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Surgery News

iPads Calm Surgery-Bound Kids as Well as Sedatives

Posted 2 hours 2 minutes ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 30, 2016 – Savvy parents probably already suspect it: iPads work as well as sedative drugs to calm anxious kids before surgery, a new study shows. Researchers assessed 112 children between 4 and 10 years old in France who had day surgery requiring general anesthesia. Twenty minutes before receiving the anesthesia, 54 kids were given the sedative midazolam and 58 were handed an iPad to distract them. Anxiety levels in both groups of kids and their parents were similar, but iPads conferred none of the side effects of sedatives, the researchers said. Also, they said the kids given iPads were easier to anesthetize. "Our study showed that child and parental anxiety before anesthesia are equally blunted by midazolam or use of the iPad," said Dr. Dominique Chassard and colleagues at Hopital Femme-Mere-Enfant in Bron, France. "However, the quality of induction of anesthesia, as ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Xanax, Surgery, Anxiety and Stress, Klonopin, Clonazepam, Ativan, Valium, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, Diazepam, Temazepam, Agitation, Librium, Restoril, Xanax XR, Oxazepam, Halcion, Serax, Triazolam

Study Bolsters Role of Angioplasty, Stents in Heart-Attack Survival

Posted 2 hours 3 minutes ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 30, 2016 – Patients who suffer a heart attack live longer now than they did before, and invasive procedures such as angioplasty, stents and bypass get a lot of the credit, a new study suggests. While medicines and healthy lifestyle remain important, "it was the increased and more widespread use of this invasive coronary strategy that explain the changes/improvements in survival after heart attack" between 2003 and 2013, said study author Dr. Chris P. Gale. He is associate professor and consultant cardiologist at the University of Leeds in England. Gale's team noted there's been a steady decline in the rate at which people die in the months after a heart attack. But what's driving that good news? To find out, Gale worked with Leeds co-author Dr. Marlous Hall and others to track information from a 2003-2013 database on nearly 400,000 heart attack patients living in England ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome, Cardiothoracic Surgery

Could Weight-Loss Surgery Boost Odds of Preemie Birth?

Posted 5 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 24, 2016 – Mothers-to-be who've had weight-loss surgery may have increased odds for premature delivery, researchers report. "Women and their doctors should be aware of this risk increase, and women with previous bariatric [weight-loss] surgery should be carefully monitored during pregnancy," said Dr. Olof Stephansson, lead researcher on a new study from Sweden. The current findings contradict results from a smaller study by the same team. However, the earlier research involved fewer than 600 women who had undergone weight-loss surgery. This time, the researchers assessed nearly 2,000 births after the surgery. The investigators found that 8.4 percent were preterm – before 37 weeks' gestation. That compared with 6.8 percent among nearly 6,600 women of similar size who didn't have the weight-loss procedure. "We cannot say what is causing this risk increase, but we have ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Obesity, Weight Loss, Gastric Bypass Surgery, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy

Use of Cancer-Linked Fibroid Device Declines After FDA Warning

Posted 7 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 23, 2016 – The use of power morcellators – cutting tools used in minimally invasive gynecological procedures – has dropped significantly for hysterectomies since the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned against their use two years ago, a new study finds. Power morcellators have small blades that rotate rapidly. When used in minimally invasive hysterectomies or for the removal of noncancerous growths on the uterus known as fibroids, they slice the tissue into smaller pieces that are removed through a small opening in the abdomen. But tiny pieces of tissue can also spread to other areas of the body. And, sometimes, undetected cancers can be cut up with the healthy tissue. If that cancerous tissue isn't completely removed, those cells can cause cancer elsewhere. That's what prompted the FDA to issue its 2014 warning, the researchers explained. The new study looked only ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Cancer, Hysterectomy, Ovarian Cancer, Uterine Leiomyomata / Fibroids, Urinary Tract Cancer, Genitourinary Surgical and Other Conditions

Knee Surgery Rarer, but Problems More Likely, for Minority Patients

Posted 12 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 18, 2016 – Minority patients in the United States are less likely to get knee replacement surgery, but more likely to have complications when they do, a new study finds. Knee replacement can be used to treat patients who have severe pain, stiffness and reduced knee function, often due to arthritis or injury. More than 600,000 knee replacements are done in the United States each year. "Even after adjusting for certain patient demographics, socioeconomic status, and health care system characteristics, significant racial disparities in [total knee replacement] utilization and outcomes exist," corresponding study author Yan Ma said. Ma is an associate professor of epidemiology and biostatistics at the Milken Institute School of Public Health at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. Ma and his colleagues analyzed federal data on more than 547,000 total knee ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery

Injuries at Indoor Trampoline Parks Jump

Posted 14 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 16, 2016 – A wave of injuries at indoor trampoline parks has prompted a call for design and safety standards. In a small study, Australian researchers described injuries occurring at the parks as "an emerging public health concern." They reported that over six months, one Australian trauma center treated dozens of kids who were hurt at indoor trampoline parks. Between July 2014 and January 2015, its emergency room treated 40 children for trampoline park injuries. Their average age was 10, and the youngest child was 1. Thirty-three injuries occurred on the trampoline and 18 resulted from a bad landing. Eight injuries happened when several kids of different sizes used a trampoline at the same time. About half of the children were hurt while jumping, and five were injured while trying somersaults or flips. Six kids were hurt when they landed awkwardly on part of the ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Fracture, bone, Compression Fracture of Vertebral Column, Prevention of Fractures

New Guidelines Set Safe Surgery Margins for Some Breast Cancers

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 12, 2016 – New surgery guidelines for certain breast cancer patients could reduce both unnecessary surgeries and recurrence rates, three U.S. cancer groups say. The guideline is for treatment of women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) who undergo breast-conserving surgery with whole breast radiation. DCIS is an early stage cancer. "The use of a 2-millimeter margin as the standard for an adequate margin in DCIS treated with whole breast radiation therapy is associated with low rates of recurrence of cancer in the breast and has the potential to decrease re-excision rates, improve cosmetic outcome and decrease health care costs," according to the guideline from the Society of Surgical Oncology, the American Society for Radiation Oncology and the American Society of Clinical Oncology. "Margins more widely clear than 2 millimeters do not further reduce the rates of ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Breast Cancer - Palliative, Cardiothoracic Surgery

Surgery Effective Against Immune Disorder That Weakens Muscles

Posted 19 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 11, 2016 – Removing the thymus gland is an effective treatment for myasthenia gravis, an autoimmune disorder that causes life-threatening muscle weakness, researchers report. Since the 1940s, doctors have been surgically removing the thymus gland – a procedure called thymectomy – as a means of treating myasthenia gravis. But this has been done based on research indicating the gland might play a role in the development of the disease. "It has never been clearly shown to benefit patients beyond other medical therapies that have developed over time," said lead researcher Dr. Gil Wolfe. He's the chair of neurology for the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University at Buffalo in New York. "There has always been a question of how much favorable impact it actually provides," Wolfe said. Now, Wolfe and his colleagues have proven that thymectomy offers ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Myasthenia Gravis, Head & Neck Surgery

Insurance, Distance Often Prevent Breast Reconstruction After Cancer

Posted 2 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 2, 2016 – Insurance coverage and the distance to a doctor's office affect the likelihood that breast cancer patients will have reconstructive surgery after breast removal, a new study finds. Researchers analyzed data from nearly 5,400 women in North Carolina who were diagnosed with breast cancer between 2003 and 2006 and had breast removal (mastectomy) within six months of diagnosis. Twenty percent had breast reconstruction surgery within two years. Compared to patients with private insurance, those with Medicare coverage were 42 percent less likely to have breast reconstruction and those with Medicaid coverage were 76 percent less likely. Medicare and Medicaid are U.S. government health insurance programs. The University of North Carolina researchers also found that compared to women who lived within 10 miles of a plastic surgeon's office, those who lived 10 to 20 miles ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Breast Cancer - Palliative

Cancer Surgeons Advise Against Removal of Healthy Breast

Posted 31 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 29, 2016 – Only certain women with cancer in one breast should have their healthy breast removed in an attempt to prevent cancer, a leading group of breast surgeons maintains. The new position statement from the American Society of Breast Surgeons comes at a time when more breast cancer patients are asking doctors to remove the unaffected breast – a procedure known as contralateral prophylactic mastectomy. "Contralateral prophylactic mastectomy is a growing trend that has generated significant discussion among physicians, patients, breast cancer advocates and media," said position statement lead author Dr. Judy Boughey. She is professor of surgery at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. However, "it is important for patients to understand it does not improve their cancer outcome and for them to understand the pros, cons and alternatives to [contralateral prophylactic ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Surgical Prophylaxis, Breast Cancer - Palliative, Cardiothoracic Surgery

Face-Saving Devices: Seat Belts and Air Bags

Posted 22 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 22, 2016 – Seat belts and air bags significantly reduce the risk of facial fractures in car crashes, a new study finds. "Based on our analysis, we found that use of an air bag alone reduced the likelihood of a facial fracture by 18 percent while use of a seat belt alone decreased likelihood by 43 percent," said study co-leader Dr. Scott Chaiet, a head and neck surgeon at the University of Wisconsin when the study was conducted. "Use of both decreased the chances of facial fractures in a crash by 53 percent," he added in a university news release. Researchers analyzed 2007-12 data from more than 518,000 people in the United States who required treatment at a trauma center after a motor vehicle collision. More than 56,000 (nearly 11 percent) suffered facial fractures – nasal and mid-face fractures most often. Those most likely to suffer facial fractures were younger males ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Fracture, bone, Compression Fracture of Vertebral Column, Prevention of Fractures

Is Surgery Always Needed for Meniscal Tears of the Knee?

Posted 21 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 20, 2016 – A meniscal tear is a common and disabling knee injury affecting many Americans at some point in their lives. Now, new research suggests that in many cases, exercise may work just as well as surgery to heal the condition in middle-aged people. Meniscal tears occur when damage is done to the rubbery discs that cushion the knee joint. According to the European research team, about 2 million people worldwide undergo surgeries known as knee arthroscopy each year – although there's debate over how valuable these procedures are for meniscal tears. To help settle the matter, a team led by Nina Jullum Kise, an orthopedic surgeon at Martina Hansens Hospital in Sandvika, Norway, tracked outcomes for 140 patients. These patients averaged 50 years of age and had degenerative meniscal tears, largely without any signs of arthritis. Half of the patients performed two to ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery

Cornea Transplants Riskier for Women When They Come From Men?

Posted 15 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 15, 2016 – Women who undergo a cornea transplant may have a worse outcome if their donor is a man, a new study suggests. Subtle differences between men and women may increase the risk of failure or rejection for up to five years, the British researchers found. They noted that matching the gender of cornea donors and recipients could help improve transplant outcomes. The study involved more than 18,100 cornea transplant patients. More than 80 percent still had a working cornea after five years. Of those who had a failed transplant or tissue rejection, more were women who had received a cornea from a male donor. On average, 180 transplants fail for every 1,000 gender-matched procedures, compared with 220 failures among every 1,000 male-to-female transplants, according to the researchers. They said these results were especially evident among patients with Fuchs endothelial ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Eye Conditions, Cataract, Corneal Abrasion, Corneal Ulcer, Ophthalmic Surgery, Visual Defect/Disturbance, Corneal Refractive Surgery

CDC Warns of Dangers of Plastic Surgery in Dominican Republic

Posted 14 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 14, 2016 – U.S. health officials are warning about the dangers of "medical tourism" after at least 18 women from the East Coast became infected with a disfiguring bacteria following plastic surgery procedures they had in the Dominican Republic. The infections, caused by a type of germ called mycobacteria, can be difficult to treat. At least several of the women had to be hospitalized, undergo surgery to treat the infection and take antibiotics for months, according to the report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. One expert said the effects can be devastating. "It's a very mutilating infection. They're going for cosmetic surgery, and they will be scarred. It's a terrible scenario for people to go down there, get surgery and come back worse than they imagined they could be," said Dr. Charles Daley. He is a Denver infectious disease physician whose ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Facial Wrinkles, Facial Lipoatrophy, Orbicularis Oculi, Lip Augmentation

Common Surgeries Raise Risk for Opioid Dependence: Study

Posted 12 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 11, 2016 – After knee surgery and other common operations, patients have an elevated risk of growing dependent on opioid painkillers, a new study finds. These prescription painkillers include hydrocodone (Vycodin, Lortab), oxycodone (OxyContin) and fentanyl, the narcotic implicated in the April 21 death of rock legend Prince. "For a lot of surgeries there is a higher chance of getting hooked on painkillers," said study author Dr. Eric Sun, an instructor at Stanford University School of Medicine, in Palo Alto, Calif. But Sun cautioned that the finding isn't a reason to avoid surgery. "The message isn't that you shouldn't have surgery," said Sun. "Rather, there are things that anesthesiologists can do to reduce the risk by finding other ways of controlling the pain and using replacements for opioids when possible." For the study, the researchers examined medical claims of ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Oxycodone, Surgery, Methadone, Hydrocodone, Percocet, Tramadol, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Opana, Subutex, Dilaudid, Opana ER, Roxicodone

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