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Good Diet, Exercise While Pregnant Could Cut C-section Risk

Posted 2 days 1 hour ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 19, 2017 – Eating a healthy diet and exercising during pregnancy isn't just good for the developing baby. A new analysis of 36 studies including a total of more than 12,500 women suggests these behaviors can also lower a mom-to-be's chances of having a Cesarean-section delivery or developing diabetes while pregnant. Overall, healthy habits reduced the risk of needing a C-section by about 10 percent, said study author Shakila Thangaratinam. She's a professor of maternal and perinatal health at Queen Mary University of London. A healthy lifestyle also reduced a woman's risk of developing diabetes during pregnancy – known as gestational diabetes – by 24 percent, the findings showed. Not surprisingly, healthy habits also trimmed the possibility of excess weight gain during pregnancy. "Based on all the evidence to date, what we found was a healthy diet and moderate ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Emergency Contraception, Postcoital Contraception, Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Cervical Ripening, Apnea of Prematurity, Cesarean Section, Labor Pain, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Widening 'Race Gap' in U.S. Infant Deaths

Posted 18 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 3, 2017 – The death rate for black infants in the United States has risen in recent years, while the rate for white infants continues to decline, a new study finds. "The sustained progress in reducing infant mortality among black infants since 2005 has stalled in the past few years. This has led to increases in the absolute inequality in infant mortality between black and white infants during the past three years," said a team led by Corinne Riddell of McGill University in Montreal. One U.S. pediatrician who reviewed the findings said it's unclear why this racial gap in infant deaths is widening. "Infant mortality and racial disparities in this outcome are very complex phenomena, and seem to involve both medical care access and other social factors," said Dr. Michael Grosso, chair of pediatrics at Huntington Hospital in Huntington, N.Y. "We should also wonder whether the ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Postpartum Bleeding, Apnea of Prematurity, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Another Reason to Breast-Feed: It's Good for Baby's Belly

Posted 8 May 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 8, 2017 – Mothers have been told for years that breast-feeding is best. Now researchers say they've found a new way it helps babies – by planting good bacteria in their digestive system. For the study, the researchers assessed 107 breast-feeding mother-infant pairs. The investigators found that 30 percent of beneficial bacteria in a baby's intestinal tract comes directly from the mother's milk, and 10 percent comes from skin on the mother's breast. "Breast milk is this amazing liquid that, through millions of years of evolution, has evolved to make babies healthy, particularly their immune systems," said senior study author Grace Aldrovandi. She is a professor of pediatrics and chief of infectious diseases at UCLA's Mattel Children's Hospital. "Our research identifies a new mechanism that contributes to building stronger, healthier babies," she explained in a UCLA news ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor Induction, Postpartum Bleeding, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Lactation Augmentation

Home Birth Safe for Some, But Not All, Women

Posted 21 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, April 21, 2017 – Some women really want to give birth at home, but for certain moms-to-be that choice can be risky, a new study suggests. There are women who have issues that can increase risks in pregnancy but are still likely to have good outcomes delivering at home or in a birth center. Those issues include being over 35, being overweight or having already had a vaginal birth after a cesarean delivery, the researchers said. Not so for women with other risk factors, such as breech presentation (when the baby is coming out feet first), as well as women attempting their first vaginal birth after cesarean, who may fare worse trying to deliver outside a hospital. In fact, the study found the risk of fetal death was eight to 10 times higher for a home delivery with these risk factors. "Families who are considering a home or birth center birth now have data to use in making ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Postpartum Bleeding, Cervical Ripening, Apnea of Prematurity, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Study: Plenty of IV Fluids May Make Childbirth Safer, Easier

Posted 28 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, March 27, 2017 – Giving more intravenous (IV) fluids to women during childbirth seems to reduce the risk of cesarean section and shortens labor, researchers report. "The results are compelling and strongly argue for a change in practice," said study author Dr. Vincenzo Berghella, director of maternal fetal medicine at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia. "We have already begun changing practice at Jefferson to give women more fluids in labor, to allow them to have the best chance of delivering vaginally," he added in a university news release. "We've known that it's important for women to stay well-hydrated during pregnancy and labor. This study suggests that IV fluids could help women maintain hydration at appropriate levels, reduce the likelihood of C-section, and decrease length of labor," Berghella said. In the study, his team reviewed seven small clinical trials ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Cervical Ripening, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy

Most Women Don't Eat Healthily When Eating for Two

Posted 17 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 17, 2017 – Despite the well-known wisdom of eating a healthy diet while pregnant, new research shows that most American women don't. This was especially true among black, Hispanic and less-educated women, the study authors said. For pregnant women, a healthy diet reduces the risk of obesity, preeclampsia, fetal growth restriction and preterm birth, the researchers noted. "Unlike many other pregnancy and birth risk factors, diet is something we can improve," said study author Lisa Bodnar of the University of Pittsburgh's School of Public Health. She is an associate professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences at Pitt's School of Medicine. "While attention should be given to improving nutritional counseling at doctor appointments, overarching societal and policy changes that help women to make healthy dietary choices may be more effective and efficient," ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Weight Loss, Delivery, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Toxemia of pregnancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, HELLP Syndrome

For 'Preemies,' Human Touch May Be a Brain Booster

Posted 16 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 16, 2017 – Underscoring the link between brain development and touch, new research suggests premature babies face a disadvantage compared to their full-term peers in their brain's sensitivity to gentle touch. Analyzing 125 preterm and full-term infants, scientists also found that preemies experienced lowered brain response to gentle touch in the aftermath of painful medical procedures. "We all know in our daily lives how important touch is, but for babies ... it's also a scaffold to building their brains," said study author Dr. Nathalie Maitre. She's director of the NICU follow-up clinic at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio. "Pain and touch don't go through the same nerves," Maitre added. "We didn't expect how the painful procedures and experience of pain would have an effect on how babies would process gentle touch." About 15 million babies around the ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Labor Pain, Apnea of Prematurity, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Tests to Spot 'Preemie' Birth Risk Ineffective in First Pregnancies

Posted 14 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 14, 2017 – Two tests that screen for preterm birth risk rarely spot trouble in first-time pregnancies, a new study suggests. The tests' predictive powers were assessed for naturally occurring preterm deliveries only, and not for medical procedures such as cesarean surgery or induced labor. "These methods of assessing women in their first pregnancy do not identify most of those who will later go on to have a spontaneous preterm delivery," said senior study author Dr. Uma Reddy. She is with the Pregnancy and Perinatology Branch at the U.S. National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. "There is a need to develop better screening tests that can be performed early in pregnancy," Reddy said in an institute news release. Preterm birth, defined as a birth before 37 weeks into pregnancy, is the leading cause of neonatal death or long-term disability, according to the ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Delivery, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Cervical Ripening, Diagnosis and Investigation, Cesarean Section, Labor Pain, Apnea of Prematurity, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Antiviral Flu Drugs Safe in Mid-to-Late Pregnancy: Study

Posted 1 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 1, 2017 – Taking antiviral drugs to prevent or treat flu during pregnancy doesn't appear to put the health of the fetus at risk, a new study finds. Researchers reviewed information from nearly 6,000 pregnant women who were given a prescription for antiviral drugs to treat flu. The prescriptions were for either oseltamivir (Tamiflu) or zanamivir (Relenza). The study didn't include women who took the drugs before 22 weeks of pregnancy. The researchers compared these women to nearly 700,000 expectant mothers who didn't take the drugs during pregnancy. Babies born to mothers prescribed the antiviral drugs didn't have higher rates of complications. The researchers looked at problems such as low birth weight, preterm birth, stillbirth and birth defects. The findings support previous studies showing that these drugs don't put babies at risk, according to study author Dr. ... Read more

Related support groups: Influenza, Tamiflu, Delivery, Swine Influenza, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Oseltamivir, Apnea of Prematurity, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Relenza, Zanamivir, Influenza with Pneumonia

More 'Extreme Preemies' Are Surviving

Posted 16 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 15, 2017 – Babies born very early – between 22 and 24 weeks of pregnancy – are more likely to survive now than a decade or so ago, new research shows. These extremely premature infants are also slightly more likely to avoid serious health complications now. But it's still a rough road for these infants, who often weigh in at less than 2 pounds at birth. Just one in three survive, and many face challenges. In a study that looked at a 12-year span, "survival increased and more infants went on to not have signs of developmental delay when tested around age 2," said lead author Dr. Noelle Younge. She's a neonatologist and assistant professor of pediatrics at Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, N.C. Yet much progress remains to be made, Younge acknowledged. Her research team reviewed the records of more than 4,200 infants born at 22 to 24 weeks of pregnancy, ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Apnea of Prematurity, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

The Motherlode of 'Mother Love' Chemicals

Posted 13 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 13, 2017 – The feel-good brain chemical dopamine appears to play a role in the development of a healthy bond between a mother and baby, a new study suggests. Dopamine may motivate moms to do more for their children because it makes mothers feel better, researchers said. And this may not end when babies get older. "It is very likely that the processes we observed between mothers and their infants continues through the life span as their children grow," said study co-author Lisa Feldman Barrett. She's a psychology professor at Northeastern University in Boston. "It may also be the case that this process supports people as they provide care and nurture to one another in close relationships," she added. Previously, research has linked mother-baby bonding to the hormone oxytocin. In this study, the researchers wanted to learn more about what goes on in the brain that helps ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Psychiatric Disorders, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy

Tiny Babies May Face Mental Health Problems Later

Posted 13 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 13, 2017 – Extremely low birth weight babies may be at increased risk for mental health problems later in life, a new review suggests. Researchers examined 41 studies conducted from 1990 to 2016. The studies included more than 2,700 extremely low birth weight babies (less than 1,000 grams, or just over 2 pounds) and more than 11,000 normal birth weight babies in the United States, Canada and 10 other countries. The extremely low birth weight babies had a higher risk for certain mental health problems. As children, they were more likely to have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and as teens they had a greater risk of ADHD and social problems, the researchers found. Compared to adults who were born at a normal weight, those born at an extremely low weight had higher rates of anxiety, depression and shyness, and markedly lower levels of social functioning, ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Adderall, Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Social Anxiety Disorder, Concerta, Ritalin, Adderall XR, Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Methylphenidate, Amphetamine, Autism, Dysthymia, Delivery, Psychiatric Disorders, Methylin, Daytrana, Amphetamine/Dextroamphetamine

Daily Aspirin May Help Prevent Some Recurrent Miscarriages

Posted 9 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 9, 2017 – Miscarriage is an often unexpected and traumatic event for a woman and her partner. But new research suggests that something as simple as taking a daily low-dose aspirin could help prevent a recurrence. The intervention appears to help boost live births in women with high levels of inflammation who previously lost a pregnancy, according to a research team from the U.S. National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). One obstetrician-gynecologist said the practice is already in use in cases involving women who've miscarried in the past. "Doctors have often used baby aspirin in these patients to help achieve a healthy pregnancy," said Dr. Jennifer Wu, an ob/gyn at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City who reviewed the new findings. "This study upholds a scientific theory to this treatment." The research was led by Lindsey Sjaarda, a staff ... Read more

Related support groups: Aspirin, Excedrin, Delivery, Aggrenox, Alka-Seltzer, Fiorinal, Excedrin Migraine, Arthritis Pain, Ecotrin, Fiorinal with Codeine, Labor Induction, Norgesic, Arthritis Pain Formula, Bayer Aspirin, Premature Labor, Soma Compound, Excedrin Extra Strength, Norgesic Forte, Percodan, Anacin

Can Pregnancy Harm Your Heart?

Posted 3 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 2, 2017 – Pregnancy might affect a woman's risk of future heart problems, two new studies suggest. A woman's risk of atrial fibrillation – an abnormal heart rhythm – rises with each pregnancy, up to a nearly 50 percent increased risk with six or more pregnancies, according to the results from one study. "There's something about pregnancy itself that predisposes women toward this risk," said lead author Dr. Jorge Wong. He's a cardiologist with the Population Health Research Institute at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario. Meanwhile, a second study reports that women who experience a preterm delivery have a 40 percent higher increased risk of heart attack or stroke later in life. Neither of these studies proves a direct cause-and-effect relationship between pregnancy and heart problems, both teams of researchers noted. For the heart rhythm report, researchers ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Emergency Contraception, Heart Disease, Postcoital Contraception, Angina, Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Ischemic Heart Disease, Cesarean Section, Labor Pain, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Do Weekend Deliveries Pose Risks for Moms?

Posted 2 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 1, 2017 – New research suggests that for pregnant women, a weekend delivery could mean a slightly increased risk of complications, including maternal death. While the rate of deaths was higher on weekends, the researchers stressed that any one woman's risk is quite small. Women don't need to think: "Oh gosh, I'm going into labor on Saturday, I'm going to die," said lead researcher Dr. Steven Clark. He's a professor of obstetrics and gynecology and maternal-fetal medicine at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. "The actual differences in the risk of death are extremely small, and the majority of women are going to be fine no matter when they deliver," Clark said. For the study, researchers reviewed outcomes from more than 45 million pregnancies in the United States between 2004 and 2014. They found a slightly increased risk of death among mothers who delivered over the ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Postpartum Bleeding, Cervical Ripening, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy

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Cervical Ripening, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

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Cytotec, misoprostol, oxytocin, Pitocin, dinoprostone, Cervidil, Syntocinon, blue cohosh, Prostin E2, Prepidil