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Nearly 1 in 5 U.S. Adults Has Mental Illness or Drug Problem

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 21, 2017 – Nearly 1 in 5 American adults deals with a mental illness or substance abuse problem each year, a U.S. government study says. Oregon has the highest rate, and New Jersey the lowest, according to 2012-2014 data analyzed by the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). Overall, almost 44 million Americans 18 or older had a diagnosable mental, behavioral or emotional disorder in the past year, researchers said. They reviewed national surveys on drug use and health. "The figures in SAMHSA's report remind us how important it is to take mental health as seriously as any other health condition," Kana Enomoto, SAMHSA acting deputy assistant secretary, said in an agency news release. The overall national rate of mental illness was about 18 percent. In Oregon, almost 23 percent of the state residents had any type of mental illness. Utah, ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Bipolar Disorder, Oxycodone, Anxiety and Stress, Hydrocodone, Tramadol, Percocet, Methadone, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Major Depressive Disorder, Opiate Dependence, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab

Many Terminal Cancer Patients Remain in Denial

Posted 6 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 19, 2017 – Nearly 10 percent of patients with terminal cancer don't want to know they're dying, which can make their final days more difficult, a new study finds. Unwillingness to face poor prospects can lead to unnecessary treatments and keep patients from making end-of-life plans, the researchers reported recently in The Oncologist. "Health care professionals should appropriately assess patients' readiness for prognostic information," said study leader Siew-Tzuh Tang, a professor at Chang Gung University School of Nursing in Taiwan. Doctors should respect patients' reluctance to confront their poor prognosis if they are not ready to know, "but sensitively coach them to cultivate their accurate prognostic awareness," Tang said in a journal news release. The study involved nearly 250 terminal cancer patients in Taiwan. They were questioned several times over their last ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Cancer, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Lung Cancer, Renal Cell Carcinoma, Colorectal Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Brain Tumor, Skin Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, Pancreatic Cancer, Cervical Cancer, Stomach Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prevention

One Social Hour a Week Can Help Someone With Dementia

Posted 9 days ago by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, July 16, 2017 – Just a slight increase in social interaction benefits older adults with dementia and lowers health care costs, a new British study suggests. "People with dementia who are living in [nursing] homes are among the most vulnerable in our society," said study leader Clive Ballard. He's a professor at the University of Exeter Medical School in England. "Our outcomes show that good staff training and just one hour a week of social interaction significantly improves quality of life for a group of people who can often be forgotten by society," Ballard said in a university news release. The study included more than 800 dementia patients living in 69 nursing homes in the U.K. Two staff members at each home were trained to engage in simple social activities with the patients. This included talking to them about their interests and decisions about their care. When combined ... Read more

Related support groups: Social Anxiety Disorder, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features

When Opinions Threaten Friendships

Posted 13 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 13, 2017 – Friendships are supportive connections, and it's not always easy to make them in adulthood. So protecting them is important. People tend to pick friends and stay connected to those who have similar interests and beliefs. But what happens when you and a good friend disagree on an important issue? Here are some tips on how to enjoy your friendship despite strong differences, whether they're over money, parenting techniques or even politics. One approach is to agree to disagree. When neither of you is going to change your mind, there's often no point in even having the hot-button discussion. If previous experience tells you not to talk about a certain topic with your friend, make conscious choices for conversation that are "safe" – like work, travel and hobbies. Focus on what you have in common and remind yourself of the experiences you've shared. Look at the ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Social Anxiety Disorder

Health Tip: Parenting a College Freshman

Posted 14 days ago by Drugs.com

-- As your child transitions from high school to life as a college student, you can still show that you care – from a distance. The American Academy of Pediatrics suggests: Call your child regularly to check in. Visit your child at school, more frequently than just on parents' weekend. Get to know the parents of your child's roommates and friends. If you suspect homesickness, encourage your child to talk to school counselors. Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Social Anxiety Disorder

Getting Over Guilt

Posted 20 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 6, 2017 – Do you sometimes feel weighed down by guilt? Guilt over unethical behavior is so powerful that it can make you feel as though you've gained weight – even when your actual weight stays the same, according to a study by U.S. and Canadian researchers. Guilt is an important emotion. Appropriate guilt helps you recognize when you've made a mistake, and stops you from making the same mistake again. But sometimes we feel guilty even though we've done nothing wrong, and there is no misstep to think about or fix. If you're feeling guilty, figure out whether it's healthy and appropriate. If it is, the next step is to take action. The sooner you apologize or correct what you did wrong, the faster the guilt will go away. Once you've done this, it's important to recognize that you can't change the past – you need to let it go. As you move forward, try to learn from the ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Dysthymia, Psychiatric Disorders, Performance Anxiety

Bullying Takes Financial Toll on U.S. School Districts

Posted 20 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 6, 2017 – Bullying can come with a hefty hidden cost for U.S. schools, a new study finds. California loses about $276 million each year in attendance-based public school funding because bullied children are too afraid to go to school, researchers report. Data revealed that 10 percent of students missed at least one day of school in the previous month because they felt unsafe. That translates into an estimated 301,000 students missing school because they didn't feel safe, leading to hundreds of millions of dollars in lost funding, according to the research team from the University of Texas at Austin. "Bullying is a big social problem that not only creates an unhealthy climate for individuals, but also undermines schools and communities," said study author Stephen Russell, chair of human development and family sciences. "We are interested in the economics of bullying and ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Social Anxiety Disorder

Poor Sleep May Worsen Suicidal Thoughts

Posted 28 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 28, 2017 – Sleep problems may provide early clues about worsening suicidal thoughts in at-risk young adults as well as a potential way to intervene, a new study suggests. "Suicide is the tragic outcome of psychiatric illness interacting with multiple biological, psychological and social risk factors," said lead author Rebecca Bernert. She is a suicidologist and assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences from Stanford University Medical School. "Sleep disturbances stand apart from other risk factors because they are visible as a warning sign, yet non-stigmatizing and highly treatable. This is why we believe they may represent an important treatment target in suicide prevention," she said in a university news release. How could sleep potentially prevent a suicide? "Sleep is a barometer of our well-being, and directly impacts how we feel the next day. We ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Bipolar Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Major Depressive Disorder, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Fatigue, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Schizophrenia, Mania, Borderline Personality Disorder, Dysthymia, Psychiatric Disorders, Drowsiness, Severe Mood Dysregulation, Cyclothymic Disorder, Hypersomnia

Suicide Risk Especially High for U.S. Farmers

Posted 21 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 21, 2017 – Two decades after the U.S. farm crisis, the suicide rate among American farmers remains much higher than among other workers, a new study finds. "Occupational factors such as poor access to quality health care, isolation and financial stress interact with life factors to continue to place farmers at a disproportionately high risk for suicide," said study co-author Corinne Peek-Asa. She is a professor of occupational and environmental health at the University of Iowa College of Public Health. Peek-Asa and her colleagues found that 230 U.S. farmers died by suicide between 1992 and 2010. The annual suicide rate among farmers ranged between 0.36 and 0.95 per 100,000 during those years, according to the study. Meanwhile, the highest annual suicide rate for all other occupations during that time never exceeded 0.19 per 100,000, the researchers said. Suicide rates ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Dysthymia

Study Cites Top Reasons Young Autism Patients Are Hospitalized

Posted 16 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 16, 2017 – Having a mood disorder significantly boosts the odds that young people with autism will be hospitalized for psychiatric care, according to a new study. People with autism are often hospitalized when their behavior problems overwhelm their caregivers, the study authors said. "The demand is far greater than the number of clinicians, the number of programs and the number of beds we have," said study leader Giulia Righi. She is an assistant professor of psychiatry and human behavior research at Brown University's Warren Alpert Medical School. Righi's team reviewed records of 473 people with autism, aged 4 to 20. The risk of hospitalization was seven times higher for those with a mood disorder. In addition, sleep problems more than doubled the chances of a hospital stay. And those with high scores on a scale of autism symptom severity had a slightly increased risk, ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Bipolar Disorder, Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Social Anxiety Disorder, Mania, Borderline Personality Disorder, Autism, Psychiatric Disorders, Asperger Syndrome, Severe Mood Dysregulation, Body Dysmorphic Disorder, Cyclothymic Disorder, Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder

When Parents Focus on Smartphones, Kids' Misbehaving Can Rise

Posted 15 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 15, 2017 – Could your smartphone prompt a toddler tantrum? Perhaps, a new study suggests. Young children whose parents interrupt family time by pulling out their smartphones or tablets appear more prone to misbehaviors, such as whining, sulking and tantrums, the research revealed. Study author Brandon McDaniel coined the term "technoference" about five years ago when researching technology's intrusion into face-to-face interactions and relationships. His new findings on kids and parents reinforce established research focusing on technology's effects on child development. "Do you like it when you feel snubbed by someone, when that person isn't validating or listening to you?" asked McDaniel. He's an assistant professor of human development and family science at Illinois State University. "It's the same thing with kids, but since they're not adults, the way they show it is ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Social Anxiety Disorder

Chronic Pain Common in Adults With Depression, Anxiety

Posted 6 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 6, 2017 – Chronic pain afflicts about half of adults who have anxiety or depression, a new study finds. More than 5,000 adults in Brazil diagnosed with anxiety or mood disorders such as depression and bipolar disorder were asked about other health problems. Among those with a mood disorder, half reported chronic pain; 33 percent, respiratory diseases; 10 percent, heart disease; 9 percent, arthritis; and 7 percent, diabetes. Among those with anxiety, 45 percent reported chronic pain; 30 percent, respiratory diseases; and 11 percent each for arthritis and heart disease. Adults with two or more chronic diseases had an increased risk of a mood or anxiety disorder. High blood pressure was associated with both disorders at 23 percent, according to the Columbia University study published online June 1 in the Journal of Affective Disorders. Senior author Dr. Silvia Martins said ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Bipolar Disorder, Suboxone, Oxycodone, Anxiety and Stress, Lexapro, Zoloft, Hydrocodone, Cymbalta, Tramadol, Percocet, Methadone, OxyContin, Effexor, Prozac, Vicodin, Norco

Can Loneliness Rob You of Needed Sleep?

Posted 1 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 1, 2017 – Loneliness may rob you of your sleep, British researchers report. In the study, more than 2,200 18- and 19-year-olds in England and Wales provided information about their loneliness levels and sleeping patterns. Between 25 percent and 30 percent of the participants said they felt lonely sometimes, and another 5 percent said they frequently felt lonely. Lonelier people were 24 percent more likely to feel tired and have difficulty concentrating during the day, according to the King's College London researchers. "Diminished sleep quality is one of the many ways in which loneliness gets under the skin, and our findings underscore the importance of early therapeutic approaches to target the negative thoughts and perceptions that can make loneliness a vicious cycle," said study author Louise Arseneault. "Many of the young people in our study are currently at ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Major Depressive Disorder, Fatigue, Social Anxiety Disorder, Dysthymia

Advocating for a Loved One

Posted 1 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 1, 2017 – There are times in life, like a health crisis, when a loved one needs you to be their eyes, ears and voice. Though you may be feeling anguish over his or her illness, a patient's pain, fear or even the effects of medication can keep them from being their own advocate. But, you can play a role not only in supporting them through a stressful time, but also in making sure they're getting the best care. Gathering information is key. Ask questions and do research about their medical condition, treatments, specialists in the field and even the best hospital or surgery center for having a procedure done. Get to know the doctors involved and ask for specifics if you don't understand any terms they use. Don't hesitate to bring another family member with you, especially when surgery or other complex procedures are being discussed. Keep careful notes. Even a minor illness ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Social Anxiety Disorder

MS-Related Brain Changes May Affect Social Skills

Posted 1 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 1, 2017 – Subtle brain changes may explain why some people with multiple sclerosis (MS) lose their ability to interpret clues about what other people are thinking and feeling, a new study suggests. Until now, there has been little study of the way MS affects the so-called "social brain." Portuguese researchers wanted to learn why some people with MS develop a social disconnect that can hurt relationships and breed isolation. It doesn't happen to everyone with MS, but experts agree that it's a big deal for those who experience it. "It could interfere with all spheres of social interaction," said lead researcher Dr. Sonia Batista, a neurologist at the University of Coimbra in Portugal. "The ability to interpret other people's feelings and intentions may influence people's ability to maintain a job and their relationships with family and friends," said Batista. That's ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Social Anxiety Disorder, Multiple Sclerosis, Performance Anxiety, Chronic Spasticity, Spasticity, Diagnosis and Investigation, Upper Limb Spasticity, Lower Limb Spasticity, Spinal Spasticity

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