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Surgery News

Doctors Prescribing Too Many Opioids After Nose Jobs

Posted 8 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 9, 2017 – Could some patients recovering from a nose job get a problem they didn't bargain for? After these operations, patients are often sent home with more opioid pain pills than they need, increasing the risk for misuse, researchers say. About 218,000 cosmetic nose surgeries were performed in the United States in 2015. In fact, "rhinoplasty" is one of the most common plastic surgery procedures in the United States, which is experiencing an opioid epidemic. The new study included 62 patients at two private practices and an academic health center who underwent rhinoplasty. The patients were prescribed the opioid painkiller Vicodin (hydrocodone/acetaminophen) for pain relief after surgery. On average, patients used nine of the 20 to 30 tablets they were prescribed. Seventy-four percent used 15 or fewer tablets, and only three patients needed refills. The number of ... Read more

Related support groups: Suboxone, Oxycodone, Surgery, Tramadol, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Opana, Subutex, Dilaudid, Opana ER, MS Contin, Roxicodone

Surgical Residents Prime Candidates for Stress, Depression, Alcohol Abuse

Posted 9 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8, 2017 – Burnout is common among medical residents training to be surgeons, putting them at increased risk for alcohol abuse, anxiety, depression and suicidal thoughts, a new study suggests. But a stress-countering technique called mindfulness may help them, the study authors added. "Surgical trainees live in a culture where high stress is normative, but excessive stress must be addressed," said study lead author Dr. Carter Lebares, an assistant professor in the department of surgery at the University of California, San Francisco. "While surgical trainees have willingly chosen a high-stress career, the existence of overwhelming stress is evidenced by the strong association between stress and distress symptoms like depression, suicidal thoughts and high anxiety," Lebares added in a university news release. His team examined the responses of 566 surgical residents in the ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Surgery, Alcohol Dependence, Alcoholism, Acute Alcohol Intoxication

Opioids Not the Only Answer for Pain Relief in the ER

Posted 10 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 7, 2017 – As the opioid epidemic continues to sweep across the United States, a new study suggests that a combination of Motrin and Tylenol may work as well as narcotic painkillers for ER patients who suffer sprains or fractures. "Although this study focused on treatment while in the emergency department, if we can successfully treat acute extremity pain with a non-opioid combination painkiller in there, then we might be able to send these patients home without an opioid prescription," said lead researcher Dr. Andrew Chang. He is a professor of emergency medicine at Albany Medical Center, in Albany, N.Y. "We know that some patients who are given an opioid prescription will become addicted, so if we can decrease the number of people being sent home with an opioid prescription, then we can prevent people from becoming addicted in the first place," Chang suggested. Ibuprofen ... Read more

Related support groups: Suboxone, Oxycodone, Surgery, Tramadol, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Opiate Dependence, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Tylenol, Ibuprofen, Opana, Subutex, Dilaudid

Gun Injuries Getting More Severe, Experts Say

Posted 11 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 6, 2017 – U.S. hospitals have been tackling increasingly serious injuries in the gunshot victims they treat, a 20-year review reports. "The severity of hospitalized firearm injuries [has] increased significantly," said researcher Bindu Kalesan, amounting to what she described as "a significantly elevated cumulative probability of death and disability from firearm injury." That proved to be the case among victims of the Oct. 1 Las Vegas shooting, which left at least 58 people dead and about 500 injured, many severely. And at least 26 people were killed and 20 wounded Sunday when a gunman opened fire in a rural Texas church. The new research was to be discussed Monday in Atlanta at the annual meeting of the American Public Health Association (APHA). The research was based on an analysis of firearm injury trends between 1993 and 2013 involving hospitals in 44 states, ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Agitation, Agitated State, Vascular Surgery

People Tend to Overestimate Pain From Surgery

Posted 14 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 3, 2017 – Many patients overestimate the amount of pain they'll experience after surgery, resulting in needless anxiety, a new study reports. "We believe providers need to do a better job of counseling patients on realistic pain expectations," said study co-author Dr. Jaime Baratta, director of regional anesthesia at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia. The research included 223 patients. Their average age was 61. All had orthopedic, neurological or general surgery. Of these, 96 received some form of regional anesthesia (spinal, epidural or peripheral nerve block). The remaining 127 patients received only general anesthesia. Before their surgery, the patients estimated what level of postoperative pain they expected on a 0-10 scale (10 being the most painful). After surgery, they were asked about their level of pain in the post-anesthesia care unit one hour ... Read more

Related support groups: Suboxone, Oxycodone, Surgery, Tramadol, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Opana, Subutex, Dilaudid, Opana ER, MS Contin, Roxicodone

Is Successful Heart Surgery All in the Timing?

Posted 27 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 26, 2017 – Planning to have open heart surgery anytime soon? You might want to ask your cardiologist to book an afternoon slot in the OR. New research shows that heart operations performed in the afternoon produced better outcomes than those done in the morning. Because afternoon heart surgery syncs with the body's circadian clock (the internal body clock that controls when people sleep, eat and wake up), it reduces the risk of heart damage, the French researchers said. "Currently, there are few other surgical options to reduce the risk of post-surgery heart damage, meaning new techniques to protect patients are needed," said study author Dr. David Montaigne, a professor at the University of Lille. In one part of the study, his team tracked the medical records of nearly 600 people who had heart valve replacement surgery for 500 days, to identify any major cardiac events ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Cardiothoracic Surgery

A Boy, Two Magnets -- and a Trip to the ER

Posted 25 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 25, 2017 – Proving yet again that kids will try almost anything when you're not watching, one European 11-year-old wedged two small magnetized disks up his nostrils – causing serious medical issues, his doctors report. The unnamed child from Cyprus was brought to a hospital six hours later with a nosebleed and "severe pain," the physicians wrote in the Oct. 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. "Examination of the nasal cavity showed mucus and crusted blood," said Drs. Kadir Kazikdas and Mehmet Dirik, of Near East University in Nicosia. What's worse, the two magnets were attracted to each other across the nasal cavity. That meant they were compressing tissue which in time could lead to tissue death and even perforation of the septum. The magnets were so powerfully attracted that attempts by ER doctors to remove them didn't work. So the boy "was taken to the ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Nasal Congestion, Poisoning

Does Time of Neurosurgery Matter?

Posted 24 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 24, 2017 – Patients who have neurosurgery overnight are more likely to have complications than those whose operations occur during the day, a new study finds. Risk of complications was 50 percent higher when surgeries began between 9 p.m. and 7 a.m., said University of Michigan researchers. They reviewed more than 15,800 neurosurgical procedures and their outcomes. When accounting for the length of the surgery, the research team found the odds of a complication more than doubled. Patients in the study underwent neurosurgery in the University of Michigan Health System between 2007 and 2014. There were 785 complications, including mild medication reactions, infections, heart attack and death. Complications became more common after hours, but not necessarily more severe except in the case of emergency surgeries, the researchers said. They noted that as it got later in the ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Surgery, Neurosurgery

Easy Fix for Post-Op Shivers?

Posted 23 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, Oct. 21, 2017 – Giving patients acetaminophen during surgery may reduce their risk of shivering when they wake up, according to a small study. Up to half of patients have shivers and chills when they regain consciousness after surgery. The cause is unknown, but may be linked to the body cooling down, according to the study authors. "Postoperative shivering is a frequent complication in patients recovering from general anesthesia. It causes significant pain and discomfort," said lead researcher Dr. Takahiro Tadokoro. He's a physician anesthesiologist at the University of the Ryukyus in Okinawa, Japan. "Postoperative shivering can also put a strain on the cardiovascular system. Therefore, we need to prevent it, especially in patients with cardiopulmonary risk," Tadokoro added in a news release from the American Society of Anesthesiologists. The study included 37 gynecologic ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Percocet, Vicodin, Norco, Lortab, Tylenol, Acetaminophen, Paracetamol, Fioricet, Excedrin, Endocet, Tylenol PM, Darvocet-N 100, Acetaminophen/Hydrocodone, Percocet 10/325, Tylenol with Codeine, Daytime, Tylenol with Codeine 3, DayQuil, Acetaminophen/Oxycodone

Textured Breast Implants Linked to Rare Cancer

Posted 20 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 20, 2017 – A particular breast implant may be associated with a rare type of cancer, researchers report. Breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (BIA-ALCL) is estimated to affect 1 in 30,000 women each year, but researchers said it may actually be more common. "We're seeing that this cancer is likely very underreported, and as more information on this type of cancer comes to light, the number of cases is likely to increase in the coming years," said Dr. Dino Ravnic. He is an assistant professor of surgery at Penn State College of Medicine. Penn State investigators reviewed 115 research reports in which 95 patients were evaluated to learn more about risk, development and treatment of BIA-ALCL. Nearly all cases were associated with textured breast implants, which have a slightly rough surface to keep them in the correct position. "We're still exploring the ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Breast Cancer, Lymphoma, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Breast Cancer, Prevention

People Deemed Better Looking, Better Off After a Nose Job

Posted 19 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 19, 2017 – Is a "nose job" worth it? And if so, how much? A new study suggests that casual observers may think patients who undergo such procedures are more attractive, more successful and healthier. "While we are not suggesting that [a nose job] is the only way to improve one's appearance, improving our attractiveness and health as compared to others conveys a competitive advantage," said study co-author and plastic surgeon Dr. Lisa Ishii. More than 220,000 "nose reshaping" procedures – known as rhinoplasty – were performed in the United States in 2016, up 2 percent from the previous year, according to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. The procedures are nearly as common as liposuction. The new study examines how "casual observers" perceive people after they've had a nose job, said Ishii, a plastic surgeon and associate professor at Johns Hopkins School of ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Nasal Congestion, Facial Wrinkles, Head & Neck Surgery

Weight-Loss Surgery May Curb Risk for Certain Cancers

Posted 17 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 17, 2017 – Weight-loss surgery could help some severely obese people reduce their risk for cancer by at least 33 percent, a new study suggests. The researchers examined medical data compiled by health insurance and health care delivery systems in the western United States, including Southern California, Northern California, Oregon, Washington and Colorado. The analysis included data on nearly 22,200 people who had weight-loss surgery between 2005 and 2012, and over 66,400 people who didn't have the surgery. More than 80 percent of the study participants were women. Within 3.5 years after their surgery, about 2,500 people had developed cancer, the findings showed. The study found that patients who'd had weight-loss surgery, compared with those who had not had the surgery, were one-third less likely to have developed cancer, particularly the types of cancer related to ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Obesity, Cancer, Weight Loss, Breast Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Pancreatic Cancer, Gastric Bypass Surgery, Endometrial Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prevention

With Skin Cancer Surgery, Insurance Matters

Posted 16 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 16, 2017 – Surgery is the main treatment for melanoma – a dangerous form of skin cancer – but a patient's insurance could affect whether or not that cancer is quickly removed, new research suggests. After reviewing thousands of melanoma cases, researchers at the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center reported that patients with Medicaid were more likely to face delays in scheduling their surgery than those with private insurance. Medicaid is the federally funded health insurance program for poor and needy people. "The primary treatment for most melanoma is surgical excision, which can be curative," said study author Dr. Ade Adamson, a clinical instructor in the UNC School of Medicine's department of dermatology. "These delays in care are concerning, particularly if they disproportionately affect those who might be the most vulnerable, such as ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Melanoma - Metastatic, Surgical Prophylaxis, History - Skin Cancer

More Women Choose Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy

Posted 13 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 13, 2017 – Over five years, the proportion of U.S. breast cancer patients opting for breast reconstruction after mastectomy grew by about two-thirds, a new government report shows. An analysis of patient data shows breast reconstruction followed 40 percent of breast-removal surgeries in 2014 – up from less than one-quarter in 2009, according to the U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Among age groups, women aged 65 and older accounted for the largest increase in breast reconstructive surgery – 140 percent. "This type of information is essential for policymakers and health systems seeking to keep pace with important trends in clinical care," Gopal Khanna, agency director, said in an AHRQ news release. The overall increase during the study period was 65 percent, researchers said. While reconstruction procedures increased in all insurance groups, the ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Breast Cancer - Palliative

Are Women Surgeons Better Than Men?

Posted 11 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 10, 2017 – The gender of a surgeon appears to have little to do with the outcome of an operation. A Canadian study found that patients operated on by women had no more complications or problems after surgery than did patients whose surgeons were men. "Our findings have important implications for supporting sex equality and diversity in a traditionally male-dominated profession," the study authors wrote. The researchers, led by Dr. Raj Satkunasivam, a Houston Methodist Hospital surgeon previously at the University of Toronto, investigated whether gender plays a role in surgical skills and outcomes. The team analyzed the link between surgeons' gender and the results of 25 common surgical procedures over an eight-year span. The investigators compared the outcomes of over 104,000 procedures performed by 774 female surgeons with the outcomes of the same surgeries performed at ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery, Vascular Surgery, Cardiothoracic Surgery

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