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Related terms: Cardiomyopathy, ischemic, Ischemic Cardiomyopathy

Common Virus May Be Linked to Heart Disease, Diabetes in Some Women

Posted 9 hours ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 23, 2017 – A common virus may make some women more susceptible to both heart disease and type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests. Scientists at the University of California, San Francisco found normal-weight women under age 50 who were infected with cytomegalovirus (CMV) were more likely to have metabolic syndrome than their peers. Metabolic syndrome is a collection of risk factors for heart disease and diabetes that includes excess belly fat, unhealthy cholesterol levels, high blood pressure and high blood sugar levels. CMV, a herpes virus, is believed to infect roughly half of the U.S. population over the age of 40. Typically there are no symptoms unless the person's immune system is weakened. Ironically, obese women infected with CMV were less likely to have metabolic syndrome than obese women not infected with the virus, the researchers found. However, obese women were ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Heart Disease, High Cholesterol, Crohn's Disease, Insulin Resistance, Crohn's Disease - Maintenance, Pre-Diabetes, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Crohn's Disease - Acute, Viral Infection, Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Infection, Ulcerative Proctitis, Ischemic Heart Disease, CMV Pneumonia, CMV Retinitis, CMV Gastroenteritis

Unhealthy in Middle Age, Dementia in Old Age?

Posted 1 day 2 hours ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 – Middle-aged men and women at risk for heart disease may also face a higher chance of dementia later in life, a new study suggests. Risk factors such as smoking, high blood pressure and diabetes might boost the odds of dementia almost as much as carrying the gene that raises the risk of Alzheimer's disease, the researchers reported. "Most of these risk factors are treatable or preventable. And it is important to treat these vascular [circulatory system] risk factors starting at least in middle age, if not earlier," said lead researcher Dr. Rebecca Gottesman. She's an associate professor of neurology and epidemiology at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. Know your blood pressure, so it can be treated if it's high. Also, know if you have diabetes, so you can control and treat it. And stop smoking, Gottesman said. "These are important risk factors not only ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Smoking, Heart Disease, Smoking Cessation, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Diabetes Mellitus, Ischemic Heart Disease, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features, Drug-Induced Dementia

MRIs Can Be Safe for People With Heart Devices …

Posted 1 day 2 hours ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 – People with pacemakers or implantable defibrillators have long been told they can't undergo MRI scans. But a new study suggests that it can be safely done – under the right conditions. The study, published in the Feb. 23 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, focused on patients with standard heart devices not designed to be MRI-compatible. The study found that even for them, an MRI can be safely performed, when a specific protocol is followed. "I think this really opens a door for these patients to have an MRI when medically indicated," said lead researcher Dr. Robert Russo, of the Scripps Research Institute, in La Jolla, Calif. The big caveat, though, is that patients in the study were all screened and went through a specific protocol. An expert in cardiac devices – a doctor, physician's assistant or nurse practitioner – had to be present during ... Read more

Related support groups: Cardiac Arrhythmia, Heart Block, Ischemic Heart Disease, Body Imaging

Heart Disease Linked to Anxiety, Negative Feelings

Posted 2 days 3 hours ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 21, 2017 – People with mild heart disease are more likely to say they have poorer health, anxiety and a negative outlook than people in the general population, a new study suggests. These problems are more common among female patients than male patients, the research found. In mild heart disease, there is partial blockage of blood flow to the heart. People with the condition are more at risk of heart attacks, other serious heart problems, and death from any cause. The perception of overall physical and mental health, as well as personality, can have an impact on health outcomes, study senior author Paula Mommersteeg suggested. The study was published Feb. 21 in the journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes. "We were very intrigued by these sex and gender differences – we had not thought they would be so apparent," Mommersteeg said in a journal news ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Angina, Myocardial Infarction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis

Loneliness Often Plagues Black Women at Risk for Heart Disease

Posted 2 days 3 hours ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 21, 2017 – Heart disease can be a heavy burden for anyone. But new research suggests that black women at risk for the illness are also more prone to loneliness and money worries than their white peers. That's important, researchers said, because there's evidence that loneliness can raise risks of heart disease and other health problems. Black women "at risk for cardiovascular disease [often] have unique predictors of loneliness" compared to white women, study author Karen Saban said in a news release from the International Stroke Conference. Saban is associate dean for research at Loyola University's School of Nursing, in Maywood, Ill. She was to present the findings at the stroke meeting in Houston on Tuesday. The new study included 50 black and 49 white postmenopausal women with at least two risk factors for heart disease. The women completed questionnaires outlining ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Lisinopril, Metoprolol, Heart Disease, Atenolol, Losartan, Heart Attack, Menopausal Disorders, Benicar, Diovan, Bystolic, Angina, Ramipril, Bisoprolol, Postmenopausal Symptoms, Cozaar, Micardis, Enalapril, Valsartan, Benazepril

Learning Issues Common in Kids With Heart Defects: Study

Posted 2 days 3 hours ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 21, 2017 – Children born with heart defects seem to be at increased risk of learning problems in elementary school, a new study suggests. And those with less severe heart abnormalities may not receive needed assistance, the study of third graders from North Carolina found. Among more than 9,000 students, children born with a heart defect were 24 percent more likely to not meet end-of-year standards in reading or math, compared to those with healthy hearts, the researchers determined. "Schools should be aware that children with heart defects can have learning difficulties, even many years after their heart defect is supposedly 'fixed,' " said study lead author Dr. Matthew Oster. He's a pediatric cardiologist at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta. Examining education records and birth data, the researchers compared more than 2,800 children born with heart defects – so-called ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Ischemic Heart Disease, Heart Murmur, Abnormal Electrocardiogram, Cardiothoracic Surgery

Testosterone Therapy May Have Benefits, But Risks Too

Posted 2 days 9 hours ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 21, 2017 – Testosterone treatment can boost bone density and reduce anemia in older men with low levels of the hormone, but it might also open the door to future heart risks, a new set of trials suggests. The findings come in the last four studies to be reported out of the Testosterone Trials, a set of seven overlapping federally funded year-long clinical trials conducted at 12 sites across the United States. All told, the Testosterone Trials seem to indicate that the best use of testosterone therapy is for treatment of decreased sexual function in men with so-called "low T" (low testosterone levels), said Dr. Thomas Gill. He is a Yale University professor of geriatrics who ran one of the clinical trial sites. But the trials also found that men receiving testosterone treatment experienced a significantly greater increase in arterial plaque than men not taking the hormone, ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Testosterone, AndroGel, Testim, Axiron, Myocardial Infarction, Androderm, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Depo-Testosterone, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Fortesta, Testopel, Testopel Pellets, Methyltestosterone, Stanozolol, Ischemic Heart Disease, Android, Winstrol, Oxandrolone

Health Tip: Reducing Your Heart Disease Risk

Posted 3 days ago by Drugs.com

-- If you have risk factors for heart disease, such as being overweight, eating unhealthy foods or being sedentary, take steps to lower your risk. The American Academy of Family Physicians recommends: Eat a healthy diet, consisting of lean proteins, vegetables, fruit and whole grains. Indulge occasionally in your favorite cravings. If you're overweight, set weight-loss goals. Even losing a small percentage of your body weight reduces your risk for heart disease. Get more active. Go for walks, dance, do sit-ups or push-ups. You don't have to join a gym to move more. Do not use tobacco in any form. Find healthy ways to control stress. Take care of your teeth and gums, as there is a link between gum disease and heart disease. You don't have to make all of these changes at once. Achieve one goal at a time. Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Smoking, Heart Disease, Weight Loss, Oral and Dental Conditions, Smoking Cessation, Toothache, Gingivitis, Dental Abscess, Periodontitis, Prevention of Dental Caries, Ischemic Heart Disease

Heart, Lung Problems May Not Always Need ICU Care

Posted 6 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Feb. 17, 2017 – The intensive care unit (ICU) may not improve the chances of survival for all patients with serious heart problems, a new study suggests. "We found that the ICU may not always be the answer. Now, we need to help doctors decide who needs the ICU and who doesn't," study lead author Dr. Thomas Valley said. He's a pulmonary and critical care researcher at the University of Michigan Medical School. Researchers examined 1.5 million Medicare records to determine outcomes for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), heart attack and worsening heart failure. Many patients with these conditions are admitted to an ICU. There was no difference in 30-day death rates between patients in the ICU and those who received regular inpatient care in another type of hospital unit, the study authors said. However, ICU care was almost $5,000 more for patients with ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Dyspnea, Myocardial Infarction, Left Ventricular Dysfunction, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Respiratory Tract Disease, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Respiratory Failure, Respiratory Depression, Left Ventriculography, Respiratory Arrest

Shocks From Implanted Defibrillators Trigger Health Costs of Their Own

Posted 8 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 15, 2017 – While implanted defibrillators can deliver a potentially lifesaving shock to a heart that's beating erratically, patients often wind up in the emergency room or the hospital needing medical procedures afterwards, a new study shows. That was the case whether the shock was needed or not, and in 38 percent of cases it wasn't, the researchers added. "I see two implications," said study co-author Dr. Matthew Reynolds. "First, we need to do all we can to minimize these shock events, which are known to negatively affect patients' quality of life, are undesirable clinically and, in our study, trigger costly medical interventions." These procedures include invasive measures to test the heart's function, according to the study. "Second, there is no standard approach to managing these events . . . so we need to develop a better understanding of which interventions are ... Read more

Related support groups: Atrial Fibrillation, Heart Disease, Arrhythmia, Cardiac Arrhythmia, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ventricular Arrhythmia, Ischemic Heart Disease

5 Ways Women Can Cut Their Heart Attack Risk

Posted 8 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 14, 2017 – Heart disease is the leading killer of American women, but lifestyle changes can reduce the risk, a heart expert says. An estimated 43 million women in the United States have heart disease, but many don't know it, according to Dr. Mary Ann McLaughlin. She's medical director of the Mount Sinai Health System's Cardiac Health Program in New York City. As part of American Heart Month in February, McLaughlin describes how women can protect themselves: Starting 10 years after menopause, women should ask about a stress test if they have a family history of heart disease or are obese. Doctors also recommend a stress test if you want to start a vigorous exercise program or if you have chest pressure or shortness of breath when walking uphill. Reduce emotional stress levels through exercise, mediation or yoga. Emotional stress is a bigger heart risk factor in women than ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Obesity, Hot Flashes, Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Menopausal Disorders, Alcohol Dependence, Postmenopausal Symptoms, Dyspnea, Myocardial Infarction, Alcoholism, Hangover, Perimenopausal Symptoms, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Abnormal Electrocardiogram, Acute Alcohol Intoxication

Heart Disease Could Cost U.S. $1 Trillion Per Year By 2035: Report

Posted 9 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 14, 2017 – Heart disease is increasing at a troubling pace in the United States, with costs expected to double from $555 billion in 2016 to a whopping $1.1 trillion in 2035, a new American Heart Association report estimates. "Our new projections indicate cardiovascular disease is on a course that could bankrupt our nation's economy and health care system," said AHA President Steven Houser. He's also associate dean of research at Temple University in Philadelphia. By 2035, 45 percent of the total U.S. population – about 131 million people – will have at least one health problem related to heart disease, the AHA report projected. Heart disease is spreading much more quickly than previously estimated, Houser said at a news conference. The last time the AHA performed these calculations, in 2011, researchers projected that by 2030 about 40 percent of the United States would ... Read more

Related support groups: Atrial Fibrillation, Heart Disease, Ischemic Stroke, Heart Attack, Heart Failure, Congestive Heart Failure, Myocardial Infarction, Left Ventricular Dysfunction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis

Genes Tied to Belly Size Also Linked to Heart Disease

Posted 9 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 14, 2017 – Gene variants that raise a person's odds of being "apple-shaped" may be linked to heightened risks of heart disease and type 2 diabetes, a large study suggests. Many previous studies have hinted that a large waistline can be particularly unhealthy, compared to carrying your weight around the hips and thighs ("pear-shaped"). This new research suggests that people who carry weight at the belly tend to have higher rates of diabetes and heart disease. These types of studies do not prove a cause-and-effect link, said Dr. Kirk Knowlton, director of cardiovascular research at Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City. But, the new findings "go a step further," said Knowlton, who was not involved in the study. The new findings give "considerably more weight" to the evidence that excess belly fat, by itself, contributes to diabetes and heart ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Diabetes, Type 2, Heart Disease, Weight Loss, Ischemic Heart Disease, Diagnosis and Investigation

Heart Disease Affects Far More Than the Heart

Posted 9 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 14, 2017 – Heart disease affects more than just the heart. It also can take a toll on the legs, feet, kidneys and even the brain, according to vascular surgery experts. Heart disease is a general term, usually linked to arteriosclerosis or "hardening of the arteries," the Society for Vascular Surgery explained. Arteriosclerosis is a progressive disease in which plaque builds up in the arteries. As the arteries become blocked, it becomes harder for oxygen-rich blood to flow throughout the body, said Dr. Ali AbuRahma, secretary of the society. AbuRahma is also chief of vascular-endovascular surgery at West Virginia University's Robert C. Byrd Health Sciences Center. Peripheral artery disease (PAD) develops when heart disease affects the legs and feet. This condition affects about 8.5 million people in the United States, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Lisinopril, Hypertension, Heart Disease, Losartan, Benicar, Diovan, Ramipril, Cozaar, Micardis, Insulin Resistance, Enalapril, Valsartan, Benazepril, Minoxidil, Avapro, Atacand, Nitroglycerin, Irbesartan

Amphetamine Abuse Abuses the Heart

Posted 13 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Feb. 10, 2017 – Using illegal amphetamine drugs such as "speed" and "ice" may lead to premature aging of the arteries and heart, researchers warn. They said their new study adds to evidence about the need to tackle the "global stimulant epidemic." The investigators were led by Stuart Reece, a clinical associate professor at the University of Western Australia. They assessed arterial stiffening in more than 700 Australians in their 30s and 40s. Arteries tend to harden with age. Those participants who used illegal amphetamines showed greater aging of the arteries than others, including those who smoked tobacco or used the heroin substitute methadone, the study reported. The link between illegal amphetamine use and greater aging of the arteries was seen in men and women. It was also independent of other risk factors for heart disease and stroke, Reece and his colleagues said. It's ... Read more

Related support groups: Adderall, Heart Disease, Ischemic Stroke, Adderall XR, Drug Dependence, Amphetamine, Substance Abuse, Amphetamine/Dextroamphetamine, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Evekeo, Ischemic Heart Disease, Dyanavel XR, Adzenys XR-ODT

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Myocardial Infarction, Heart Attack, Angina, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Heart Disease