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Psychiatric Disorders News

Related terms: Mental Illness

Just 1 in 5 Mentally Ill Women Gets Cervical Cancer Screenings

Posted 7 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 17, 2017 – Cervical cancer screening rates are much lower among women with severe mental illness than among other women, a new study finds. "The results of this very large study indicate that we need to better prioritize cervical cancer screening for these high-risk women with severe mental illnesses," said study senior author Dr. Christina Mangurian. She's an associate professor of clinical psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco. Researchers reviewed 2010-11 California Medicaid data for the study. Of the women with severe mental illness, 42 percent had some form of schizophrenia. Almost a third of the women had major depression. Nearly one in five had bipolar disorder, and the rest had anxiety or another disorder. The study showed that 20 percent of women with severe mental illness were screened for cervical cancer. But 42 percent of women in the ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Bipolar Disorder, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Major Depressive Disorder, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Schizophrenia, Mania, Schizoaffective Disorder, Borderline Personality Disorder, Sexual Dysfunction, SSRI Induced, Psychosis, Autism, Psychiatric Disorders, Asperger Syndrome, Neurosis, Dissociative Identity Disorder, Body Dysmorphic Disorder, Neurotic Depression, Excoriation Disorder, Dependent Personality Disorder

Self-Harm Can Be a Harbinger of Suicide

Posted 31 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 31, 2017 – Adults who self-harm appear to be at increased risk for suicide over the next year, a new study suggests. "The patterns seen in this study suggest that clinical efforts should focus on ensuring the safety of individuals who survive deliberate self-harm during the first few months after such attempts – particularly when a violent method such as a firearm has been used," said senior study author Dr. Mark Olfson. He's a professor of psychiatry at Columbia University Medical Center in New York City. "For these patients, clinicians should strongly consider inpatient admission, intensive supervision and interventions targeting underlying mental disorders to reduce suicide risk. In addition, clinicians can encourage family members to install trigger locks or temporarily store firearms outside the patient's home," Olfson said in a university news release. The ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Alcohol Dependence, Alcoholism, Psychiatric Disorders, Aggressive Behavior

Climate Change May Cloud Americans' Mental Health: Report

Posted 30 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 30, 2017 – As the Trump Administration moves to undo certain climate change policies, a leading group of U.S. psychologists has issued a report that says warming trends and related extreme weather events could wreak havoc on mental health. "The impacts of climate change will not be restricted to those who are directly affected," said Susan Clayton, co-author of a new report from the American Psychological Association and the nonprofit ecoAmerica. Climate change presents "a far more widespread threat to our well-being through direct and indirect impacts on mental health," said Clayton, a professor of psychology at the College of Wooster in Ohio. The report draws attention to the physical effects of climate change, including lung and heart disease, malnutrition and increased risk for asthma and insect-borne diseases such as Zika. But the psychological effects may be ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Dysthymia, Psychiatric Disorders

A Lonely Heart Could Worsen a Cold

Posted 30 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 30, 2017 – A cold is never fun, but it's even more misery for folks who feel lonely, new research suggests. "We think this is important, particularly because of the economic burden associated with the common cold," said study co-author Angie LeRoy, a psychology graduate student at Rice University in Houston. "Millions of people miss work each year because of it. And that has to do with how they feel, not necessarily with how much they're blowing their noses," she said in a university news release. For the study, LeRoy and Rice psychologist Chris Fagundes used nose drops to deliberately infect a group of 159 volunteers with the cold virus. The participants were all unmarried and ranged from 18 to 55 years of age. Each also filled out standard psychological questionnaires aimed at assessing their feelings of social isolation. According to LeRoy, "Research has shown that ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Cold Symptoms, Sore Throat, Dysthymia, Psychiatric Disorders

Trauma as a Teen May Boost Depression Risk Around Menopause

Posted 29 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 29, 2017 – Women who suffered trauma and stress during their teens have a greater risk of depression during the years leading into menopause, a new study suggests. Depression is common during these midlife years, the period called perimenopause. But whether certain women might be at higher risk has been unclear. "Our results show that women who experience at least two adverse events during their formative years – whether it be abuse, neglect or some type of family dysfunction – are more than twice as likely to experience depression during perimenopause and menopause as women who either experienced those stressors earlier in life, or not at all," said lead author Dr. C. Neill Epperson. She's director of the Penn Center for Women's Behavioral Wellness at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine. "This suggests that not only does early life stress ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Menopausal Disorders, Postmenopausal Symptoms, Dysthymia, Psychiatric Disorders, Perimenopausal Symptoms

Teens With Autism More Likely to Land in ER, Study Finds

Posted 25 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 24, 2017 – U.S. teens with autism are four times more likely to visit an emergency room than those without the disorder, a new report says. The Penn State College of Medicine researchers said the likelihood of an ER visit for a teen with autism increased five-fold from 2005 to 2013. The findings suggest that young people with autism may require better access to primary and specialist care, the researchers said. "We believe if their regular medical and behavioral specialist services served them better, a big portion of them would end up with fewer emergency department visits," said study author Guodong Liu, an assistant professor of public health sciences at Penn State. In the United States, it's estimated that 1 in 68 children has an autism spectrum disorder. This is the term for a range of conditions that may involve problems with social skills, speech and nonverbal ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Autism, Psychiatric Disorders, Asperger Syndrome

Suicide Often Leaves Mental, Physical Woes in Surviving Spouse

Posted 22 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 22, 2017 – The loss of a spouse is never easy, but the loss of a spouse to suicide may be even more devastating, leading to a greater risk of a host of mental and physical problems, Danish researchers suggest. Surviving partners are more likely to develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, anxiety and other mood disorders. Surviving spouses are also at higher risk for suicide themselves, the study said. "It's a really distressing event for people," said lead researcher Annette Erlangsen, from the Danish Research Institute for Suicide Prevention at the Mental Health Centre in Copenhagen. "Being bereaved by suicide is stigmatized and it is something people don't talk about," Erlangsen said. "Surviving spouses may feel isolated, and other people may be more afraid of addressing it. It's important to deal with the loss, and part of that is talking to others ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Dysthymia, Psychiatric Disorders

Health Tip: Living With Social Phobia

Posted 20 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

-- It's common to get a bit anxious before a big event, but someone with social phobia gets extremely nervous about a job interview, reunion or giving a speech. The American Academy of Family Physicians says possible symptoms of social phobia include: Being very afraid of judgment or embarrassment in front of others. Feeling that all others are more capable and confident than you are. Blushing and sweating when faced with a social situation. Feeling nauseous, shaking or trembling before or during a social situation. Having a hard time speaking or making eye contact with others. Continuing to worry after an event about what people thought. Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Social Anxiety Disorder, Psychiatric Disorders, Performance Anxiety

Drinking, Drug Abuse Doubles Veterans' Suicide Risk: Study

Posted 17 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 17, 2017 – U.S. veterans with substance abuse problems have a higher risk of suicide than veterans who don't, new research suggests. The study looked at more than 4 million veterans, and found that drug or alcohol problems affected 8 percent of males and 3 percent of females. These veterans had a more than twofold increased risk of suicide compared with those without a substance use disorder. The suicide rate was especially high among female veterans with drug or alcohol problems. These women had a more than five times greater rate of suicide than female veterans who did not have substance abuse problems. "We hope these findings will help clinicians and health systems care for people with substance use disorders, with mental health conditions, and with both – and focus suicide prevention efforts accordingly," said lead study author Kipling Bohnert. Bohnert is an ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Bipolar Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Opiate Dependence, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Schizophrenia, Drug Dependence, Psychosis, Dysthymia, Psychiatric Disorders, Substance Abuse, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Depressive Psychosis

Patients Often Reject Drug-Only Psychiatric Treatment

Posted 6 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, March 6, 2017 – Mental health patients are more likely to reject treatment if it involves only drugs, a new study finds. Some experts believe talk therapy should be the first treatment option for many mental health disorders. The new finding – from a review of 186 prior studies – supports that stance, the researchers said. "Patients often desire an opportunity to talk with and work through their problems with a caring individual who might be able to help them better face their emotional experiences," said study co-author Roger Greenberg. He's a professor of psychology at the State University of New York's Upstate Medical University. Greenberg and his colleagues analyzed 186 studies of patients who sought help for mental health conditions. Overall, the average treatment refusal rate was more than 8 percent. Patients offered drug therapy alone were almost twice as likely to ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Bipolar Disorder, Panic Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Lexapro, Zoloft, Cymbalta, Effexor, Prozac, Major Depressive Disorder, Celexa, Seroquel, Citalopram, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Paxil, Sertraline, Abilify, Pristiq

Exercise Helps Counter Cancer-Linked Fatigue

Posted 3 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 2, 2017 – Whether from the disease itself or the treatment, cancer can be exhausting, but a new review says there are ways to beat back cancer-related fatigue. The review included a look at 113 past studies that included more than 11,000 adult cancer patients. The researchers found that exercise and/or behavioral and educational therapy seemed to be more effective than prescription drugs for dealing with fatigue. "Exercise and psychological treatment, and the combination of these two interventions, work the best for treating cancer-related fatigue – better than any pharmaceuticals we have tested," noted study lead author Karen Mustian. She's an associate professor with the University of Rochester Medical Center's Wilmot Cancer Institute in Rochester, N.Y. The upshot, said Mustian, is that doctors should consider exercise and psychological interventions as the ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Cancer, Fatigue, Psychiatric Disorders

Who's Top Dog When It Comes to 'Social Intelligence'? Kids or Pets?

Posted 1 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 28, 2017 – Your pooch or your toddler – who's the most "socially intelligent"? The answer could be a toss-up, a new study suggests. For the study, researchers used a series of tests to assess the ability of dogs, 2-year-old children and chimpanzees to do various types of thinking. The dogs and toddlers did much better than the chimps on tests of cooperative communication skills, such as the ability to follow a human gaze or a pointing finger. Scientists believe these basic social skills that begin to develop in infancy are what seem to set humans apart from other species, study author Evan MacLean explained. "There's been a lot of research showing that you don't really find those same social skills in chimpanzees, but you do find them in dogs, so that suggested something superficially similar between dogs and kids," said MacLean. He is director of the University of ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Social Anxiety Disorder, Psychiatric Disorders

Study Links Psychiatric Disorders to Stroke Risk

Posted 24 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 23, 2017 – Getting care at a hospital for a psychiatric disorder may be linked to a higher risk of stroke in the following weeks and months, new research suggests. People who sought care at a hospital for serious mental health conditions – such as depression, anxiety or post-traumatic stress disorder – faced a tripled risk of stroke following their visit, the study authors contended. The risk started to decrease after 30 days, but remained twice as high for at least a year after the ER visit or hospital stay, the researchers said. "We have known for some time that people who have a stroke seem to be at an increased risk for later on developing some sort of psychiatric illness, depression or post-stroke psychosis," said study lead author Jonah Zuflacht. He's a fourth-year medical student at Columbia University's College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City. "But ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, High Blood Pressure, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Hypertension, Ischemic Stroke, Transient Ischemic Attack, Dysthymia, Psychiatric Disorders

No, Your Cat Isn't a Threat to Your Mental Health

Posted 22 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 21, 2017 – Cat owners can breathe a sigh of relief: Your feline's litter box likely won't put your family's mental health at risk. New British research challenges earlier beliefs that parasites in cat droppings might be linked to schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder and other mental health issues. "The message for cat owners is clear: There is no evidence that cats pose a risk to children's mental health," said study author Dr. Francesca Solmi, of University College London Psychiatry. Cats are carriers of an infectious parasite called Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii). They may pass this infection on to humans through their feces. The researchers behind this study wanted to know if contact with cats during childhood raised risk for mental illness. To find out, the researchers followed nearly 5,000 people born in the early 1990s until they were 18 years old. ... Read more

Related support groups: Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Schizophrenia, Psychosis, Psychiatric Disorders, Toxoplasmosis, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Toxoplasmosis - Prophylaxis

'Love Hormone' Helps Dads and Babies Bond

Posted 17 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Feb. 17, 2017 – The "love hormone" oxytocin may program fathers to bond with their young children, a new study suggests. "Our findings add to the evidence that fathers, and not just mothers, undergo hormonal changes that are likely to facilitate increased empathy and motivation to care for their children," said study lead author James Rilling of Emory University in Atlanta. Oxytocin is a naturally occurring hormone. MRI brain scans revealed that dads who received boosts of the hormone through a nasal spray had increased activity in brain areas associated with reward and empathy when looking at pictures of their toddlers, Rilling's team said. The findings also "suggest that oxytocin, known to play a role in social bonding, might someday be used to normalize deficits in paternal motivation, such as in men suffering from post-partum depression," Rilling said in a university news ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Postpartum Depression, Dysthymia, Delivery, Psychiatric Disorders, Oxytocin, Premature Labor, Pitocin, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Syntocinon, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy

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