 57 percent in the surgery group, compared to the non-surgery group. This figure held ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Obesity, Weight Loss

Refugees Aren't Getting Needed Surgeries

Posted 3 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 2, 2016 – Millions of refugees aren't getting the surgery they need, researchers report. "When planning to take care of refugees, much thought is put into how to house and feed and clothe people who are far from home for circumstances often beyond their control. But surgery is a basic need and nobody talks about this," said Dr. Adam Kushner, leader of a new study conducted at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore. An analysis of data from the United Nations and other sources estimates that the roughly 60 million refugees worldwide may need at least 2.8 million surgeries a year. But their circumstances make it difficult to receive that type of medical care, the researchers added. The types of surgeries required range from broken bones and hernia repair to cesarean sections, cleft lips, gallbladder removal and burn care, the study found. The ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Knee Joint Replacement, Hip Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery, Hiatal Hernia, Inguinal Hernia, Surgical Prophylaxis, Cesarean Section, Cardiothoracic Surgery

Severe Obesity May Boost Infection Risk After Heart Surgery

Posted 1 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 1, 2016 – Severely obese people may have a higher risk of certain complications after heart bypass surgery than normal-weight patients, a new study suggests. The researchers found that severe obesity was linked to much higher odds of developing an infection soon after heart bypass surgery. And severely obese patients were also more likely to have longer hospital stays than normal-weight patients. For the study, the investigators reviewed data from more than 7,500 Canadians who had coronary artery bypass surgery between 2003 and 2014. This surgery redirects blood flow to the heart around clogged arteries. People with a body mass index (BMI) of 40 or more were considered severely obese. BMI is a rough estimate of a person's body fat based on height and weight. A BMI between 35 and 39.9 is considered severe obesity, while 30 to 34.9 is obesity. A normal BMI is 18.5 to ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Surgery, Obesity, Surgical Prophylaxis, Vascular Surgery, Cardiothoracic Surgery

Knee Replacement Patients May Be Able to Hit the Shower Sooner

Posted 27 May 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 26, 2016 – Knee surgery patients are usually instructed to wait two weeks after surgery to take a shower to reduce the risk of infection. But a small new study suggests this may not be necessary. Researchers found no differences in bacterial swabs from those who waited two weeks to shower compared with those allowed to shower after about two days. That's no doubt welcome news to the many patients who've struggled to find a way to bathe without getting their incision wet. The study, led by Dr. Harold Rees, an orthopaedic surgeon at Loyola University Medical Center in Maywood, Ill., followed 32 patients. Half were randomly assigned to shower after two weeks. The other half could shower as soon as their surgical dressing was removed – typically two days after surgery. None of the patients developed a post-operative infection, the study found. And, unsurprisingly, patients ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery, Deep Vein Thrombosis Prophylaxis after Knee Replacement Surgery

Fastballs a Fast Track to 'Tommy John Surgery'?

Posted 26 May 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 26, 2016 – A new study finds that throwing a lot of fastballs may increase a pitcher's risk of an elbow injury requiring "Tommy John surgery." "Our findings suggest that throwing a high percentage of fastballs rather than off-speed pitches puts more stress on the elbow," said study author Dr. Robert Keller. "This leads to elbow fatigue, overuse and, subsequently, injury," Keller, chief resident in the department of orthopedic surgery at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, said in a hospital news release. Tommy John surgery is named after the big league pitcher who was the first to undergo the operation more than 40 years ago. Its medical name is ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) reconstruction. The procedure involves replacing the UCL in the medial elbow with a tendon from the same arm or the hamstring area. The researchers found that 83 Major League Baseball pitchers who ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery, Epicondylitis - Tennis Elbow, Surgical Prophylaxis

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Surgical Prophylaxis, Ophthalmic Surgery, Head & Neck Surgery, Neurosurgery, Orthopedic Surgery, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Gastrointestinal Surgery, Postoperative Albumin Loss, Vascular Surgery, Genitourinary Surgical and Other Conditions, Biliary Tract Surgery, Extracorporeal Perfusion