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Surgery News

Old Age Alone Not to Blame for Surgical Complications

Posted 7 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 12, 2018 – Various factors can increase a senior's chances of experiencing complications after surgery, but age apparently isn't one of them. A review of 44 studies that included more than 12,000 people aged 60 and older found that frailty, mental impairment, depressive symptoms and smoking increased the risk for complications after surgery. Age did not. The researchers, from St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto, also found no association between the risk for complications and a patient's American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) status, which assesses a patient's physical health before surgery. "The fact that age and ASA status were not risk factors for postoperative complications is somewhat surprising because these are the factors a clinician would typically look at when assessing a patient's risk of developing complications after surgery," study author Dr. Jennifer Watt ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Surgery, Major Depressive Disorder, Smoking, Dysthymia, Surgical Prophylaxis

Surgery or Antibiotics for Appendicitis? Here's What Patients Chose

Posted 9 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 10, 2018 – Even though appendicitis often resolves with the use of antibiotics, the overwhelming majority of Americans would opt for surgery instead, a new survey finds. Only about one in every 10 adults surveyed in the new study said they'd use antibiotics to ease an inflamed appendix, according to a team led by surgeon Dr. Marc Basson, of the University of North Dakota School of Medicine. The study authors noted that's in line with most surgeons' assumptions about appendicitis cases: That people tend to want a quick removal of the vestigial organ. But surgery – even a less invasive laparoscopic procedure – comes with risks, so Basson's team believes it's important to at least discuss the antibiotics option with patients. Patients "deserve the chance to choose antibiotics alone if they [have] developed acute, uncomplicated appendicitis," the researchers wrote in the ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Appendicitis, Surgical Prophylaxis, Gastrointestinal Surgery

Is Surgery Riskier for Black Children?

Posted 9 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 10, 2018 – Black children are more than twice as likely as white kids to die from surgery complications in the United States, a new study suggests. Researchers found that black kids more often had risk factors that raised their odds of dying within 30 days of surgery. They were more likely, for example, to need blood transfusions or to be placed on ventilators to help them breathe. But even when compared to white children with the same risk factors, black kids were relatively more likely to die. It's not clear why, the study authors said. "We definitely need further investigation to find out why these risk factors are more prevalent, and more strongly associated with risk of death, among black children," said lead researcher Oguz Akbilgic, of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center. The good news: The average risk of a child dying after surgery was still very ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery, Surgical Prophylaxis, Vascular Surgery, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Gastrointestinal Surgery

FDA Medwatch Alert: Compounded Sterile Products by PharMEDium Services: Recall - Lack of Sterility Assurance

Posted 16 days ago by Drugs.com

ISSUE: PharMEDium Services is voluntarily recalling certain lots of drug products to the hospital/user level due to a lack of assurance of sterility. Administration of a drug product intended to be sterile that is not sterile could result in serious infections that may be life-threatening. See the press release for a listing of affected products. BACKGROUND: PharMEDium conducted a retrospective review of all commercially distributed product lots compounded in the Memphis location currently within their labeled expiration date in response to an FDA request regarding microbial control program during recent inspection to provide verification of acceptable microbiological testing results of the ISO5 environment, personnel glove sampling results, media fill results, sterility testing results, and endotoxin results. The review indicated that a total of 55 lots of different products ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery

Checking Prices for Medical Procedures Online? Good Luck

Posted 5 Dec 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 5, 2017 – The cards seem to be stacked against anyone who'd like to use the internet to become a smarter health care consumer. A new study has found that people searching online to figure out how much they'll pay for a medical procedure will come away disappointed most of the time, said lead researcher Allison Kratka. She's a medical student at Duke University in Durham, N.C. "Fewer than 1 in 5 websites actually yielded a local price estimate that was relevant to the health care procedure in question," Kratka said. To help halt the rising cost of health care, Kratka said, patients are being encouraged to learn more about the prices of medical procedures they need. However, it's unclear whether the resources exist to help people gain a real understanding of what a procedure costs and what they would have to pay out-of-pocket, she said. To see whether the internet is of any ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Knee Joint Replacement, Hip Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery

Your Doc Is Away? Substitute Doctors a Safe Option, Study Finds

Posted 5 Dec 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 5, 2017 – When the regular hospital doctor is out, the white-coated physician treating you may very well be a "temp." The good news: Patients cared for by substitute doctors don't have a higher risk of death. But they do tend to have longer stays and higher costs, a new study finds. "Our findings so far are reassuring," said study senior author Dr. Anupam Jena, an associate professor of health care policy at Harvard Medical School. Traditionally, when a regular staff doctor was away or sick, hospitals relied on one of the doctor's colleagues to pitch in. Today, hospitals in the United States increasingly turn to for-hire temporary physicians from anywhere in the country. But Jena said there has been little research into how that affects patient care. In this study, investigators analyzed 1.8 million Medicare hospital admissions between 2009 and 2014. Nearly 40,000 ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

Even Non-Heart Surgery May Harm Your Heart

Posted 4 Dec 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Dec. 4, 2017 – Older adults commonly suffer damage to heart cells during various types of surgery – even non-heart-related surgeries – and it can significantly raise their risk of dying from the procedure, a new study finds. The research looked at a phenomenon called perioperative myocardial injury, or PMI. It refers to subtler heart damage that can happen during or soon after any type of surgery. Older patients and those who already have heart disease are at increased risk. However, the condition is easily missed because most of the affected patients have no chest pain or other symptoms, according to Dr. Christian Puelacher, the first author on the new study. He's a clinical researcher at Cardiovascular Research Institute Basel in Switzerland. Puelacher's team found that PMI may happen more often than doctors have typically thought: Of more than 2,000 high-risk patients they ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Diagnosis and Investigation

Patients More Prone to Complain About Younger Doctors

Posted 30 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 30, 2017 – Patients apparently are more likely to complain about younger doctors. Case in point: ophthalmologists. A new study of more than 1,300 ophthalmologists at Vanderbilt University in Nashville found that as the age of these doctors increased, patient complaints decreased. "In a time where increasing attention is being paid to aging physicians and mandatory screening for cognitive impairment, the patient's voice can be a powerful tool for understanding performance," said the study's lead researcher, Dr. William Cooper. He's a professor of pediatrics and health policy at Vanderbilt's School of Medicine. "Therefore, if a physician suddenly has a change and increase in the frequency of patient complaints against a backdrop of colleagues who typically have fewer complaints, then that person may warrant further evaluation," Cooper said. The study couldn't pinpoint why ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery, Ophthalmic Surgery

Doctors Prescribing Too Many Opioids After Nose Jobs

Posted 9 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 9, 2017 – Could some patients recovering from a nose job get a problem they didn't bargain for? After these operations, patients are often sent home with more opioid pain pills than they need, increasing the risk for misuse, researchers say. About 218,000 cosmetic nose surgeries were performed in the United States in 2015. In fact, "rhinoplasty" is one of the most common plastic surgery procedures in the United States, which is experiencing an opioid epidemic. The new study included 62 patients at two private practices and an academic health center who underwent rhinoplasty. The patients were prescribed the opioid painkiller Vicodin (hydrocodone/acetaminophen) for pain relief after surgery. On average, patients used nine of the 20 to 30 tablets they were prescribed. Seventy-four percent used 15 or fewer tablets, and only three patients needed refills. The number of ... Read more

Related support groups: Suboxone, Oxycodone, Surgery, Tramadol, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Opana, Subutex, Dilaudid, Opana ER, MS Contin, Roxicodone

Surgical Residents Prime Candidates for Stress, Depression, Alcohol Abuse

Posted 8 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8, 2017 – Burnout is common among medical residents training to be surgeons, putting them at increased risk for alcohol abuse, anxiety, depression and suicidal thoughts, a new study suggests. But a stress-countering technique called mindfulness may help them, the study authors added. "Surgical trainees live in a culture where high stress is normative, but excessive stress must be addressed," said study lead author Dr. Carter Lebares, an assistant professor in the department of surgery at the University of California, San Francisco. "While surgical trainees have willingly chosen a high-stress career, the existence of overwhelming stress is evidenced by the strong association between stress and distress symptoms like depression, suicidal thoughts and high anxiety," Lebares added in a university news release. His team examined the responses of 566 surgical residents in the ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Surgery, Alcohol Dependence, Alcoholism, Acute Alcohol Intoxication

Opioids Not the Only Answer for Pain Relief in the ER

Posted 7 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 7, 2017 – As the opioid epidemic continues to sweep across the United States, a new study suggests that a combination of Motrin and Tylenol may work as well as narcotic painkillers for ER patients who suffer sprains or fractures. "Although this study focused on treatment while in the emergency department, if we can successfully treat acute extremity pain with a non-opioid combination painkiller in there, then we might be able to send these patients home without an opioid prescription," said lead researcher Dr. Andrew Chang. He is a professor of emergency medicine at Albany Medical Center, in Albany, N.Y. "We know that some patients who are given an opioid prescription will become addicted, so if we can decrease the number of people being sent home with an opioid prescription, then we can prevent people from becoming addicted in the first place," Chang suggested. Ibuprofen ... Read more

Related support groups: Suboxone, Oxycodone, Surgery, Tramadol, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Opiate Dependence, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Tylenol, Ibuprofen, Opana, Subutex, Dilaudid

Gun Injuries Getting More Severe, Experts Say

Posted 7 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 6, 2017 – U.S. hospitals have been tackling increasingly serious injuries in the gunshot victims they treat, a 20-year review reports. "The severity of hospitalized firearm injuries [has] increased significantly," said researcher Bindu Kalesan, amounting to what she described as "a significantly elevated cumulative probability of death and disability from firearm injury." That proved to be the case among victims of the Oct. 1 Las Vegas shooting, which left at least 58 people dead and about 500 injured, many severely. And at least 26 people were killed and 20 wounded Sunday when a gunman opened fire in a rural Texas church. The new research was to be discussed Monday in Atlanta at the annual meeting of the American Public Health Association (APHA). The research was based on an analysis of firearm injury trends between 1993 and 2013 involving hospitals in 44 states, ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Agitation, Agitated State, Vascular Surgery

People Tend to Overestimate Pain From Surgery

Posted 4 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 3, 2017 – Many patients overestimate the amount of pain they'll experience after surgery, resulting in needless anxiety, a new study reports. "We believe providers need to do a better job of counseling patients on realistic pain expectations," said study co-author Dr. Jaime Baratta, director of regional anesthesia at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia. The research included 223 patients. Their average age was 61. All had orthopedic, neurological or general surgery. Of these, 96 received some form of regional anesthesia (spinal, epidural or peripheral nerve block). The remaining 127 patients received only general anesthesia. Before their surgery, the patients estimated what level of postoperative pain they expected on a 0-10 scale (10 being the most painful). After surgery, they were asked about their level of pain in the post-anesthesia care unit one hour ... Read more

Related support groups: Suboxone, Oxycodone, Surgery, Tramadol, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Opana, Subutex, Dilaudid, Opana ER, MS Contin, Roxicodone

Is Successful Heart Surgery All in the Timing?

Posted 27 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 26, 2017 – Planning to have open heart surgery anytime soon? You might want to ask your cardiologist to book an afternoon slot in the OR. New research shows that heart operations performed in the afternoon produced better outcomes than those done in the morning. Because afternoon heart surgery syncs with the body's circadian clock (the internal body clock that controls when people sleep, eat and wake up), it reduces the risk of heart damage, the French researchers said. "Currently, there are few other surgical options to reduce the risk of post-surgery heart damage, meaning new techniques to protect patients are needed," said study author Dr. David Montaigne, a professor at the University of Lille. In one part of the study, his team tracked the medical records of nearly 600 people who had heart valve replacement surgery for 500 days, to identify any major cardiac events ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Cardiothoracic Surgery

A Boy, Two Magnets -- and a Trip to the ER

Posted 25 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 25, 2017 – Proving yet again that kids will try almost anything when you're not watching, one European 11-year-old wedged two small magnetized disks up his nostrils – causing serious medical issues, his doctors report. The unnamed child from Cyprus was brought to a hospital six hours later with a nosebleed and "severe pain," the physicians wrote in the Oct. 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. "Examination of the nasal cavity showed mucus and crusted blood," said Drs. Kadir Kazikdas and Mehmet Dirik, of Near East University in Nicosia. What's worse, the two magnets were attracted to each other across the nasal cavity. That meant they were compressing tissue which in time could lead to tissue death and even perforation of the septum. The magnets were so powerfully attracted that attempts by ER doctors to remove them didn't work. So the boy "was taken to the ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Nasal Congestion, Poisoning

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Surgical Prophylaxis, Ophthalmic Surgery, Head & Neck Surgery, Neurosurgery, Orthopedic Surgery, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Gastrointestinal Surgery, Vascular Surgery, Postoperative Albumin Loss, Biliary Tract Surgery, Genitourinary Surgical and Other Conditions, Extracorporeal Perfusion