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Related terms: Cardiomyopathy, ischemic, Ischemic Cardiomyopathy

3 Key Lifestyle Factors Can Lower Breast Cancer Odds

Posted 13 hours ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 23, 2017 – Things that keep you healthy overall, also appear to help lower a woman's risk of breast cancer, a new review says. The review found that exercising regularly, maintaining a healthy weight and limiting alcohol could all reduce breast cancer odds. The report, from the American Institute for Cancer Research and the World Cancer Research Fund, is based on a review of over 100 studies. On balance, researchers found, regular exercise was tied to small reductions in the risk of breast cancer. On the other hand, the risk was elevated among women who drank regularly – even at a "moderate" one-drink-a-day level. Meanwhile, women who were overweight throughout adulthood faced a heightened risk of breast cancer after menopause. The bottom line is that women can take steps to cut their odds of developing the disease, according to Dr. Anne McTiernan, one of the report ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Diabetes, Type 2, Cancer, Heart Disease, Weight Loss, Breast Cancer, Alcohol Dependence, Pre-Diabetes, Alcoholism, Hangover, Diabetes Mellitus, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Ischemic Heart Disease, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Acute Alcohol Intoxication

Study Casts Doubt on Need for Statins in the 'Healthy Old'

Posted 1 day 12 hours ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 22, 2017 – Senior citizens with no history of heart problems appear to gain no health benefit from cholesterol-lowering statin drugs, a new study suggests. People 65 and older treated with pravastatin (Pravachol) as part of a major clinical trial had about the same risk of death as people in a placebo group, according to the results. They also appeared to suffer strokes and heart attacks at about the same rate. "Our study shows there may not be any benefit for taking a statin therapy for primary prevention for people who are over the age of 65," said Dr. Benjamin Han. Statins might even pose a risk to people 75 and older, added Han, an assistant professor of medicine and population health at New York University School of Medicine. "There was some suggestion the statin group had a little bit higher mortality than the placebo group" at that age, Han said. But, this result was ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Heart Disease, High Cholesterol, Lipitor, Simvastatin, Crestor, Atorvastatin, Pravastatin, Zocor, Lovastatin, Rosuvastatin, Pravachol, Livalo, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Red Yeast Rice, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Lescol, Ischemic Heart Disease, Lescol XL

Heart Disease the No. 1 Killer Worldwide

Posted 6 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 17, 2017 – Roughly a third of all deaths around the world are the result of heart disease and stroke, making cardiovascular disease the number one killer globally, new research finds. Big declines in heart disease-driven fatalities in countries such as the United States, Canada, Australia, Japan, South Korea and many countries in Western Europe have started to level off over the past 20 years, investigators reported. "It is an alarming threat to global health," said study lead author Dr. Gregory Roth, an assistant professor of cardiology at the University of Washington School of Medicine. "Trends in cardiovascular disease mortality are no longer declining for high-income regions," he noted in an American College of Cardiology news release, "and low- and middle-income countries are also seeing more cardiovascular disease-related deaths." The study included 2,300 ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Smoking, Heart Disease, Ischemic Stroke, High Cholesterol, Heart Attack, Arrhythmia, Myocardial Infarction, Alcoholism, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Hangover, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Acute Alcohol Intoxication

Angela Bassett Puts the Spotlight on Heart Health

Posted 7 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 16, 2017 – Actress Angela Bassett has graced film and TV screens with a wide range of award-winning performances for decades. But her latest role is that of spokeswoman, raising awareness of links between type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Unfortunately, it's an issue Bassett understands only too well. "I got involved with this movement because of my mom – to honor her," Bassett said. "She had type 2 diabetes and three years ago she died from heart disease." Bassett's mother, Betty Jane Bassett, passed away in 2014 at the age of 78. "Until that time, I know I was pretty unaware of the connection between type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease," Bassett admitted. And although her mother's particular situation was complicated, Bassett believes that knowing about that risk and having the opportunity to make potentially helpful lifestyle changes "would have made a big ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Heart Disease, Insulin Resistance, Diabetes Mellitus, Ischemic Heart Disease, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance

Heart Health Might Be a Matter of Geography

Posted 8 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 16, 2017 – The county you call home may have a lot to do with your chances of dying from heart disease or stroke, a new U.S. study reveals. Although deaths from cardiovascular disease have been dropping overall for the past 35 years in the United States, there are still pockets across the country where these death rates are unusually high, the researchers said. Poverty and lack of access to quality care may doom many Americans to early deaths, the study authors suggested. "In some counties, the risk of dying from cardiovascular disease is extremely low, while in other counties the risk continues to be very high," said lead researcher Dr. Gregory Roth. He is an assistant professor of cardiology at the University of Washington. In Pitkin County in Colorado, for example, about 35 people out of 100,000 died from heart disease in 2014 – the lowest death rate in the United ... Read more

Related support groups: Atrial Fibrillation, Heart Disease, Arrhythmia, Aortic Aneurysm, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Endocarditis, Bacterial Endocarditis Prevention, Bacterial Endocarditis Prophylaxis, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis

'Fight or Flight' Response Greater in Combat Vets With PTSD: Study

Posted 9 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 15, 2017 – Combat veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have a stepped-up "fight or flight" response, which researchers say may explain why PTSD boosts the risk of high blood pressure and heart disease. PTSD can occur among civilians but is nearly twice as widespread in the military. Previous research had shown that veterans' "fight or flight" response is overactive. In this study, researchers measured this response directly in an attempt to learn why. The research involved 14 post-9/11 veterans who were diagnosed with PSTD and 14 without it. Both groups were exposed to two types of mental stress, including first-person war images and sounds shown through virtual reality goggles. As this happened, their blood pressure and heart activity were monitored. Using electrodes, the researchers also recorded activity in their nervous system. The study results revealed ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Heart Disease, Ischemic Heart Disease, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Astronauts' Blood Vessels Less Efficient on Long Missions: Study

Posted 12 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, May 12, 2017 – Astronauts' heart and blood vessel function drops during long space missions, which limits their ability to exercise, a new study finds. Researchers examined data gathered from nine men and women who spent about six months on the International Space Station. Before their missions, the astronauts did a stationary bike exercise, which they repeated after returning to Earth. Comparing before-and-after results showed that their heart and small blood vessels became less effective at transporting oxygen to muscles. The result: A drop of 30 percent to 50 percent in their exercise capacity, the researchers reported. "It is a dramatic decrease," said study co-author Carl Ade, an assistant professor of exercise physiology at Kansas State University. "When your cardiovascular function decreases, your aerobic exercise capacity goes down. You can't perform physically ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Heart Disease, Ischemic Heart Disease

People With Pre-Existing Health Issues Fear Repeal-and-Replace Bill

Posted 12 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 11, 2017 – Maureen Murphy believes she has much to lose if Republicans in Congress pass a bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. One of millions of Americans with a pre-existing condition, Murphy was a healthy nonsmoker with normal blood pressure when her medical saga began. What one hospital wrongly diagnosed as Bell's palsy turned out to be "antiphospholipid antibody syndrome with anticardiolipin antibodies." In short, her own body was attacking normal blood proteins and forming multiple blood clots. An MRI revealed that she had suffered a series of small strokes. Murphy, a television and video production specialist, had tried to buy coverage ahead of her diagnosis in October 2010. But she got stung by a proposed rate hike because of a pre-existing condition. Turns out she had been tagged with "depression" because she attended ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Heart Disease, HIV Infection, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus, Ischemic Heart Disease

Common Painkillers Tied to Slight Rise in Heart Attack Risk

Posted 14 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 9, 2017 – Commonly used painkillers such as Motrin, Advil and Aleve might increase your risk for heart attack, even in the first week of use, a new study suggests. Overall, these drugs and others known as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) increase the risk of a heart attack by 20 to 50 percent, compared with not using them, researchers found. For most people, however, this represents only a small increased risk – about 1 percent a year, the researchers said. Still, "from the viewpoint of public health, even small increases in risk of heart attack are important because use of NSAIDs is so widespread," said lead researcher Michele Bally. She's an epidemiologist at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Center. The increased risk of heart attack associated with NSAIDs was seen at any dose taken for one week, one month or more than one month. And the risk ... Read more

Related support groups: Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Heart Disease, Ischemic Stroke, Heart Attack, Celebrex, Advil, Diclofenac, Voltaren, Aleve, Voltaren Gel, Motrin, Transient Ischemic Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Vicoprofen, Flector, Flector Patch, Arthrotec, Naprosyn, Advil PM

Is a Low-Salt Diet Always Healthy?

Posted 25 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 25, 2017 – Steering clear of salty foods might not be as helpful for your heart health as previously thought, a new study claims. Participants in a long-range heart study did not appear to derive any health advantage from a low-salt diet, said lead researcher Lynn Moore. "People who were on a lower-sodium [salt] diet in general over the next 20 or 30 years actually had no benefit, specifically in terms of their blood pressure or their risk of developing heart disease," said Moore, an associate professor with the Boston University School of Medicine. On the other hand, these people did enjoy better health when they increased their intake of potassium, a mineral that helps the heart in a couple of ways, Moore and her colleagues found. "Higher intakes of potassium were strongly associated with both a lower blood pressure and a lower risk of heart disease," Moore said. "The ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Heart Disease, Sodium Chloride, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, HalfLytely and Bisacodyl, Ischemic Heart Disease, Rhinaris, Hyper-Sal, Potassium Chloride/Sodium Chloride, Saline Nasal Mist, Thermotabs, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Dextrose/Sodium Chloride, Ayr Saline Nasal, ENTsol, Ocean, Ocean Kids, Afrin Saline

Exercise Benefits Aging Hearts, Even Those of the Obese

Posted 24 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 24, 2017 – Exercise can reduce the risk of heart damage in middle-aged adults and seniors – even in those who are obese, according to a new study. "The protective association of physical activity against [heart] damage may have implications for heart failure risk reduction, particularly among the high-risk group of individuals with excess weight," study lead author Dr. Roberta Florido said in an American College of Cardiology news release. Florido is a cardiology fellow at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore. "Promoting physical activity," she added, "may be a particularly important strategy for heart failure risk reductions among high risk groups such as those with obesity." To gauge the influence of physical activity on heart health, the researchers looked at the experience of more than 9,400 people between 45 and 64 years of age. The participants ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Heart Disease, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Ischemic Heart Disease

Early Onset Hot Flashes May Signal Higher Heart Risks

Posted 13 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 13, 2017 – Hot flashes may be more than a troublesome nuisance for some women during menopause – they may be a signal for increased risk of heart disease, new research suggests. Researchers tracked the health of 272 nonsmoking women, aged 40 to 60. Among women between 40 and 53 years of age, frequent hot flashes were linked to poorer function in blood vessels, the study found. This association was independent of other heart disease risk factors, noted the team led by Rebecca Thurston of the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. The link seemed restricted to the younger women in the study – there was no such relationship among women aged 54 to 60, the study authors said. One obstetrician/gynecologist called the findings potentially "groundbreaking." At least in those women who undergo menopause early, hot flashes "are not simply a bother, but herald potential ... Read more

Related support groups: Hot Flashes, Menopausal Disorders, Postmenopausal Symptoms, Perimenopausal Symptoms, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease

Do Marathons' Road Closures Lead to More Local Deaths?

Posted 13 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 12, 2017 – When a marathon shuts down city streets, it's more than an inconvenience: Nearby residents appear more likely to die from heart attack and cardiac arrest, a new study finds. The study, of 11 U.S. cities, found that older residents were less likely to survive the heart events on marathon days, compared to other days, perhaps due to delays in receiving care. Older people who landed in the hospital on a race day were over 13 percent more likely to die within a month, the findings showed. There was a similar difference when researchers compared those patients with older adults admitted the same day to hospitals outside the marathon-affected areas. The study drew praise but also notes of caution. "This is a great study," said Dr. Howard Mell, a spokesman for the American College of Emergency Physicians. When a city hosts a major sports event, he said, organizers ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome

Exercisers May Have Better Shot of Surviving Heart Attack

Posted 12 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 12, 2017 – Maybe this will be the news that finally jolts you off the couch and into an exercise program. A new study suggests that being physically active increases the chances of survival after a heart attack. Researchers compared exercise levels among 1,664 heart attack patients in Denmark, including 425 who died immediately. Those who had been physically active were less likely to die, and the risk of death decreased as exercise levels rose. Patients who had light or moderate/high physical activity levels were 32 percent and 47 percent less likely to die from their heart attack, respectively, than the sedentary patients. The study was published April 12 in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology. "We know that exercise protects people against having a heart attack," said study co-author Eva Prescott, a professor of cardiovascular prevention and rehabilitation ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, High Cholesterol, Heart Attack, Angina, Myocardial Infarction, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Atherosclerosis, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome

A Healthy Middle-Aged Heart May Protect Your Brain Later

Posted 11 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 11, 2017 – Healthy aging of the brain relies on the health of your heart and blood vessels when you're younger, a new study reports. People with risk factors for heart disease and stroke in middle age are more likely to have elevated levels of amyloid, a sticky protein known to clump together and form plaques in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease, the researchers said. MRI scans revealed larger deposits of amyloid in the brains of seniors who smoked, had high blood pressure, were obese, diabetic or had elevated cholesterol levels when they were middle-aged, said lead researcher Dr. Rebecca Gottesman. She's an assistant professor of neurology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore. All of these risk factors can affect the health of a person's blood vessels, otherwise known as vascular health, leading to hardening of the arteries and ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Heart Disease, High Cholesterol, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Hypertriglyceridemia, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Mild Cognitive Impairment, Diabetes Mellitus, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Ischemic Heart Disease, Head Imaging

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