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Health Tip: Control a Bleeding Wound

Posted 9 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Rinsing a wound with cold water helps clean it, but it may not be enough to prevent infection. Bleeding is the body's natural way of cleansing a wound. Then again, too much bleeding isn't healthy either. Here's how to stop heavy bleeding, courtesy of the American Academy of Family Physicians: If available, use a sterile or clean piece of cloth, gauze or tissue. Hold the material over the wound, gently applying pressure. Have another piece of clean material on hand. If the bleeding soaks the first piece, apply another clean piece on top, but don't remove the first piece. Hold the clean material in place for another 20 minutes with firm pressure. Raise a bleeding leg or arm above the level of your heart. Read more

Related support groups: Bleeding Disorder, Scrapes, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Wound Cleansing, Minor Cuts, Minor Skin Conditions, Wound Debridement

Health Tip: Using Kitchen Knives

Posted 18 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

-- While you're tackling many tasks at once in the kitchen, a slip of a knife can lead to serious and permanent injury. The National Food Service Management Institute recommends: Avoiding any distractions and focusing solely on cutting food. Making sure blades are kept sharp. Choosing a knife that's an appropriate size for the job, and avoiding a kitchen knife for any reason other than cutting food. Avoiding holding food in your hand as you cut. Holding the knife only on top of the blade. Keeping knives away from the edge of a countertop or table. Promptly washing knives, drying them and storing them in a knife drawer or rack. Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Minor Cuts

Health Tip: Protect Your Hands While Gardening

Posted 26 May 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Digging and weeding can pose dangers for your hands, so use caution while working in your garden. The American Society for Surgery of the Hand suggests these precautions: Wear a pair of leather gloves to protect hands from bites, scratches, blisters, poison ivy, chemicals, fertilizers, bacteria and sunburn. Perform a different task every 15 minutes to avoid repetitive use of the same muscles. Such tasks include: raking, digging, planting, trimming or pruning. Use a small hand shovel to dig, to avoid cuts from buried debris. Make sure any sharp tool has a safety lock. Only use such as tool as intended. Practice proper body posture. And make sure your wrists are relaxed and straight (not bent) for maximum strength. Avoid tools with grooves on the handles that are meant to improve grip. If such tools don't fit your hand, they can lead to soreness and calluses. Read more

Related support groups: Onychomycosis - Toenail, Onychomycosis - Fingernail, Onychomycosis, Scrapes, Minor Cuts, Minor Skin Conditions, Minor Skin Irritation

Retail Prices of Dermatology Drugs Skyrocket

Posted 25 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 25, 2015 – Patients using prescription creams, gels, sprays and pills for skin conditions may shell out substantially more at the pharmacy than they did just six years ago, a new study suggests. Between 2009 and 2015, retail prices of brand-name dermatologic drugs rose 401 percent, on average, study authors reported Nov. 25 in JAMA Dermatology. Even generics have succumbed to price inflation, up 279 percent between 2011 and 2014, based on the drugs surveyed. Price increases for skin treatments far outpaced the general inflation rate of 11 percent during the six-year study period, the researchers said. "Cancer drugs were the worst in terms of the numbers" – up 1,240 percent or nearly $11,000 over the six-year study period – primarily because of two medicines, said Dr. Steven Rosenberg, voluntary professor of dermatology at the University of Miami Miller School of ... Read more

Related support groups: Monistat, RID, Monistat 3, Eczema, Voltaren Gel, Monistat 7, Dermatitis, Clobetasol, Contact Dermatitis, Bactroban, Mupirocin, Therapeutic, Maintain, Hypercare, Drysol, Sulfur, Fluocinonide, Retin-A, Efudex, Epiduo

Health Tip: Minimize Scarring

Posted 19 Aug 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Minor wounds and surgical scars should heal themselves, but there are things you can do to minimize scarring. The American Academy of Dermatology recommends: Use gentle soap and water to clean the area. Apply a bit of petroleum jelly to keep the skin moist. Use an adhesive bandage to cover a wound after it has been washed and protected with petroleum jelly. Change the bandage daily. Follow your doctor's recommendations for wounds that needed stitches. Once the skin has healed, protect it with sunscreen. Read more

Related support groups: Skin and Structure Infection, Keloids, Scrapes, Minor Cuts, Wound Cleansing, Wound Debridement, Minor Skin Conditions

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