Skip to Content

Join the 'Psychiatric Disorders' group to help and get support from people like you.

Psychiatric Disorders News

Related terms: Mental Illness

Nearly 1 in 5 U.S. Adults Has Mental Illness or Drug Problem

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 21, 2017 – Nearly 1 in 5 American adults deals with a mental illness or substance abuse problem each year, a U.S. government study says. Oregon has the highest rate, and New Jersey the lowest, according to 2012-2014 data analyzed by the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). Overall, almost 44 million Americans 18 or older had a diagnosable mental, behavioral or emotional disorder in the past year, researchers said. They reviewed national surveys on drug use and health. "The figures in SAMHSA's report remind us how important it is to take mental health as seriously as any other health condition," Kana Enomoto, SAMHSA acting deputy assistant secretary, said in an agency news release. The overall national rate of mental illness was about 18 percent. In Oregon, almost 23 percent of the state residents had any type of mental illness. Utah, ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Bipolar Disorder, Oxycodone, Anxiety and Stress, Hydrocodone, Tramadol, Percocet, Methadone, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Major Depressive Disorder, Opiate Dependence, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab

Many People Can't Spot a Faked Photo, Study Finds

Posted 7 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 18, 2017 – In an era when the phrase "fake news" is on many lips, a new study suggests that people are terrible at detecting whether photos have been manipulated to misrepresent reality. "Our findings suggest that people have an extremely limited ability to distinguish between real and fake images," said study lead author Sophie Nightingale. She's a graduate student at the University of Warwick in England. "In fact, people perform close to chance when asked if a photo has been manipulated. This suggests that we can be easily fooled by fraudulent online news," Nightingale said. Photo manipulation is hardly new. Photographers and others have faked photos since the early days of photography. For example, fraudulent photos of ghosts and fairies became a fad in the late 19th century. But computer digital technology has taken photo manipulation to a higher level. "It's never ... Read more

Related support groups: Psychiatric Disorders, Visual Defect/Disturbance

Dying May Not Be as Awful an Experience as You Think

Posted 19 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 6, 2017 – Does the very idea of death worry and frighten you? There may be reassurance from a new study that finds those fears might be exaggerated. In fact, the research shows, death is often described as a peaceful, "unexpectedly positive" experience by those who approach it. Death is one of life's guarantees, yet it's something people often avoid talking about, according to study author Kurt Gray. He's an assistant professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. "There's almost an unspoken assumption that death is something to be avoided at all costs," Gray said. But his team found that the abstract concept of death may be scarier than the reality. To look at the question, the researchers first searched for blogs by people who were terminally ill with cancer or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, or Lou Gehrig's disease) – diseases where patients ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Cancer, Breast Cancer, Agitation, Colorectal Cancer, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Psychiatric Disorders, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

Getting Over Guilt

Posted 20 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 6, 2017 – Do you sometimes feel weighed down by guilt? Guilt over unethical behavior is so powerful that it can make you feel as though you've gained weight – even when your actual weight stays the same, according to a study by U.S. and Canadian researchers. Guilt is an important emotion. Appropriate guilt helps you recognize when you've made a mistake, and stops you from making the same mistake again. But sometimes we feel guilty even though we've done nothing wrong, and there is no misstep to think about or fix. If you're feeling guilty, figure out whether it's healthy and appropriate. If it is, the next step is to take action. The sooner you apologize or correct what you did wrong, the faster the guilt will go away. Once you've done this, it's important to recognize that you can't change the past – you need to let it go. As you move forward, try to learn from the ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Dysthymia, Psychiatric Disorders, Performance Anxiety

Slowed Walking, Shrinking Brain?

Posted 29 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 29, 2017 – It isn't unusual for older people to slow down a bit as the years go by. But for seniors, slowed walking may signal mental decline, and now a new study suggests why. "Typically when physicians notice a slowing gait in their patients, they'll consider it a mechanical issue and refer the patient to physical therapy," said study author Andrea Rosso. "What we're finding is that physicians also should consider that there may be a brain pathology driving the slowing gait and refer the patient for a cognitive [mental] evaluation," she added. Rosso is an assistant professor in the University of Pittsburgh's department of epidemiology For the study, the researchers looked at 175 people, aged 70 to 79, who had normal mental function at the start of the study period. The participants all had regular assessments over the course of 14 years. People who developed slowed ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Psychiatric Disorders, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Lewy Body Dementia

Poor Sleep May Worsen Suicidal Thoughts

Posted 28 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 28, 2017 – Sleep problems may provide early clues about worsening suicidal thoughts in at-risk young adults as well as a potential way to intervene, a new study suggests. "Suicide is the tragic outcome of psychiatric illness interacting with multiple biological, psychological and social risk factors," said lead author Rebecca Bernert. She is a suicidologist and assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences from Stanford University Medical School. "Sleep disturbances stand apart from other risk factors because they are visible as a warning sign, yet non-stigmatizing and highly treatable. This is why we believe they may represent an important treatment target in suicide prevention," she said in a university news release. How could sleep potentially prevent a suicide? "Sleep is a barometer of our well-being, and directly impacts how we feel the next day. We ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Bipolar Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Major Depressive Disorder, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Fatigue, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Schizophrenia, Mania, Borderline Personality Disorder, Dysthymia, Psychiatric Disorders, Drowsiness, Severe Mood Dysregulation, Cyclothymic Disorder, Hypersomnia

Michigan's Expanded Medicaid Plan a Boon for Workers

Posted 27 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 27, 2017 – Michigan's expanded Medicaid program not only improved low-income residents' health, but it helped them do their jobs better or get a new one. Those are the findings from a University of Michigan survey of nearly 4,100 Healthy Michigan Plan enrollees. Eighty percent of the respondents had incomes below the federal poverty level, and 28 percent were out of work. In the survey, nearly half the respondents said their physical health improved in the first year of coverage, and 40 percent said their mental or dental health got better. Sixty-nine percent of those who had jobs said they did better at work once they had health insurance. And 55 percent of those who were unemployed said coverage improved their ability to look for a job. Those who said their health improved after getting coverage were most likely to also report a positive effect on their work or job ... Read more

Related support groups: Oral and Dental Conditions, Psychiatric Disorders, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

Study Cites Top Reasons Young Autism Patients Are Hospitalized

Posted 16 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 16, 2017 – Having a mood disorder significantly boosts the odds that young people with autism will be hospitalized for psychiatric care, according to a new study. People with autism are often hospitalized when their behavior problems overwhelm their caregivers, the study authors said. "The demand is far greater than the number of clinicians, the number of programs and the number of beds we have," said study leader Giulia Righi. She is an assistant professor of psychiatry and human behavior research at Brown University's Warren Alpert Medical School. Righi's team reviewed records of 473 people with autism, aged 4 to 20. The risk of hospitalization was seven times higher for those with a mood disorder. In addition, sleep problems more than doubled the chances of a hospital stay. And those with high scores on a scale of autism symptom severity had a slightly increased risk, ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Bipolar Disorder, Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Social Anxiety Disorder, Mania, Borderline Personality Disorder, Autism, Psychiatric Disorders, Asperger Syndrome, Severe Mood Dysregulation, Body Dysmorphic Disorder, Cyclothymic Disorder, Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder

The Doctor Will (Virtually) See You Now

Posted 8 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 8, 2017 – Telemedicine is playing an ever-expanding role in the U.S. health care landscape. Among the reasons: a growing national shortage of doctors, both primary care and, in certain areas, specialists. And one-quarter of the population lives in rural areas without easy access to care. So, telemedicine has stepped in to help fill the gap. In fact, more than 10 million Americans now use it every year. Telemedicine, or telehealth, are terms for virtual office visits – video chats made through your smartphone, tablet or computer, sometimes with no waiting at all. You can see and speak with a doctor using real-time audio and video technology. Services can vary from getting a diagnosis and a prescription for minor medical issues, to ongoing monitoring of chronic conditions – especially helpful to older adults. Some health insurance providers now offer telehealth as part ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Skin Rash, Urinary Tract Infection, Bladder Infection, Upper Respiratory Tract Infection, Psychiatric Disorders, Skin and Structure Infection, Respiratory Tract Disease

Communication Problems Not at Root of Tantrums in Kids With Autism

Posted 31 May 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 31, 2017 – Children with autism spectrum disorders probably aren't throwing more tantrums because of a lack of ability to communicate, new research suggests. Speech and language problems are common in autism. Many children with autism aren't able to speak clearly. Some can't speak at all. But in this study, the researchers found that children with autism who have clear speech and a high ability to communicate have just as many outbursts as those who don't. "There is a common pervasive misbelief that children with autism have more tantrum behaviors because they have difficulty communicating their wants and their needs to caregivers and other adults," said lead research Dr. Cheryl Tierney. "The belief is that their inability to express themselves with speech and language is the driving force for these behaviors, and that if we can improve their speech and their language, ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Autism, Psychiatric Disorders, Asperger Syndrome

Teasing Teens About Weight May Do Lasting Harm

Posted 25 May 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 25, 2017 – Teens who are taunted about their weight may be more likely to become obese adults who struggle with poor body image, a new study finds. Researchers also found that teens who are bullied about their weight are more likely to become emotional eaters. Teen bullies often target peers' weight, but weight-based teasing can also occur at home. "Our findings suggest the need for broader anti-bullying initiatives that include both the school and family/home environments as targets for intervention," lead author Rebecca Puhl said in a University of Connecticut news release. Puhl is a professor and deputy director of the university's Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity. The researchers found that teens who face insults about their weight not only may be upset at the time, they may face serious long-term consequences, including obesity as well as unhealthy dieting and ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Obesity, Weight Loss, Psychiatric Disorders

City Life Tough on Teens' Mental Health

Posted 23 May 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 23, 2017 – City life seems to take a toll on the adolescent mind, new research suggests. The study included more than 2,000 18-year-olds in England and Wales who were interviewed about psychotic experiences (such as hearing voices and feeling extremely paranoid) since age 12. The research team from King's College London and Duke University found that teens raised in large cities were over 40 percent more likely to report psychotic experiences than those who grew up in rural areas. "These findings highlight the importance of early, preventative strategies for reducing psychosis risk and suggests that adolescents living in threatening neighborhoods within cities should be made a priority," said study co-senior author Helen Fisher. She is from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience at King's College. "If we intervene early enough – for example by offering ... Read more

Related support groups: Schizophrenia, Schizoaffective Disorder, Psychosis, Psychiatric Disorders, Depressive Psychosis, Drug Psychosis

Women Aren't Better at Reading People's Faces After All

Posted 19 May 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, May 19, 2017 – When it comes to spotting a familiar face, men are just as gifted as women, a new study suggests. The finding contradicts the widely held belief that women are better at recognizing faces and reading facial expressions than men are, the Penn State researchers said. "There has been common lore in the behavioral literature that women do better than men in many types of face-processing tasks, such as face recognition and detecting and categorizing facial expressions, although, when you look in the empirical literature, the findings are not so clear-cut," said researcher Suzy Scherf. She is an assistant professor of psychology and neuroscience. "I went into this work fully expecting to see an effect of biological sex on the part of the observer in facial recognition – and we did not find any. And we looked really hard," she added in a Penn State news release. Facial ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Bipolar Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Schizophrenia, Paranoid Disorder, Schizoaffective Disorder, Dysthymia, Psychiatric Disorders, Diagnosis and Investigation

What Harms the Young Heart Also Hurts the Brain Later

Posted 10 May 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 10, 2017 – High blood pressure, elevated cholesterol or a smoking habit early in life increases your odds for mental decline during middle age, a new study warns. "While it is well known that high blood pressure, cholesterol and smoking are associated with poor cognitive [mental] performance in adults, the effects of these risk factors from childhood on midlife cognition were unknown," study lead author Suvi Rovio said in a news release from the American College of Cardiology. "These findings support the need for active monitoring and treatment strategies against cardiovascular risk factors from childhood," said Rovio, a senior scientist at the University of Turku, in Finland. For the study, Rovio and colleagues analyzed data from thousands of people in Finland who were followed from childhood to adulthood. The investigators found that high blood pressure and high ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Smoking, High Cholesterol, Smoking Cessation, Psychiatric Disorders, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Reasons Why Parents Should Be Wary of '13 Reasons Why'

Posted 4 May 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 4, 2017 – It started as a bestselling novel aimed at teens. In 2007, Thirteen Reasons Why, by first-time novelist Jay Asher, outlined the story of a 16-year-old named Hannah Baker. In the book, Hannah recounts – from beyond the grave – the high school gossip, humiliation, bullying, invasion of privacy, betrayal and sexual assault that led her to suicide. In the spring of 2017, "13 Reasons Why" became an even more popular 13-episode series on Netflix. How popular? Netflix doesn't provide ratings. But in the month since it began streaming in its entirety, evidence of the series' wide reach can be seen in the young binge-watchers who've swamped social media to discuss the show. Twitter, for one, has already been deluged with 11 million series-related tweets. And that, says Variety magazine, makes the Netflix hit "the most tweeted-about show of 2017" so far. According to ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Dysthymia, Psychiatric Disorders

Page 1 2 3 ... Next

Ask a Question

Further Information

Related Condition Support Groups

Anxiety, Depression, Bipolar Disorder, Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Borderline Personality Disorder, Schizophrenia, Psychosis, Autism, view more... Agitation, Paranoid Disorder, Mental Retardation, Body Dysmorphic Disorder, Dissociative Identity Disorder, Intermittent Explosive Disorder, Neurosis, Aggressive Behavior, Dependent Personality Disorder, Eating Disorder