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Neuropathic Pain News

Specially Designed Video Game Might Ease 'Phantom Limb' Pain

Posted 5 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 1, 2016 – Amputees who experience what is known as phantom limb pain may benefit from playing a virtual reality game that simulates the movement of missing limbs, a small study suggests. "Phantom limb pain is a difficult condition to treat that can seriously hinder patients' quality of life," said study lead author Max Ortiz Catalan. He is an assistant professor at Sweden's Chalmers University of Technology. Phantom limb pain occurs when amputees feel painful sensations that appear to be coming from limbs that no longer exist. In about one-third of cases, the pain can lead to poor mental health and worsening disability, the study authors noted. "The results from our study suggest that it may be useful to 'exercise' the phantom limb," Catalan explained. "Our treatment offers an engaging way to do this while also providing a non-invasive and non-pharmacological treatment, ... Read more

Related support groups: Neuropathic Pain, Periodic Limb Movement Disorder, Spinal Cord Trauma, Autonomic Neuropathy, Central Nervous System Disorders, Upper Limb Spasticity, Lower Limb Spasticity

Doctors Try Brain-Training to Curb 'Phantom Limb Pain'

Posted 28 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 – People who undergo an amputation often experience pain and sensation from the limb that's no longer there, a phenomenon doctors call "phantom limb pain." Researchers now say they've figured out a way to rewire the brain and reduce pain coming from a phantom limb, according to a new study. The technique essentially involves distracting the brain from mixed signals it may receive as a result of losing the limb, said co-author Ben Seymour. He's a neuroscientist with the Department of Engineering at the University of Cambridge in England. Phantom pain occurs in about half of patients who have either lost a limb or have lost nervous system contact with the limb, said Seymour, who worked on this project with researchers from Osaka University in Japan. A popular theory holds that people experience phantom pain because the part of the brain responsible for sensing and ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Chronic Pain, Neuralgia, Neuropathic Pain

Health Tip: When a Child Complains of Back Pain

Posted 25 May 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Back pain is not typical in children, and can signal something more serious. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons says your child should see a doctor if your child complains of back pain along with any of these additional symptoms: Losing weight, or running a fever. Having weakness or numbness. Having difficulty walking. Having pain that travels down both legs. Developing trouble with the bladder or bowels. Having pain that interferes with sleep. Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Back Pain, Neuralgia, Sciatica, Neuropathic Pain, Scoliosis, Pain/Fever

Freezing Technique May Ease 'Phantom Limb' Pain for Amputees

Posted 8 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, April 8, 2016 – A freezing technique may reduce the debilitating phantom limb pain that many amputees experience, according to a new, small study. Chronic pain that emanates from the site of a severed limb can be reduced in some cases when the remaining nerve and scar tissue is frozen in place, researchers said. The minimally invasive technique, known as cryoablation therapy, may offer hope to the roughly 200,000 Americans who undergo an amputation every year, according to U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention statistics. Many such patients, including military veterans and people with diabetes, experience a crippling form of nervous system disorientation after losing a limb. The study authors said the problem stems from inaccurate signaling among the remaining limb nerve endings and/or overactivity among neighboring nerves. The result is a distinct feeling of limb ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Chronic Pain, Neuralgia, Neuropathic Pain, Meralgia Paresthetica

Painkillers Don't Ease Disability Due to Nerve Damage: Study

Posted 1 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 1, 2016 – Taking prescription narcotic painkillers doesn't improve movement or reduce disability in people with pain related to nerve damage, researchers have found. "Even though [narcotic] medications can be a powerful pain killer, it does not necessarily mean improved function will follow. Pain is not the only factor in determining function," study lead author and pain expert Geoff Bostick, an associate professor of physical therapy at the University of Alberta in Canada, said in a university news release. The research included almost 800 patients with pain due to nerve damage, from causes such as diabetes and pinched nerves. Some were prescribed narcotic painkillers – such as morphine, codeine and Tylenol 3 – while others didn't receive the drugs. At 6-month and 12-month follow-ups, those who took the painkillers didn't show greater improvements in movement and ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Oxycodone, Fibromyalgia, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, Tramadol, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Tylenol, Chronic Pain, Opana, Neuralgia, Subutex

Did Painkiller Crackdown Cause Heroin Epidemic?

Posted 13 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13, 2016 – Top U.S. drug researchers are challenging a leading theory about the nation's heroin epidemic, saying it's not a direct result of the crackdown on prescription painkillers such as OxyContin and Vicodin. The commentary, published in the Jan. 14 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, is unlikely to resolve the debate, as other researchers disagree with the authors' conclusion. What they likely will agree on is that heroin's popularity is soaring – with more than 914,000 reported users in the United States in 2014, an increase of 145 percent since 2007, according to background notes with the commentary. This has led to a spike in overdose deaths – more than 10,500 in 2014. Some researchers and health officials point to recent limits on prescription painkillers as a likely cause of the heroin scourge. But the commentary authors said that the rise in ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Oxycodone, Back Pain, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, Tramadol, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Chronic Pain, Muscle Pain, Opana, Subutex, Dilaudid

25 Million U.S. Adults Struggle With Daily Pain

Posted 18 Aug 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 18, 2015 – Pain is widespread in much of America, with more than 25 million adults – 11 percent – suffering on a daily basis, a new national survey reveals. And approximately 14 million adults – roughly 6.4 percent – experience severe pain, which can be associated with poorer health and disability, researchers found. Other national studies of chronic pain have yielded similar results, said study author Richard Nahin, an epidemiologist with the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health at the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH). "What makes this study unique is that I also looked at how often adults have mild pain," he said. Nahin found that about 54 million adults – nearly one-quarter – reported "mild," but not incapacitating, pain. Whether pain is increasing nationally is difficult to say, Nahin said. But the good news is that roughly half of ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Fibromyalgia, Back Pain, Chronic Pain, Muscle Pain, Sciatica, Neck Pain, Neuropathic Pain, Knee Joint Replacement, Scoliosis, Nocturnal Leg Cramps, Frozen Shoulder, Postoperative Pain, Breakthrough Pain, Pain/Fever, Somatoform Pain Disorder

Steroids No Better for Sciatica Pain Than Placebo, Study Finds

Posted 19 May 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 19, 2015 – Doctors often prescribe steroid pills to ease the discomfort of sciatica – back and leg pain usually caused by a herniated disk in the lower back. But a new study finds steroids are no more effective than a placebo pill for the pain and provide only modest improvement in function. Sciatica affects about one in 10 people in their lifetime, the researchers said. For this study, 269 people with sciatica were randomly assigned to take an oral steroid (prednisone) or a placebo (a dummy medication) for 15 days. The participants were followed for up to a year. "When we compared the prednisone to placebo, there was a modest improvement in function," said study researcher Dr. Harley Goldberg, director of spine care services at Kaiser Permanente San Jose Medical Center in California. People reported they could go about their daily activities somewhat better than before. ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Back Pain, Prednisone, Chronic Pain, Neuralgia, Methylprednisolone, Sciatica, Prednisolone, Hydrocortisone, Neuropathic Pain, Medrol, Cortisone, Dexamethasone, Triamcinolone, Betamethasone, Budesonide, Decadron, Entocort, Breakthrough Pain, Solu-Medrol

Study Links Celiac Disease to Nerve Damage

Posted 11 May 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 11, 2015 – People with the digestive disorder celiac disease are at increased risk for nerve damage, a new study suggests. Swedish researchers looked at more than 28,000 people with celiac disease and a "control" group of more than 139,000 without the disorder. The researchers found that those with celiac disease were 2.5 times more likely to be diagnosed with nerve damage, medically known as neuropathy. However, the risk of nerve damage among the study patients was still low and the association seen in the study did not prove a cause-and-effect relationship. The study was published online May 11 in the journal JAMA Neurology. "We found an increased risk of neuropathy in patients with celiac disease that persists after celiac disease diagnosis," Dr. Jonas Ludvigsson, of the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, and colleagues wrote. "Although absolute risks for neuropathy are ... Read more

Related support groups: Peripheral Neuropathy, Neuropathic Pain, Celiac Disease, Small Fiber Neuropathy

Spinal Stimulation System Relieves Pain Without Tingling

Posted 11 May 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 11, 2015 – The Senza spinal cord stimulation system has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat chronic back pain without the tingling sensation that characterizes more traditional pain-relieving methods. The implanted device uses high-frequency stimulation to avoid the tingling sensation known as "paresthesia," the agency said in a news release. Spinal pain could be characterized by conditions including failed back surgery syndrome, low back pain and leg pain. Before treatment with Senza begins, potential users are treated with a trial system for a week or two, the FDA said. Once a physician determines that the trial device has worked, patients have minimally invasive surgery to implant Senza in the upper buttocks or abdomen. The device includes a patient-operated remote control. Senza's safety and effectiveness were clinically evaluated in a study ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Oxycodone, Back Pain, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, Tramadol, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Chronic Pain, Opana, Ibuprofen, Subutex, Naproxen

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