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Homeless, Mentally Ill Youth Benefit From Housing Program

Posted 1 day 4 hours ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28, 2016 – A subsidized independent-living intervention appears to help homeless young people with mental illness get and keep a roof over their heads, a new Canadian study indicates. Called Housing First, the program has previously been tested with homeless adults with mental illness, and has been found to improve housing stability and quality of life, the researchers said. "Housing First is based on the concept of housing as a human right," said study lead author Dr. Nicole Kozloff. "[It's] the idea that having a safe and stable place to live is critical to helping people improve their mental health and achieve their goals," she said. Kozloff is a postdoctoral fellow with the Centre for Urban Health Solutions at the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto. Since it first was first introduced in the 1990s, studies have repeatedly found ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Bipolar Disorder, Panic Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Schizophrenia, Mania, Paranoid Disorder, Schizoaffective Disorder, Agitation, Autism, Psychosis, Psychiatric Disorders, Asperger Syndrome, Drug Psychosis

Health Tip: Managing Daily Stress

Posted 2 days 4 hours ago by Drugs.com

-- Stress can add up to serious emotional and physical health problems. Learning to manage it can help you handle whatever comes your way. The American Academy of Family Physicians recommends: Trying not to spend time worrying about things that are out of your control. Finding ways to tackle small problems, giving you a better sense of control. Preparing for stressful events, such as a job interview. Viewing changes as challenges to embrace, rather than as threats. Finding ways to resolve problems with others. Leaning on friends, loved ones or counselors for support. Avoiding a cluttered schedule. Keeping your goals realistic. Exercising regularly, eating nutritious food and getting enough sleep. Blowing off steam with a hobby or sport you enjoy. Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Panic Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Performance Anxiety

How Much Video Gaming Is Too Much for Kids?

Posted 2 days 4 hours ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 27, 2016 – Playing video games might improve a child's motor skills, reaction time and even academic performance, but new research shows that too much gaming can be linked to social and behavioral problems. Spanish investigators found that any skill enhancements linked to gaming among those aged 7 to 11 started to max out after about eight hours of gaming a week. And those who played nine hours or more a week were more likely to have social and behavioral problems. The bottom-line: "One to nine hours per week seems to be safe, but playing more than nine hours – one hour on weekdays and two hours on weekend days – may be not recommended for children 7 to 11 years old," said study author Dr. Jesus Pujol. But the study "does not permit [us] to directly establish whether the observed effects are a cause or consequence of gaming," Pujol stressed. "That is, children with ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Social Anxiety Disorder

Internet Addiction May Be Red Flag for Other Mental Health Issues: Study

Posted 10 days ago by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Sept. 18, 2016 – Internet addiction may signal other mental health issues among college students, according to a new study. Canadian researchers say their findings could affect how psychiatrists approach people who spend a significant amount of time online. For the study, the researchers evaluated the internet use of 254 freshmen at McMaster University in Ontario. The researchers used a tool called the Internet Addiction Test (IAT), developed in 1998, as well as their own scale based on more recent criteria. "Internet use has changed radically over the last 18 years, through more people working online, media streaming, social media, etc. We were concerned that the IAT questionnaire may not have been picking up on problematic modern internet use, or showing up false positives for people who were simply using the internet rather than being over-reliant on it," said chief ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Bipolar Disorder, Major Depressive Disorder, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Schizophrenia, Mania, Borderline Personality Disorder, Schizoaffective Disorder, Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Psychosis, Psychiatric Disorders, Dependent Personality Disorder, Executive Function Disorder

Seniors Not Scared of Social Media After All

Posted 17 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 12, 2016 – The notion that seniors shy away from social media may be off the mark. A new study found that many older people enjoy using social technology, and it helps them combat loneliness and might even benefit their health. The findings challenge the popular belief that seniors aren't interested in or have difficulty using social technology, such as email, instant messaging, Facebook, Twitter or Skype. Michigan State University researcher William Chopik examined survey responses from nearly 600 older Americans, average age 68, and found that more than 95 percent were either "somewhat" or "very" satisfied with social technology, while 72 percent said they were not opposed to learning new technologies. "Despite the attention that the digital divide has garnered in recent years, a large proportion of older adults use technology to maintain their social networks and make ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Social Anxiety Disorder

Mouse Study Hints at Which Brain Cells Trigger Fear

Posted 9 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 9, 2016 – In experiments with mice, researchers say they have found cells in the brain that play a major role in triggering anxiety. These cells are in a part of the brain called the hypothalamus, the scientists said. To pinpoint these cells, the researchers blocked cells from getting the stress hormone called corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). CRH is a hormone involved in the body's "fight-or-flight" response, the researchers explained. Much to the researchers surprise, when CRH was blocked in some cells, anxiety behaviors such as vigilance, fear and suspicion were reduced, said one of the study's authors, Rhong Zang. He's with the division of Endocrinology at Boston Children's Hospital. Without the influence of CRH in these cells, mice were able to do things they normally feared, such as walking on elevated gangplanks, exploring brightly lit areas and approaching ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Performance Anxiety

Average Lifespan Longer for Twins

Posted 23 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 23, 2016 – Twins live longer than other people, and their close social connection may be a major reason why, a new study says. Researchers reviewed data from more than 2,900 same-sex twins. They were born in Denmark between 1870 and 1900. The study only included data from twins who lived past age 10. The researchers compared the twins to the general Danish population. At every age, identical twins had higher survival rates than fraternal twins. And, fraternal twins had higher survival rates than people in the general population. For men, the peak survival benefit of being a twin was at age 45. Male twins' survival rate at that age was 90 percent, compared with 84 percent in the general population. For women, the peak survival benefit of being a twin occurred in their early 60s. About 10 percent more female twins made it to their early 60s than in the general population. ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Social Anxiety Disorder

Couples At Risk During 'Divorce Season'

Posted 21 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Aug. 21, 2016 – Are certain times of the year harder on a marriage? Maybe, suggests new research that found Americans are more likely to file for divorce after winter and summer holidays. And, that's true even though many couples view the holidays as a time when things might get better, the researchers said. "People tend to face the holidays with rising expectations, despite what disappointments they might have had in years past. They represent periods in the year when there's the anticipation or the opportunity for a new beginning, a new start, something different, a transition into a new period of life. It's like an optimism cycle, in a sense," researcher Julie Brines, an associate professor of sociology from the University of Washington, said in a university news release. "They're very symbolically charged moments in time for the culture," she added. However, holidays can be ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Social Anxiety Disorder

Teen Cyberbullies More Apt to Be Friends Than Strangers

Posted 21 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, Aug. 20, 2016 – Cyberbullying among teens is highly likely to involve current or former friends and dating partners, a new study finds. Researchers analyzed data from a 2011 survey of nearly 800 students in grades 8 through 12 at a public school in a New York City suburb. About 17 percent had been involved with cyberbullying in the previous week, the study found. Nearly 6 percent of those students were victims; about 9 percent were aggressors; and about 2 percent were both. Cyberbullying usually occurred through Facebook or texting, the study authors said. Girls were twice as likely as boys to be victimized. The risk of cyberbullying was seven times higher among current or former friends and dating partners than among those who had never been friends or dated, according to the study. "A common concern regarding cyberbullying is that strangers can attack someone, but here we ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Dysthymia

Are Tinder Users Tender About Their Looks?

Posted 4 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 4, 2016 – Young adults who use the popular dating app Tinder may have lower self-esteem and be less satisfied with their looks, a new study suggests. Researchers found that of more than 1,300 college students surveyed, those who used Tinder tended to have more issues with self-esteem and body image. But the study does not prove the dating app actually feeds those problems. "We really can't say that Tinder 'caused' anything, based on these results," said lead researcher Trent Petrie, a professor of psychology at the University of North Texas. And Jessica Carbino, Tinder's resident sociologist, took issue with what she called the study's small sample size and its "limited population" – students at two U.S. colleges. "The findings cannot be considered significant or representative as a result of major methodological flaws," Carbino said. But it's important to study the ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Anxiety, Contraception, Anxiety and Stress, Emergency Contraception, Social Anxiety Disorder, Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Postcoital Contraception

Stressed Dads Can Affect Kids' Development

Posted 3 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 2, 2016 – When dads are stressed out about parenting, it may take a toll on their toddlers' development, a new study suggests. The study, of more than 730 families, found that when fathers had high levels of "parenting stress," their sons tended to have poorer language skills at age 3. And both boys and girls typically scored lower on tests of cognition – which refers to abilities such as paying attention, learning and reasoning. Researchers said the findings add to the growing understanding of how fathers affect their children's development. When it comes to kids' well-being, studies have traditionally focused on moms' influence, said Tamesha Harewood, one of the researchers on the new work. But more recently, studies have been digging into fathers' unique role. Researchers found that involved dads can affect preschoolers' language skills and emotional development – as ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder

Study of Teen Brains Offers Clues to Timing of Mental Illness

Posted 27 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 27, 2016 – Changes that occur in teens' brains as they mature may help explain why the first signs of mental illness tend to appear during this time, researchers report. British researchers used MRI scans to compare the brain structures of nearly 300 participants who were aged 14 to 24. The scientists discovered that the brain's outer region (cortex) becomes thinner as teens get older. At the same time, they saw that levels of myelin increased within the cortex. That increase was seen in critical regions of the brain that act as connection points between other regions. Myelin is the sheath that covers nerve fibers and enables them to communicate efficiently. "During our teenage years, our brains continue to develop. When we're still children, these changes may be more dramatic, but in adolescence we see that the changes refine the detail," explained study first author ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Bipolar Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Schizophrenia, Severe Mood Dysregulation, Diagnosis and Investigation, Head Imaging, Dependent Personality Disorder

Can Trauma Trigger Violent Crime in Mentally Ill?

Posted 14 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 13, 2016 – People with serious mental illness who are victims of violence or exposed to stressful events are more likely to engage in a violent crime in the week following the trauma, a new study contends. Stressful experiences also affect people without psychiatric disorders, but not to the same extent, the researchers said. Some stressful events – such as being violently victimized, injured in an accident, losing one's parents or self-harming – act as "triggers," said study co-author Dr. Seena Fazel. He is a professor of forensic psychiatry at the University of Oxford in England. Experiencing one of these events increases the risk of committing a violent criminal act within a week of the trigger, especially in people with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, Fazel said. People diagnosed with these conditions have higher rates of criminal convictions than the general ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Schizophrenia, Paranoid Disorder, Schizoaffective Disorder, Agitation, Psychosis, Agitated State, Psychiatric Disorders, Drug Psychosis, Executive Function Disorder

Health Tip: Manage Emotional Stress

Posted 13 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Life's many changes can be stressful, which may harm your health. The American Academy of Family Physicians advises: Learn to recognize the first signs of stress, such as neck stiffness or clenching a fist. Learn to let go of things you can't control. For stressful situations such as a job interview, prepare as much as you can. Change your outlook. View changes as a challenge, rather than a threat. If there are conflicts at work, try to resolve them. Don't overschedule yourself. Find a friend, loved one or other trusted source to talk with when you feel stressed. Engage in an activity that helps you feel relaxed, such as a hobby or sport. Get regular exercise, nutritious meals and plenty of sleep. Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Social Anxiety Disorder

Heat Waves Are Health Threats

Posted 3 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, July 2, 2016 – Heat waves are more than uncomfortable, they can be deadly. That's especially true in large cities. And, seniors, children and people with chronic health problems are at higher risk for heat-related illness and death, according to Dr. Robert Glatter. He's an emergency physician at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. "Those who have high blood pressure, heart disease, diabetes, kidney disease, as well as those who suffer with mental illness, may be at risk for heat-related emergencies, including heat cramps, heat syncope (fainting), heat exhaustion, as well as heat stroke," he said in a hospital news release. "Various classes of medications including beta blockers, as well as diuretics, can impair sweating – ultimately disrupting the body's ability to cool itself. Other medications including antihistamines, as well as antidepressants and sedatives, may also ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Lexapro, Zoloft, Cymbalta, Effexor, Prozac, Celexa, Hypertension, Citalopram, Paxil, Major Depressive Disorder, Metoprolol, Sertraline, Pristiq, Social Anxiety Disorder, Amitriptyline, Fluoxetine

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