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Obstructive Sleep Apnea / Hypopnea Syndrome News

Health Tip: Better Sleep, a Better Life

Posted 2 days 22 hours ago by Drugs.com

-- Sleep quality affects the quality of your life, both physically and emotionally. The National Sleep Foundation says getting enough quality sleep helps you: Improve your ability to learn and focus. Feel happier and less cranky. Improve productivity. Feel less hungry. Improve your risk of infection and chronic illness. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Nightmares, Drowsiness, Sleep Apnea, Narcolepsy, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Night Terrors, Hypersomnia, Insomnia - Stimulant-Associated, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Jet Lag, Alcohol-Induced Sleep Disorder, REM Sleep Behavior Disorder

Don't Give Kids Medicines With Codeine, Tramadol: FDA

Posted 10 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 20, 2017 – Parents shouldn't give their children any medications containing the narcotics codeine or tramadol, because they can cause life-threatening breathing problems, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned Thursday. Warning labels on medications with codeine or tramadol will be strengthened to reflect these potential dangers, the FDA said in a statement. Nursing mothers should also avoid using these drugs, since they can pass unsafe levels of opioids to their babies through their breast milk, the agency said. Children's bodies tend to process opioids more quickly than most adults, due to their smaller size. That can cause the level of narcotics in their bloodstream to rise too high and too quickly, risking overdose, the agency explained. Tramadol is a prescription drug that is only approved for adults to treat pain, the agency noted. Codeine products are ... Read more

Related support groups: Oxycodone, Surgery, Obesity, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Tramadol, OxyContin, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Opana, Subutex, Dilaudid, Opana ER, Roxicodone, MS Contin, Butrans, Ultram, Hydromorphone, Nucynta

Good Sleep Does Get Tougher With Age

Posted 5 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 5, 2017 – Most people see their sleep habits shift as they age, but a new review suggests that some seniors lose the ability to get deep, restorative rest. And that can come with health consequences, said review author Bryce Mander, a sleep researcher at the University of California, Berkeley. Sleep "fragmentation" has been linked to a number of medical conditions, including depression and dementia, Mander said. People with fragmented sleep wake up multiple times during the night, and miss out on the deep stages of sleep. It is true that medical conditions, or the treatments for them, can cause sleep problems, according to Mander. But poor sleep can also contribute to disease, he added. Take dementia, for example. Research suggests there is a "bi-directional" link between sleep disruptions and the dementia process, said Joe Winer, another Berkeley researcher who worked ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Major Depressive Disorder, Fatigue, Dementia, Dysthymia, Sleep Apnea, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome

Curbing Sleep Apnea Might Mean Fewer Night Trips to Bathroom

Posted 27 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, March 27, 2017 – Millions of Americans battle bothersome nighttime conditions, such as sleep apnea or the need to get up frequently to urinate. Now, new research suggests that treating the former condition with CPAP "mask" therapy might also help ease the latter. "This is the first study to show the true incidence of nocturia – peeing at night – in patients who suffer from obstructive sleep apnea. It's also the first study to show the size of the effect of positive pressure mask treatment [CPAP] in patients with obstructive sleep apnea on their nocturia symptoms," said lead researcher Sajjad Rahnama'i, of Maastricht University Medical Center in the Netherlands. Rahnama'i presented his team's findings Sunday at the European Association of Urology (EAU) annual meeting in London. One U.S. apnea expert who reviewed the new findings said apnea and nighttime overactive bladder ... Read more

Related support groups: Overactive Bladder, Urinary Incontinence, Sleep Apnea, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Primary Nocturnal Enuresis

Need More Zzzzz's?

Posted 25 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 24, 2017 – A good night's sleep is often elusive, but there are things you can do to boost the odds of getting some quality shuteye, sleep experts say. The first is to have regular bed and wake times, according to NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital sleep doctors Dr. Daniel Barone and Dr. Andrew Westwood. The doctors suggested going to sleep at the same time each night and waking up at the same time each morning, even on weekends and vacation days. That's because changes between workdays and days off may impair your sleep and how you feel during the daytime. Avoid caffeine in the late afternoon and evening, they advised. Instead of coffee, tea, cola and chocolate, choose water, seltzer, unsweetened decaffeinated herbal tea and other caffeine-free beverages. It's also important to eat a healthy diet and be physically active. "Regular exercise and maintaining a healthy diet that ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Nightmares, Caffeine, Fioricet, Excedrin, Sleep Apnea, Alert, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Fiorinal, Excedrin Migraine, Cafergot, Esgic, Stay Awake, Keep Going, Fiorinal with Codeine, Norgesic, Headache Relief, Fioricet with Codeine

Your DNA May Determine How You Handle the Time Change

Posted 13 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, March 11, 2017 – Some people have more trouble adjusting to daylight saving time than others and genes may be the reason why, says an expert on sleep/wake patterns. The time change occurs 2 a.m. Sunday morning when clocks "spring ahead" one hour. "It is likely that advancing our clocks in the spring would more affect owls, those individuals who tend to stay awake later at night and consequently wake up later in the morning," said Dr. Joseph Takahashi. "Less affected are the larks, those individuals who tend to wake up early and go to sleep earlier," he added. Takahashi is chairman of neuroscience at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. "Since being an owl or a lark is in large part genetically influenced, the best way to deal with daylight saving time is to be self-aware of your chronotype (early versus late awakening and sleeping) and to realize that advancing your ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Sleep Disorders, Anxiety and Stress, Insomnia, Fatigue, Sleep Apnea, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Alcohol-Induced Sleep Disorder

Health Tip: Too Much Sugar May Impact Sleep

Posted 10 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Shedding extra sugar from your diet may help you get a more restful night's sleep. The National Sleep Foundation advises: Too much sugar may raise your risk of waking during the night. Your energy may crash well after a high-sugar treat, prompting you to feel drowsy during the day. Avoid refined sugars found in many cereals, juices, desserts, white bread, sodas and white pasta. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Obesity, Insomnia, Fatigue, Sleep Apnea, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome

Genes Plus Erratic Sleep May Raise Odds for Obesity

Posted 10 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 10, 2017 – Yet more evidence of a link between poor sleep and excess weight: A new study finds that people who are genetically prone to obesity are more likely to be overweight if they have unusual sleep habits. "These data show that in people with high genetic risk for obesity, sleeping for too short or too long a time, napping during the day, and shift work appears to have a fairly substantial adverse influence on body weight," said researcher Dr. Jason Gill of the University of Glasgow, Scotland. Gill, who is with the university's Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, and colleagues looked at statistics on nearly 120,000 people in the United Kingdom. The investigators said they found that sleeping fewer than 7 hours a night or more than 9 hours a night boosts the risk of obesity among those who are especially prone to it because of their genes. Among those ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Obesity, Insomnia, Fatigue, Nightmares, Drowsiness, Sleep Apnea, Narcolepsy, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Hypersomnia, Insomnia - Stimulant-Associated, Diagnosis and Investigation, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Non-24-Hour Sleep Wake Disorder, REM Sleep Behavior Disorder, Alcohol-Induced Sleep Disorder

Do 'Early Birds' Get the Healthier Worm?

Posted 3 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 3, 2017 – Early birds may have a leg up over night owls when it comes to health and weight, new research suggests. Investigators in Finland found that morning people tend to eat better and earlier in the day than late-to-bed types. The result: a higher risk of obesity for the night owls, said study lead author Mirkka Maukonen, of the National Institute for Health and Welfare in Helsinki. "We found that night owls had postponed timing of food intake, and less favorable eating patterns with higher intakes of sucrose, fat and saturated fat in the evening hours than early birds," said Maukonen, a doctoral candidate in the department of public health solutions. Sucrose is a type of sugar. Registered dietitian Lona Sandon, of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, wasn't surprised by the findings. She said physiology and biology likely play a role. "Past ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Obesity, Insomnia, Fatigue, Sleep Apnea, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Night Terrors, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome

What Guides Docs' Sleeping Pill Picks? 'Same Old Same Old,' Study Says

Posted 1 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 28, 2017 – When it comes to sleeping pill prescriptions, doctors often stick to the same old routine, a new study suggests. "Our results illuminate the notion that just as everyone else, many physicians are creatures of habit who tend to rely on cognitive shortcuts in their decision-making," said study first author Andrew Beam. He's a postdoctoral researcher at Harvard Medical School's department of biomedical informatics in Boston. "Doctors are not always as rational as we'd like to believe," Beam added in a Harvard news release. People with insomnia have difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep. The condition is believed to affect up to 40 percent of Americans, but is underdiagnosed and poorly treated, the researchers said. Hoping to better understand what guides doctors' prescribing practices, Beam and his colleagues analyzed the medical records, including clinical ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Major Depressive Disorder, Ambien, Trazodone, Fatigue, Zolpidem, Drowsiness, Dysthymia, Sleep Apnea, Ambien CR, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Hypersomnia, Insomnia - Stimulant-Associated, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Intermezzo, Oleptro, Edluar, Desyrel

Health Tip: Learn Your Prime Sleep Time

Posted 27 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Your sleep schedule doesn't have to be determined by family, work and social commitments. You can figure out optimal bed and wake times that afford the best, most restful sleep. The National Sleep Foundation suggests: Figure out what time you need to wake up each morning, and count backwards to figure out when you should head to bed. Seven-to-nine hours of sleep is optimal. Consider your circadian rhythm. Figure out whether you tend to be most alert in the morning or at night, so you can adjust your sleep schedule to your body's needs. An ideal bedtime for most people is between 8 p.m. and 12 a.m. Adjust your bedtime based on whether you're waking up before your alarm in the morning, or struggling to fall asleep within 20 minutes. Stick to the same sleep schedule on weekends. Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Sleep Disorders, Klonopin, Insomnia, Clonazepam, Ativan, Valium, Fatigue, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, Diazepam, Temazepam, Librium, Restoril, Xanax XR, Sleep Apnea, Oxazepam, Halcion, Serax, Triazolam

Is Need for More Sleep a Sign of Pending Dementia?

Posted 23 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 – Seniors who begin sleeping more than nine hours a night may face a higher risk of dementia down the road, a new study suggests. The researchers estimated that the risk of dementia grew by almost 2.5 times for those who found themselves recently needing extra sleep. The chances of dementia rose sixfold for people without a high school degree who suddenly needed to sleep nine hours or more, the study contended. The study authors said this finding hinted that education might somehow offer a bit of protection from dementia. People with dementia often suffer from disrupted sleep, "but we don't know much about whether these changes come first," said study co-author Matthew Pase. He's a neurology fellow at the Boston University School of Medicine. Dementia "is by no means a certain fate" in those who find themselves sleeping longer as they age, Pase said. The new ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Drowsiness, Sleep Apnea, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Hypersomnia, Diagnosis and Investigation, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Lewy Body Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia

Health Tip: Short on Sleep?

Posted 22 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

-- It may be tough to find enough hours to get everything checked off of your daily to-do list. But giving up sleep to get more done may do more harm than good. The National Sleep Foundation explains how insufficient sleep affects you: Reduces cognitive function, making it more difficult to remember, focus, learn new things, solve problems and make decisions. Increases body's reaction to stress. Brings on feelings of irritability and moodiness. Reduces reaction time, affecting school or work performance and raising your risk of a car accident. Increases risk of developing high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease. Makes you more susceptible to illness. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Nightmares, Drowsiness, Sleep Apnea, Narcolepsy, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Hypersomnia, Insomnia - Stimulant-Associated, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Jet Lag, Alcohol-Induced Sleep Disorder

Skimp on Sleep and You Just May Wind Up Sick

Posted 9 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 9, 2017 – Ever noticed that when you try to "do it all," the one thing you can count on is getting sick? Now, a new study suggests why: if you don't get enough sleep, your immune system seems to suffer. The finding comes from a study of 11 pairs of twin adults. Each pair of twins had significantly different sleeping routines. The researchers found that the twin who regularly slept less also turned out to be the one with the less potent immune system. "This is the first study to show suppressed immune gene expression in chronic sleep deprivation," said study lead author Dr. Nathaniel Watson. He's a professor of neurology at the University of Washington Medicine Sleep Center in Seattle. That, added Watson, could explain why prior research has shown that "if you expose a sleep-deprived person to a rhinovirus they are more likely to get the common cold than a person who has ... Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Sleep Disorders, Klonopin, Insomnia, Clonazepam, Ativan, Valium, Fatigue, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, Diazepam, Temazepam, Cold Symptoms, Librium, Restoril, Xanax XR, Sleep Apnea, Sore Throat, Oxazepam, Immunosuppression

Health Tip: For Better Sleep, Watch What You Eat

Posted 6 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Diet plays a significant role in your health, including how well you sleep. The National Sleep Foundation explains: Eating too much saturated fat and too little fiber can affect how well you sleep. Consuming too much sugar can make it more likely that you'll wake up in the middle of the night. Avoiding food and drinks that are spicy, greasy, sugary or alcoholic can reduce your risk of sleep-interrupting heartburn. Getting more B vitamin-rich foods, such as dairy, eggs, meat, poultry and fish, can regulate melatonin and help stabilize your sleep. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Obesity, Insomnia, Fatigue, Drowsiness, Sleep Apnea, Alcoholism, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Hypersomnia, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome

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