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Related terms: Mental Illness

Teasing Teens About Weight May Do Lasting Harm

Posted 1 day 18 hours ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 25, 2017 – Teens who are taunted about their weight may be more likely to become obese adults who struggle with poor body image, a new study finds. Researchers also found that teens who are bullied about their weight are more likely to become emotional eaters. Teen bullies often target peers' weight, but weight-based teasing can also occur at home. "Our findings suggest the need for broader anti-bullying initiatives that include both the school and family/home environments as targets for intervention," lead author Rebecca Puhl said in a University of Connecticut news release. Puhl is a professor and deputy director of the university's Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity. The researchers found that teens who face insults about their weight not only may be upset at the time, they may face serious long-term consequences, including obesity as well as unhealthy dieting and ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Obesity, Weight Loss, Psychiatric Disorders

City Life Tough on Teens' Mental Health

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 23, 2017 – City life seems to take a toll on the adolescent mind, new research suggests. The study included more than 2,000 18-year-olds in England and Wales who were interviewed about psychotic experiences (such as hearing voices and feeling extremely paranoid) since age 12. The research team from King's College London and Duke University found that teens raised in large cities were over 40 percent more likely to report psychotic experiences than those who grew up in rural areas. "These findings highlight the importance of early, preventative strategies for reducing psychosis risk and suggests that adolescents living in threatening neighborhoods within cities should be made a priority," said study co-senior author Helen Fisher. She is from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience at King's College. "If we intervene early enough – for example by offering ... Read more

Related support groups: Schizophrenia, Schizoaffective Disorder, Psychosis, Psychiatric Disorders, Depressive Psychosis, Drug Psychosis

Women Aren't Better at Reading People's Faces After All

Posted 8 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, May 19, 2017 – When it comes to spotting a familiar face, men are just as gifted as women, a new study suggests. The finding contradicts the widely held belief that women are better at recognizing faces and reading facial expressions than men are, the Penn State researchers said. "There has been common lore in the behavioral literature that women do better than men in many types of face-processing tasks, such as face recognition and detecting and categorizing facial expressions, although, when you look in the empirical literature, the findings are not so clear-cut," said researcher Suzy Scherf. She is an assistant professor of psychology and neuroscience. "I went into this work fully expecting to see an effect of biological sex on the part of the observer in facial recognition – and we did not find any. And we looked really hard," she added in a Penn State news release. Facial ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Bipolar Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Schizophrenia, Schizoaffective Disorder, Paranoid Disorder, Psychiatric Disorders, Dysthymia, Diagnosis and Investigation

What Harms the Young Heart Also Hurts the Brain Later

Posted 17 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 10, 2017 – High blood pressure, elevated cholesterol or a smoking habit early in life increases your odds for mental decline during middle age, a new study warns. "While it is well known that high blood pressure, cholesterol and smoking are associated with poor cognitive [mental] performance in adults, the effects of these risk factors from childhood on midlife cognition were unknown," study lead author Suvi Rovio said in a news release from the American College of Cardiology. "These findings support the need for active monitoring and treatment strategies against cardiovascular risk factors from childhood," said Rovio, a senior scientist at the University of Turku, in Finland. For the study, Rovio and colleagues analyzed data from thousands of people in Finland who were followed from childhood to adulthood. The investigators found that high blood pressure and high ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Smoking, High Cholesterol, Smoking Cessation, Psychiatric Disorders, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Reasons Why Parents Should Be Wary of '13 Reasons Why'

Posted 4 May 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 4, 2017 – It started as a bestselling novel aimed at teens. In 2007, Thirteen Reasons Why, by first-time novelist Jay Asher, outlined the story of a 16-year-old named Hannah Baker. In the book, Hannah recounts – from beyond the grave – the high school gossip, humiliation, bullying, invasion of privacy, betrayal and sexual assault that led her to suicide. In the spring of 2017, "13 Reasons Why" became an even more popular 13-episode series on Netflix. How popular? Netflix doesn't provide ratings. But in the month since it began streaming in its entirety, evidence of the series' wide reach can be seen in the young binge-watchers who've swamped social media to discuss the show. Twitter, for one, has already been deluged with 11 million series-related tweets. And that, says Variety magazine, makes the Netflix hit "the most tweeted-about show of 2017" so far. According to ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Psychiatric Disorders, Dysthymia

Are Smartphones Helping or Harming Kids' Mental Health?

Posted 3 May 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 3, 2017 – Parents worry – often rightly so – about how much time their kids are spending in front of screens. Now, new research suggests that when children at risk of mental health problems spend a lot of time on smartphones or other digital technology, they're more at risk of attention and disruptive behavior issues. But the news isn't all bad. The researchers also saw a positive benefit from screen time. When kids sent more text messages on any given day, they seemed less anxious and depressed. "These findings suggest that for already at-risk teens, high usage may amplify existing problems," said study co-author Candice Odgers. But, Odgers added, "we cannot say that technology use is causing these problems." She is a professor of psychology and neuroscience at Duke University's Sanford School of Public Policy in Durham, N.C. Electronic devices such as smartphones and ... Read more

Related support groups: Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Psychiatric Disorders

Mental Health Myths Abound in the U.S.

Posted 2 May 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 2, 2017 – Ignorance, myths and stigma are still common among Americans when it comes to mental health, a new survey finds. The web-based survey of nearly 4,600 people nationwide revealed that less than half can recognize anxiety. Most people don't know what to do about depression even if they recognize it. And nearly 80 percent don't believe prescription drug abuse is a treatable problem. The Michigan State University survey, released at the start of Mental Health Month in May, focused on four major issues: anxiety, depression, alcohol abuse and prescription drug abuse. "Our work is designed to help communities think about how to address behavioral health challenges as they emerge, whether that's drug abuse, anxiety or other issues, and the challenges such as suicide that can accompany them," co-investigator Mark Skidmore said in a university news release. "Although great ... Read more

Related support groups: Psychiatric Disorders

Psychiatric Scars of Wartime Brain Injury May Linger for Years

Posted 1 May 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 1, 2017 (HealthDay News ) – Brain injuries suffered during wartime exposure to an explosive device often leave psychiatric troubles that can last years, new research shows. The study also discovered an "evolution" of symptoms, as cognitive (thinking and memory) symptoms ease, but psychological aftereffects linger. Many soldiers who've suffered a traumatic brain injury "experience evolution rather than resolution of symptoms from the one- to five-year outcomes," said a team led by Christine MacDonald, from the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle. One expert in head injury care said the findings raise important concerns. "This suggests that soldiers experiencing a traumatic brain injury – especially those at higher risk for psychiatric effects – require much closer monitoring in the years after their injury," said Dr. Robert Glatter. He directs sports ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Psychiatric Disorders

Genes May Govern Your Risk for PTSD

Posted 26 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 26, 2017 – Surviving trauma such as assault, rape or wartime combat can leave a person emotionally devastated. Now, new research suggests your genes may help determine whether you go on to suffer post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). "Our finding that PTSD is heritable suggests that our genes contain clues for why some people develop PTSD and others do not, despite having experienced a similar event," said lead researcher Karestan Koenen. The large study found that the genetic risk for PTSD is much higher for women than men. And it adds to evidence that mental ills such as schizophrenia share genetic links with PTSD, said Koenen, a professor of psychiatric epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health. Most people experience some level psychological distress after living through a severe or life-threatening experience. They may replay the event repeatedly in ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Diabetes, Type 2, Major Depressive Disorder, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Dementia, Psychiatric Disorders, Dysthymia, Diagnosis and Investigation

'Mindfulness' Probably Won't Cure Your Back Pain: Study

Posted 25 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 25, 2017 – Proponents of mindfulness-based stress reduction claim it can improve relationships, mental health, weight and more. But, one complaint it's unlikely to fix is lower back pain, researchers now say. Lower back pain doesn't respond to the programs, which embrace meditation, heightened self-awareness and exercise, according to a review of seven prior studies. Although short-term improvements were reported, "no clinical significance" was found in terms of overall pain or disability when mindfulness was compared to standard treatment, said study lead author Dennis Anheyer. Anheyer is a psychology research fellow in the faculty of medicine at the University of Duisburg-Essen in Germany. About eight out of 10 American adults will experience lower back pain at some point in their lives, according to the U.S. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Obesity, Back Pain, Sciatica, Herniated Disc, Psychiatric Disorders, Scoliosis, Radiculopathy

Just 1 in 5 Mentally Ill Women Gets Cervical Cancer Screenings

Posted 17 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 17, 2017 – Cervical cancer screening rates are much lower among women with severe mental illness than among other women, a new study finds. "The results of this very large study indicate that we need to better prioritize cervical cancer screening for these high-risk women with severe mental illnesses," said study senior author Dr. Christina Mangurian. She's an associate professor of clinical psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco. Researchers reviewed 2010-11 California Medicaid data for the study. Of the women with severe mental illness, 42 percent had some form of schizophrenia. Almost a third of the women had major depression. Nearly one in five had bipolar disorder, and the rest had anxiety or another disorder. The study showed that 20 percent of women with severe mental illness were screened for cervical cancer. But 42 percent of women in the ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Bipolar Disorder, Major Depressive Disorder, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Schizophrenia, Mania, Borderline Personality Disorder, Schizoaffective Disorder, Sexual Dysfunction, SSRI Induced, Autism, Psychosis, Psychiatric Disorders, Asperger Syndrome, Neurosis, Dissociative Identity Disorder, Body Dysmorphic Disorder, Neurotic Depression, Excoriation Disorder, Dependent Personality Disorder

Self-Harm Can Be a Harbinger of Suicide

Posted 31 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 31, 2017 – Adults who self-harm appear to be at increased risk for suicide over the next year, a new study suggests. "The patterns seen in this study suggest that clinical efforts should focus on ensuring the safety of individuals who survive deliberate self-harm during the first few months after such attempts – particularly when a violent method such as a firearm has been used," said senior study author Dr. Mark Olfson. He's a professor of psychiatry at Columbia University Medical Center in New York City. "For these patients, clinicians should strongly consider inpatient admission, intensive supervision and interventions targeting underlying mental disorders to reduce suicide risk. In addition, clinicians can encourage family members to install trigger locks or temporarily store firearms outside the patient's home," Olfson said in a university news release. The ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Alcohol Dependence, Psychiatric Disorders, Alcoholism, Aggressive Behavior

Climate Change May Cloud Americans' Mental Health: Report

Posted 30 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 30, 2017 – As the Trump Administration moves to undo certain climate change policies, a leading group of U.S. psychologists has issued a report that says warming trends and related extreme weather events could wreak havoc on mental health. "The impacts of climate change will not be restricted to those who are directly affected," said Susan Clayton, co-author of a new report from the American Psychological Association and the nonprofit ecoAmerica. Climate change presents "a far more widespread threat to our well-being through direct and indirect impacts on mental health," said Clayton, a professor of psychology at the College of Wooster in Ohio. The report draws attention to the physical effects of climate change, including lung and heart disease, malnutrition and increased risk for asthma and insect-borne diseases such as Zika. But the psychological effects may be ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Psychiatric Disorders, Dysthymia

A Lonely Heart Could Worsen a Cold

Posted 30 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 30, 2017 – A cold is never fun, but it's even more misery for folks who feel lonely, new research suggests. "We think this is important, particularly because of the economic burden associated with the common cold," said study co-author Angie LeRoy, a psychology graduate student at Rice University in Houston. "Millions of people miss work each year because of it. And that has to do with how they feel, not necessarily with how much they're blowing their noses," she said in a university news release. For the study, LeRoy and Rice psychologist Chris Fagundes used nose drops to deliberately infect a group of 159 volunteers with the cold virus. The participants were all unmarried and ranged from 18 to 55 years of age. Each also filled out standard psychological questionnaires aimed at assessing their feelings of social isolation. According to LeRoy, "Research has shown that ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Cold Symptoms, Psychiatric Disorders, Sore Throat, Dysthymia

Trauma as a Teen May Boost Depression Risk Around Menopause

Posted 29 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 29, 2017 – Women who suffered trauma and stress during their teens have a greater risk of depression during the years leading into menopause, a new study suggests. Depression is common during these midlife years, the period called perimenopause. But whether certain women might be at higher risk has been unclear. "Our results show that women who experience at least two adverse events during their formative years – whether it be abuse, neglect or some type of family dysfunction – are more than twice as likely to experience depression during perimenopause and menopause as women who either experienced those stressors earlier in life, or not at all," said lead author Dr. C. Neill Epperson. She's director of the Penn Center for Women's Behavioral Wellness at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine. "This suggests that not only does early life stress ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Menopausal Disorders, Postmenopausal Symptoms, Psychiatric Disorders, Dysthymia, Perimenopausal Symptoms

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