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Surgery News

Many Doctors Get Payments From Drug Companies, Study Shows

Posted 5 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 21, 2017 – Many American doctors receive payments from drug companies, but few patients know about those financial ties, a new study finds. Researchers surveyed 3,500 adult patients and then checked on their doctors in Open Payments, a government website that reports drug and medical device company payments to physicians. The study found that within the previous year, 65 percent of patients visited doctors who got payments or gifts from drug or medical device companies, but only 5 percent of the patients were aware of those doctor-industry links. Patients who visited certain types of specialists were even more likely to have seen a doctor who had been paid. For example, the rates were 85 percent among patients who saw an orthopedic surgeon and 77 percent among patients who saw an obstetrician or gynecologist. The study was published recently in the Journal of General ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery, Gynecological Conditions, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

With Nips, Tucks and Fat Transplants, Americans are Reshaping Their Bodies

Posted 2 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 2, 2017 – From face-lifts to fat grafts, Americans are increasingly turning to cosmetic procedures to look their best. The number of these procedures in the United States rose 3 percent last year from 2015, according to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. That's 17.1 million surgeries, Botox injections, chemical peels and other minimally invasive procedures. "A decade ago plastic surgeons might have seen a patient every seven to 10 years when they needed a major procedure like a face-lift or tummy tuck. Now patients have ongoing relationships with their plastic surgeons and feel more comfortable discussing all areas of their body that they may be interested in rejuvenating," ASPS President Dr. Debra Johnson said in a society news release. Removing fat from places where it is unwanted (say, the abdomen) and injecting it to shore up a sagging chin, buttock or breast ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Facial Wrinkles, Gastric Bypass Surgery, Botulinum Toxin Type B, Facial Lipoatrophy, Lip Augmentation, Myobloc, Orbicularis Oculi

Is Surgery Always Needed for Kids' Appendicitis?

Posted 17 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Feb. 17, 2017 – Skipping surgery and treating appendicitis with antibiotics alone may be a safe approach for many children, a new analysis suggests. Reviewing 10 studies on more than 400 young patients, researchers found that nonsurgical treatment for an inflamed appendix appeared effective overall. But, appendicitis recurred in 14 percent of patients, and the study authors urged more research to inform doctors' decision-making. "It may in the future be appropriate to offer nonoperative treatment, with antibiotics, as an alternative to children with acute uncomplicated appendicitis," said study author Dr. Nigel Hall. He's an associate professor of pediatric surgery at the University of Southampton in England. "However, at this stage we would not recommend that nonoperative treatment is offered as treatment outside of a carefully designed research study," Hall added. "This is ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Appendicitis, Appendectomy

Rude, Disrespectful Surgeons May Also Be More Error-Prone: Study

Posted 15 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 15, 2017 – Surgeons with a history of patient complaints regarding their personalities or attitude are also more likely to make mistakes in the operating room, a new study finds. Researchers compared surgical outcomes with patient reports of unprofessional behavior by their doctors at several health systems in the United States. The investigators found that people treated by surgeons who had the most complaints had nearly 14 percent more complications in the month after surgery than patients treated by surgeons viewed as more respectful. Complications included surgical-site infections, pneumonia, kidney conditions, stroke, heart problems, blood clots, sepsis and urinary tract infections, according to the study led by Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) researchers. Lead author Dr. William Cooper said surgeons who are rude and disrespectful to patients might also ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery, Surgical Prophylaxis, Gastrointestinal Surgery

U.S. Doctors Trained Overseas Have Slightly Better Patient Outcomes

Posted 6 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Feb. 3, 2017 – Death rates are lower for older Americans treated by doctors trained in other countries than by those who went to a U.S. medical school, a new study reports. That finding held true even though foreign-trained doctors are more likely to care for patients with more chronic health problems. The results of this study should dispel Americans' concerns about the quality of care provided by doctors trained in other countries, the researchers said. The study included information from more than 1.2 million Medicare patients aged 65 and older. All had been admitted to the hospital between 2011 and 2014. The 30-day death rate was 11.2 percent for patients treated by foreign-trained doctors and 11.6 percent for those treated by U.S.-trained doctors, the investigators found. There was no difference in patient hospital readmission rates. But the cost of care was slightly ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Hip Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery, Head & Neck Surgery, Vascular Surgery, Cardiothoracic Surgery

Half Report Severe Side Effects From Breast Cancer Therapy

Posted 24 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 24, 2017 – About half of early stage breast cancer patients experience severe side effects from their treatment, a new study finds. "It's in patients' best interest to receive their treatments on time and on schedule, whenever possible, to give them the best possible outcome," said study author Dr. Steven Katz. He's professor of health management and policy at the University of Michigan. "Unscheduled care for toxicities [side effects] – including clinic visits, emergency department visits and hospital stays – are expensive, inconvenient and disruptive to both doctors and patients. We need to avoid them whenever possible," Katz said in a university news release. For the study, researchers surveyed almost 2,000 early stage breast cancer patients an average of seven months after diagnosis. The women were asked to rate the severity of seven common treatment side effects: ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Breast Cancer, Fluorouracil, Efudex, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Carac, Herceptin, Taxol, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Taxotere, Carboplatin, Cytoxan, Cyclophosphamide, Paclitaxel, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Adriamycin, Fluoroplex, Doxorubicin, Surgical Prophylaxis, Breast Cancer - Palliative

U.S. Deaths From Cervical Cancer May Be Underestimated

Posted 23 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 23, 2017 – The number of women who die from cervical cancer in the United States may be higher than previously believed, and the risk is greatest among older and black women, a new study finds. "This is a preventable disease and women should not be getting it, let alone dying from it," study leader Anne Rositch, an assistant professor of epidemiology at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, said in a Hopkins news release. Due to big advances in early detection, such as the Pap test, it's long been thought that cervical cancer had made a big retreat in the United States. But the researchers note that prior estimates of cervical cancer death had included women who'd already had a hysterectomy – which can include removal of the uterus and cervix. One in five women in the United States has had a hysterectomy, according to the researchers. Preventive screening such as the Pap ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Cancer, Hysterectomy, Cervical Cancer, Genitourinary Surgical and Other Conditions

Many With Advanced Lung Cancer Don't Get Treatments That Might Help

Posted 20 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 20, 2017 – Many U.S. patients with late-stage lung cancer do not receive treatments that could prolong their lives, a new study finds. Researchers at the University of California, Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center analyzed 1998-2012 data from the U.S. National Cancer Database. They found that more than one in every five patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) – by far the leading form of the disease – did not undergo any treatment. That included chemotherapy, radiotherapy or surgery, the researchers said. Many of the untreated patients were women, elderly, minorities, low-income and uninsured, according to the research team. The researchers found that the number of untreated patients with late-stage NSCLC even rose slightly during the study period. The reasons why some patients went untreated remain unclear, the researchers said. "We were able to identify a ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Cancer, Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer, Bronchogenic Carcinoma, Merkel Cell Carcinoma, Malignant Pleural Effusion

Plastic Surgeons Often Miss Patients' Mental Disorders

Posted 18 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 18, 2016 – Nearly one in 10 patients seeking facial plastic surgery suffers from a mental illness that distorts their perception of physical defects, but doctors often don't spot the problem, new research suggests. Researchers found that plastic surgeons correctly identified the diagnosis of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) in less than 5 percent of patients who screened positive for the disorder. According to published reports, many specialists suspect that the late superstar Michael Jackson – who underwent repeated plastic surgeries that dramatically changed his appearance – struggled with body dysmorphic disorder. Those affected with BDD, considered a type of obsessive-compulsive disorder, are overly preoccupied with perceived body defects that are actually miniscule and commonly involve the nose, eyes, skin or hair, the study authors said. "We all knew patients with ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Psychiatric Disorders, Facial Wrinkles, Body Dysmorphic Disorder, Head & Neck Surgery, Facial Lipoatrophy, Lip Augmentation, Orbicularis Oculi

Steep Bills Surprise Patients Who Go 'Out-of-Network'

Posted 17 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 17, 2017 – Patients using specialists outside their health-plan network often receive surprise bills for services that cost far more than what Medicare considers a fair rate, a new study suggests. Most insurers use rates set by Medicare – the publicly funded insurance program for the elderly – as the benchmark for what they'll pay health care providers. But a look at 400,000 U.S. physicians' charges found many doctors bill their private-paying patients two, three, even six times more than what Medicare pays for the same services, the study revealed. The highest markups – four or more times greater than the Medicare rate – were for certain specialty services, including anesthesiology, interventional radiology, emergency medicine and pathology. Anesthesiologists had the highest markup, charging six times what Medicare considers a reasonable amount, the researchers ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Lidocaine, Sedation, Anesthesia, Propofol, Ketamine, Xylocaine, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Local Anesthesia, Bupivacaine, Marcaine, Diprivan, Novocain, Septocaine, Nitrous Oxide, Procaine, Light Sedation, Mepivacaine, Tetracaine

Should More Kids Have Their Tonsils Out?

Posted 17 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 17, 2017 – Because of stringent tonsillectomy guidelines, some kids who could benefit from tonsil removal surgery aren't getting it, two new reviews suggest. To qualify for the surgery, a child must have many recurring throat infections within a short span of time or severe sleep disturbances, said Dr. Sivakumar Chinnadurai, a co-author of the reviews. An evaluation of current medical evidence suggests more kids would receive significant short-term improvement in their daily life if the guidelines were relaxed, said Chinnadurai, a pediatric otolaryngologist with Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville. Children experienced nearly half as many sore throats when they underwent a tonsillectomy, even if they didn't meet the guidelines, Chinnadurai and his colleagues found. The kids also missed fewer days of school and were less likely to need medical care. However, ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Sleep Apnea, Sore Throat, Head & Neck Surgery, Surgical Prophylaxis, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome

Heavy Kids Fare Worse in One Way After Surgery

Posted 13 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 13, 2017 – Here's yet another reason to watch your child's weight: Overweight and obese kids seem to be more likely than others to develop a wound infection after surgery, a new study suggests. Researchers have already documented this connection in adults. But, "research on this topic among children and adolescents is scarce," said study co-author Dr. Catherine Hunter, one of the study authors. "The information from this first-of-its-kind study can now be used in assessing and counseling preoperative pediatric surgical patients and their families," said Hunter. She's a pediatric surgeon at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago. In the United States, childhood obesity has nearly tripled since the 1970s, which suggests more children may face these infections, she and her colleagues said. Using statistics from a U.S. surgical database, the researchers focused ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Surgery, Obesity, Weight Loss

Many With Breast Cancer Unnecessarily Choose Double Mastectomy: Study

Posted 22 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 21, 2016 – Many women with early stage breast cancer choose to have their healthy opposite breast removed, even when there are no medical indications that such a step is necessary, a new survey finds. That's especially true when the surgeon doesn't offer a recommendation either way, the researchers said. "We are seeing that one in six breast cancer patients are choosing bilateral mastectomy when this aggressive procedure is not going to benefit them in terms of survival," said Dr. Reshma Jagsi. Jagsi, who led the study, is a professor and deputy chair of radiation oncology at the University of Michigan School of Medicine. Cancer specialists say no compelling evidence suggests a survival advantage for most patients to chose a double mastectomy. Also, the risk of getting cancer in the opposite healthy breast is low for most patients, they note. However, after actress ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Breast Cancer - Palliative, Osteolytic Bone Metastases of Breast Cancer

Emergency Surgery Riskier for Kids in Poorer Countries

Posted 13 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 13, 2016 – Children in poorer countries are much more likely to die after emergency abdominal surgery than those in wealthy nations, a new study finds. Researchers analyzed the outcomes of more than 1,400 children in 43 countries who had emergency abdominal surgery in 2014. The surgeries were for conditions such as appendicitis, congenital abnormalities and hernia. Compared to children in wealthy countries, those in middle-income nations were four times more likely to die within 30 days of surgery, and those in poor countries were seven times more likely to die, the study found. Rates of serious complications were just over 11 percent among children in poor countries, compared with just over 6 percent for those in middle-income and rich countries. Rates of wound infection were 21 percent for children in poor countries, 9.6 percent for those in middle-income countries, and ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Appendectomy, Surgical Prophylaxis, Vascular Surgery, Gastrointestinal Surgery

Strength Training May Prevent Side Effect of Breast Cancer Surgery

Posted 9 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 9, 2016 – Strength training might benefit breast cancer survivors who've undergone surgery, researchers suggest. In a small study, weightlifting appeared to help prevent swelling in the arms and chest, a common side effect of breast cancer treatment. The study included 27 breast cancer survivors who did supervised moderate-intensity strength workouts twice a week. Each woman's regimen was matched to her ability. The women were checked every two weeks. Three had reductions in swelling and the rest did not develop any swelling. Many of the women also said they were better able to perform everyday tasks, such as opening jars or lifting heavy objects. "At one time, women were told they shouldn't do upper-body activities after surgery and treatment because doctors thought it could actually cause swelling to become worse," said study author Lynn Panton. She is a professor of ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Surgical Prophylaxis, Breast Cancer - Palliative

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Surgical Prophylaxis, Ophthalmic Surgery, Head & Neck Surgery, Gastrointestinal Surgery, Neurosurgery, Postoperative Albumin Loss, Orthopedic Surgery, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Vascular Surgery, Genitourinary Surgical and Other Conditions, Biliary Tract Surgery, Extracorporeal Perfusion