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Are Catholic Women Less Likely to Breast-Feed?

Posted 2 days 9 hours ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Dec. 5, 2016 – Could religion play a role in breast-feeding practices? Women in Western nations with a strong Protestant heritage are more likely to breast-feed. However, the reverse seems to be true for those in nations with a strong Catholic heritage, new research suggests. "Our results suggest that women living in a country or region where Catholicism has historically dominated are less likely to initiate breast-feeding," according to the researchers. The study was led by Dr. Jonathan Bernard of Inserm, the national health research institute in France. "Breast-feeding promotion policies should be adapted to better fit populations' cultural and religious norms," Bernard and his colleagues added. The study doesn't prove that religion directly affects breast-feeding rates, however. It only suggests that they may be linked. The World Health Organization advises mothers to solely ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor Induction, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

C-Sections May Be Causing Evolutionary Changes

Posted 2 days 12 hours ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Dec. 5, 2016 – Why is it so difficult and painful for human females to give birth? Researchers have developed a new theory: Evolution favored small female pelvises and large newborns for good reasons. And, the researchers said, the rise of cesarean sections – the surgical delivery of a baby – in recent decades may be contributing to an even bigger gap between the size of newborns and their mothers' pelvises. In fact, the researchers estimate that the regular use of C-sections has led to a 10 to 20 percent increase in the gap between female pelvis width and babies' size. "Evolution is happening even in our modern society," said study lead author Philipp Mitteroecker, an assistant professor with the Department of Theoretical Biology at the University of Vienna, Austria. But, the human female pelvis has remained small, despite evolution, the researchers said. "The dimensions of ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Delivery, Premature Labor, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor Induction, Diagnosis and Investigation, Labor Pain, Cervical Ripening, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Could C-Section Birth Raise Child's Risk of Obesity?

Posted 14 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Nov. 13, 2016 – Babies delivered via C-section might be at increased risk for childhood obesity, researchers contend. Compared to vaginally delivered children, cesarean-delivered children seem to have a 40 percent greater risk of becoming overweight or obese by the time they turn 7, the study found. The risk was even stronger in children born by C-section to overweight and obese mothers, ranging from 70 to 80 percent, said lead researcher Noel Mueller, an assistant professor of epidemiology at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore. "We also found that the protective association conferred by vaginal delivery was as strong, if not stronger, among mothers that were overweight or obese, suggesting that vaginal delivery among overweight or obese mothers may help to mitigate the intergenerational transmission of obesity," Mueller said. Babies pick up beneficial ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Delivery, Premature Labor, Labor Induction, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Premature Calcium Deposits May Trigger Premature Births: Study

Posted 9 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 9, 2016 – A new potential risk factor for premature birth has been identified. Ten percent of infants are born prematurely (before 37 weeks of pregnancy), and many suffer long-term health problems. Knowing why preterm births occur might help prevent them, researchers said. A team at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, found that calcium deposits in the membrane surrounding the fetus can form early and may cause a mother's water to break too soon. The deposits, early markers of bone, make the membrane less elastic. The same kind of deposits have also been implicated in kidney stones and hardening of the arteries. But the new study did not prove that these early calcium deposits cause premature birth. "We do see calcium deposits in full term births as well, which is probably part of the normal breakdown of the membranes at the appropriate time," study senior ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Labor Induction, Labor Pain, Apnea of Prematurity, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Calcium Oxalate Calculi with Hyperuricosuria

Health Tip: Safer Sleep for Baby

Posted 8 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Exactly what do worried parents need to do to keep baby safer while the infant is asleep? The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends: Always put baby to sleep on the back, until baby turns a year old. If baby rolls over, you don't need to keep flipping the infant back. Just keep the crib clear of any objects, including pillows, bumper pads, toys and blankets. If baby falls asleep in a swing, or car seat, transfer baby to the crib as soon as possible. Make sure baby's crib mattress is firm. Don't let baby sleep in your bed. But for at least the first six months, put baby's crib in your bedroom. Never let baby sleep on a couch or chair. If you swaddle baby, make sure it's not too tight. Stop swaddling when baby tries to roll over. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Delivery, Premature Labor, Labor Induction, Labor Pain, Apnea of Prematurity, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Less Labor Pain, Lower Postpartum Depression Risk?

Posted 26 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 – Women who obtain good pain relief during labor may have to worry less about postpartum depression later, new research suggests. "Reducing pain during labor is associated with a reduced risk for postpartum depression," said study leader Dr. Grace Lim, director of obstetric anesthesiology at Magee-Women's Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Postpartum depression is a common condition, affecting one in eight women after having a baby. They may experience crying, feelings of anger, and anxiety about not being a good mother, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. So how might pain relief during labor affect a woman's mental health weeks later? First, Lim said, it's important to stress that the new study only found a link between pain relief in labor and less postpartum depression. It didn't prove a cause-and-effect ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Labor Induction, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Birthing Pool Not the Place to Deliver, New Guidelines Say

Posted 25 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 – While a birthing pool during the early stages of labor may offer some advantages, women should not deliver their baby in the water, new guidelines advise. Birthing pools can be found in hospitals, birthing centers or at home. A woman in labor lies in a tub of warm water to help ease delivery. "Immersion in water during the first stage of labor may offer some benefits: It may shorten labor and is associated with a decreased use of epidurals [injecting anesthesia into the spine]," said Dr. Joseph Wax. He chaired the committee that developed the recommendations for the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG). "However, it is important to differentiate between laboring in water and delivering in water," Wax said in an ACOG news release. "There is no evidence to support delivering a baby in water has benefits to the baby." In fact, according to ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Labor Induction, Postpartum Bleeding, Labor Pain, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Doctors Should Promote Breast-Feeding to Patients: Panel

Posted 25 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 – Doctors should provide breast-feeding support and guidance to new mothers and pregnant women, an expert panel says. This includes education about the benefits of breast-feeding, encouragement and practical help on how to breast-feed, according to the new U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation. Primary care providers should help women make an informed choice about breast-feeding, the panel said. "Breast-feeding has real health benefits for babies and their mothers. Primary care clinicians can help new moms who breast-feed be successful," said task force member Ann Kurth, dean of the Yale School of Nursing in New Haven, Conn. "Primary care interventions to support breast-feeding are effective in increasing both the number of mothers who breast-feed and how long they breast-feed their babies," she added in a task force news release. Breast-feeding ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor Induction, Lactation Suppression, Lactation Augmentation, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Is Morning Sickness a Good Thing?

Posted 26 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 26, 2016 – While morning sickness may make you miserable in the early months of your pregnancy, it can signal that your baby is healthy and normal, new research shows. In the study, those who endured the nausea and vomiting of morning sickness were 50 percent to 75 percent less likely to experience a pregnancy loss. The review focused on women who'd already lost one or two pregnancies. "This should be reassuring for women experiencing these symptoms, which can be very taxing," said lead researcher Stefanie Hinkle. She is a staff scientist at the U.S. National Institute of Child Health and Human Development in Bethesda, Md. As many as four out of five women report nausea or vomiting during pregnancy, the researchers said in background notes. Morning sickness often is cited as a sign of a healthy pregnancy, but little is known about it, Hinkle and other experts said. For ... Read more

Related support groups: Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor Induction, Nausea/Vomiting of Pregnancy, Hyperemesis Gravidarum with Metabolic Disturbance, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Delivering Twins at 37 Weeks May Help Prevent Stillbirths

Posted 7 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7, 2016 – A woman carrying twins should deliver her babies at 37 weeks to reduce the risk of stillbirth and newborn death, new research says. A normal pregnancy usually lasts 40 weeks. The risk of stillbirth (when a fetus dies in the womb) is higher in twin pregnancies, and it's common for doctors to deliver twins early in an attempt to prevent stillbirth. But the best time for such deliveries has been unclear, the study authors said. To find an answer, the international team of researchers reviewed 32 studies that were conducted over the past 10 years and included more than 35,000 twin pregnancies. The researchers compared the risk of stillbirth to the risk of newborn death. Newborn death was defined as death up to 28 days after delivery. The risk of stillbirth starts increasing if a twin pregnancy goes too long. But, the risk of newborn death goes down as the length ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Labor Induction, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

What Mom-to-Be Eats Determines Bugs in Baby's Gut: Study

Posted 9 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 9, 2016 – The amount of fat in a pregnant woman's diet may influence the mix of microbes in her baby's gut, a new study suggests. The community of gut microbes – known as the microbiome – can affect the development of a baby's immune system and the ability to extract energy from food, the researchers said. The study included more than 150 women who provided a record of their eating habits during pregnancy. The amount of fat in their diets ranged from 14 percent to 55 percent, with an average of 33 percent. The U.S. Institute of Medicine recommends 20 percent to 35 percent. The gut microbiomes of babies born to mothers who ate a high-fat diet during pregnancy were different from those of babies whose mothers who did not. Specifically, babies whose mothers ate a high-fat diet had fewer Bacteroides microbes in their guts, both at birth and several weeks after. Having fewer ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Obesity, Delivery, Acidophilus, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Premature Labor, Labor Induction, Florastor, Lactobacillus Acidophilus, Lactinex, VSL#3, Flora-Q, Floranex, Cesarean Section, Florajen3, Flora-Q 2, Saccharomyces Boulardii Lyo, Bio-K+, Florajen

U.S. Maternal Death Rate Is Rising

Posted 8 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 8, 2016 – The number of U.S. women who die during or soon after pregnancy may be higher than previously thought – and it's on the rise, according to a new study. Between 2000 and 2014, the nation's maternal death rate rose by almost 27 percent, researchers found. However, over that time, reporting methods changed, the study authors noted. For every 100,000 live births, nearly 24 women died during, or within 42 days after pregnancy in 2014. That was up from nearly 19 per 100,000 in 2000. The numbers, published online Aug. 8 in Obstetrics & Gynecology, are worse than previous estimates. Federal health officials have already reported a spike in the nation's maternal mortality figures, but they estimated a rate of 16 per 100,000 as recently as 2010. The new findings give a clearer picture of where the United States really stands, according to lead researcher Marian MacDorman, ... Read more

Related support groups: Bleeding Disorder, Abnormal Uterine Bleeding, Delivery, Premature Labor, Labor Induction, Postpartum Bleeding, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Babies' Sleep 'Twitching' May Aid Their Development

Posted 2 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 2, 2016 – When parents watch babies sleep, they often assume that the tiny twitches they see are a response to a dream. But researchers believe that twitching may actually be part of a baby's motor skills development. When a baby's body twitches during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, it's triggering circuits throughout the brain to teach newborns about their limbs and how to use them, University of Iowa researchers believe. Along with increasing knowledge about early development, learning more about early sensory and motor (sensorimotor) skills development could help improve understanding of certain developmental disorders, such as autism and schizophrenia, the researchers said. "Although often overlooked, there is a substantial problem with the sensorimotor system in these disorders," Mark Blumberg, a professor in the department of psychological and brain sciences, said ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Labor Induction, Postpartum Bleeding, Diagnosis and Investigation, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Pregnancy Problems More Likely With Baby Boys, Study Suggests

Posted 29 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 29, 2016 – Serious pregnancy complications are more likely when women are carrying baby boys, new research suggests. After analyzing more than half a million births in Australia, researchers said the baby's gender could be linked to the health of both mother and child. "The sex of the baby has a direct association with pregnancy complications," said study first author Dr. Petra Verburg, of the Robinson Research Institute at the University of Adelaide in Australia. Boy babies were more likely to be born early, which sets up infants for more health problems. Also, women carrying boys were slightly more likely to have diabetes during pregnancy (gestational diabetes), and pre-eclampsia, a serious high blood pressure condition, when ready to deliver, the study authors said. Although it isn't totally clear why this is so, "there are likely to be genetic factors," Verburg said. ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Delivery, Premature Labor, Labor Induction, Postpartum Bleeding, Labor Pain, Cervical Ripening, Gestational Diabetes, Apnea of Prematurity, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Hyperemesis Gravidarum with Metabolic Disturbance

Induced Labor Won't Raise Autism Risk in Kids, Research Suggests

Posted 25 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 25, 2016 – Inducing labor won't raise a pregnant woman's risk of having a child with autism, a new study suggests. "These findings should provide reassurance to women who are about to give birth, that having their labor induced will not increase their child's risk of developing autism spectrum disorders," said senior researcher Dr. Brian Bateman. He's an anesthesiologist at Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. One 2013 study had suggested a possible link between autism and induced labor using medication, such as oxytocin, the researchers noted. Labor induction is sometimes recommended when a woman's labor stalls and her health or the health of her baby are endangered. Since the 2013 study, many pregnant women may have had fears about being induced. So, Bateman's team of American and Swedish researchers, led by the Harvard T. H. Chan ... Read more

Related support groups: Autism, Delivery, Asperger Syndrome, Labor Induction, Labor Pain, Cervical Ripening, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

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Related Condition Support Groups

Cervical Ripening, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

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Cytotec, misoprostol, oxytocin, Pitocin, dinoprostone, Cervidil, Syntocinon, blue cohosh, Prostin E2, Prepidil