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Related terms: Cardiomyopathy, ischemic, Ischemic Cardiomyopathy

Motor On, Heart Patients: Electric Cars Don't Harm Cardiac Implants

Posted 7 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 13, 2017 – Heart patients who've bought an all-electric Tesla need not worry that their car might interfere with their implanted defibrillator. That's the finding from a new study of 34 seniors who had the devices, which help guard against dangerous irregular heartbeats. The study "demonstrates the safety of the Tesla electric vehicle in patients with cardiac defibrillators and is the first step in establishing that these vehicles are safe for patients with cardiac devices," said Dr. Apoor Patel, a cardiologist who reviewed the findings. Patel directs cardiac electrophysiology at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. He believes the study will "need to be replicated [in] other vehicles," but also noted that "the Tesla generated the most electrical activity during charging." The new study was led by Drs. Thein Tun Aung and Abdul Wase, of Good Samaritan Hospital in Dayton, ... Read more

Related support groups: Atrial Fibrillation, Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Arrhythmia, Tachyarrhythmia, Cardiac Arrhythmia, Ventricular Tachycardia, Myocardial Infarction, Bradyarrhythmia, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Atrial Tachycardia, Post MI Syndrome

Uninsured Heart Patients Often Face Daunting Bills

Posted 7 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 13, 2017 – A life-threatening heart emergency can spell financial doom for people who don't have health insurance, a pair of new studies shows. Around 4 out of 5 uninsured patients hospitalized for a heart attack, stroke or heart bypass surgery faced financial ruin before the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was passed in 2010, the researchers reported. "Medical expenses are the No. 1 cause of bankruptcy in the United States," said Dr. Rohan Khera, lead researcher of one study and a cardiology fellow at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. "The uninsured are particularly vulnerable." Both studies relied on the National Inpatient Sample, the largest publicly available inpatient health care database in the United States. One study focused on the financial toll of heart attacks and strokes, while the other examined the impact of heart bypass operations. ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis

Younger People With Diabetes Have 7 Times Greater Risk of Sudden Heart Death

Posted 7 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 13, 2017 – People younger than 50 with diabetes have a seven-times higher risk of dying from sudden cardiac death, preliminary research suggests. And their risk of dying from any kind of heart disease is eight times higher than for those without diabetes, the long-term Danish study also found. "It is important that healthcare providers are aware that young patients with diabetes have an elevated risk of mortality and that this is mainly explained by an increased risk of sudden cardiac death," said the study's lead author Jesper Svane, a medical student at Copenhagen University Hospital in Denmark. Sudden cardiac death is caused by malfunctions in the heart's electrical system. It often occurs without warning, according to the American Heart Association. Dr. James Catanese, chief of cardiology at Northern Westchester Hospital in Mount Kisco, N.Y., said he wasn't surprised ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Obesity, Diabetes, Type 2, Hypertension, Insulin, Heart Disease, Diabetes, Type 1, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus, Ischemic Heart Disease, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance

Healthier Diet, Less Salt: The Recipe to Beat High Blood Pressure

Posted 8 days ago by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Nov. 12, 2017 - Cutting back on salt, along with following the highly recommended "DASH" diet, can beat back high blood pressure in adults, new research shows. After just a month, the results for people adopting this strategy were "striking and reinforce the importance of dietary changes" for those with problematic blood pressure. So says a team of researchers led by Dr. Stephen Juraschek, of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. Millions of Americans fight a daily battle with high blood pressure, which can greatly increase their odds for stroke and other heart events. What's the best dietary strategy to lower those blood pressure numbers? One key factor that's long been linked to blood pressure is salt (sodium) intake. In the new study, 412 people with high blood pressure (or in danger of high blood pressure) were assigned to one of three daily salt-intake regimens. ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Heart Disease, Sodium Chloride, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Hyper-Sal, HalfLytely and Bisacodyl, Rhinaris, Potassium Chloride/Sodium Chloride, Saline Nasal Mist, Thermotabs, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Dextrose/Sodium Chloride, Ayr Saline Nasal, Thermoject, Saljet Rinse, Pediamist, Little Noses

Many Women Miss Out on Lifesaving CPR

Posted 9 days ago by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, Nov. 11, 2017 – America's hang-ups over sexuality and gender could cost women their lives when their heart suddenly stops, a new study suggests. Simply put, women suffering from cardiac arrest in a public setting are less likely to get lifesaving CPR from a passerby than men are, researchers reported. "When it comes to life and death, we need to reassure the public that we're not worrying about what seems socially inappropriate or taboo," said senior study author Dr. Benjamin Abella. He is director of the University of Pennsylvania's Center for Resuscitation Science. "The situation requires action, and it requires people to not hesitate. A life is on the line," Abella added. But the study showed people do hesitate, especially when the victim is a woman. About 45 percent of men who suffered cardiac arrest in a public setting received CPR from a bystander, compared with only 39 ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome

The Heart Risks of a Desk Job

Posted 11 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 10, 2017 – Your comfortable recliner and state-of-the-art office chair may be increasing your risk for heart disease. A sedentary lifestyle can raise cholesterol and threaten heart health. If you have a desk job, it's especially important to counter long bouts of sitting with an hourly 5-minute exercise break, even if you stay within your office. If you work long hours within the confines of a small cubicle, you'll need to be creative to find ways to get your blood flowing. Here's how. Shake up daily habits. Leave the perfect parking spot for someone else. Parking farther away from your building will give you a chance to stretch your legs before and after a long day at work. Instead of sitting in the cafeteria during lunch, head outside to walk, talk and eat with your co-workers. You'll feel refreshed and ready to take on the second half of the day. Rather than scheduling ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Angina, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease

About Half of Americans Get Health Care in ER

Posted 17 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 3, 2017 – When Americans need medical care, almost one in two people choose the emergency room, a new study reveals. "I was stunned by the results. This really helps us better understand health care in this country," said Dr. David Marcozzi. He is an associate professor in the University of Maryland's department of emergency medicine. "This research underscores the fact that emergency departments are critical to our nation's health care delivery system," Marcozzi said in a university news release. "Patients seek care in emergency departments for many reasons. The data might suggest that emergency care provides the type of care that individuals actually want or need, 24 hours a day," he added. The analysis of data from several national sources showed that there were more than 3.5 billion emergency department visits, outpatient visits, and hospital admissions during the 1996 ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Ischemic Heart Disease

Sugary Drinks Increase Heart Disease Risk

Posted 18 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 2, 2017 – If you're a fan of sodas, fruit juices and sugary sports drinks, you're probably not doing your heart any favors. A new review suggests that regularly quenching your thirst with sugar-sweetened beverages not only contributes to your risk of gaining weight, it also ups your chances of developing type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome, a cluster of conditions that raises your risk of heart disease. "Some studies found that consuming as few as two servings of sugar-sweetened beverages a week was linked to [an increased risk of metabolic syndrome, diabetes and heart disease and stroke]," said study senior author Faadiel Essop, a professor at Stellenbosch University in South Africa. "Others found that drinking at least one sugar-sweetened beverage per day was associated with elevated blood pressure," he said, and added that even more alarmingly, some studies found ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Diabetes, Type 2, Heart Disease, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis

How Your Thyroid Could Be Working Against Your Heart

Posted 31 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 31, 2017 – The tiny thyroid gland could have a big impact on heart health, new research suggests. Middle-aged and older adults with an elevated thyroid hormone may be at higher risk of heart disease and death, researchers found. In the new Dutch study, high and even high-normal levels of a hormone called free thyroxine (FT4) doubled the odds of having calcification of the coronary arteries. This can be a sign of atherosclerosis, commonly called hardening of the arteries. Higher FT4 levels were also linked to an 87 percent greater risk of having a heart attack or stroke and twice the risk of dying from one. "High FT4 is indicative of an overactive thyroid," explained lead researcher Dr. Arjola Bano, of Erasmus University in Rotterdam. FT4 is produced in the thyroid gland at the front of the neck. It helps control the body's rate of energy use, she said. Atherosclerosis ... Read more

Related support groups: Levothyroxine, Synthroid, Hypothyroidism, Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Underactive Thyroid, Hypothyroidism - After Thyroid Removal, Angina, Hyperthyroidism, Levoxyl, Myocardial Infarction, Levothroid, Eltroxin, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Tirosint, Euthyrox, Atherosclerosis, Levothyrox, Oroxine

Kids' High Blood Pressure Often Overlooked

Posted 30 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 30, 2017 – One in every 30 children in the United States has high blood pressure. Now, new guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics may help doctors screen children 3 years and older for the condition. "We are seeing it at far younger ages than we used to," said Dr. Thomas Dispenza, a cardiologist with Penn State Children's Heart Group. "As obesity rates have risen, we have also seen more complications from it." But "detection rates are shockingly low. Three-quarters of cases are overlooked, and that's a real problem," Dispenza said in a Penn State Health news release. Children with high blood pressure can develop the same long-term health problems as adults. "It can set kids up for strokes later in life by damaging the blood vessels," Dispenza said. The guidelines encourage doctors to check blood pressure at every well-child visit. For better accuracy, medical ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Heart Disease, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Is Successful Heart Surgery All in the Timing?

Posted 27 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 26, 2017 – Planning to have open heart surgery anytime soon? You might want to ask your cardiologist to book an afternoon slot in the OR. New research shows that heart operations performed in the afternoon produced better outcomes than those done in the morning. Because afternoon heart surgery syncs with the body's circadian clock (the internal body clock that controls when people sleep, eat and wake up), it reduces the risk of heart damage, the French researchers said. "Currently, there are few other surgical options to reduce the risk of post-surgery heart damage, meaning new techniques to protect patients are needed," said study author Dr. David Montaigne, a professor at the University of Lille. In one part of the study, his team tracked the medical records of nearly 600 people who had heart valve replacement surgery for 500 days, to identify any major cardiac events ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Cardiothoracic Surgery

Do Statins Raise Odds for Type 2 Diabetes?

Posted 24 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 24, 2017 – Cholesterol-lowering medications known as statins may lower your risk of heart disease, but also might boost the odds you'll develop type 2 diabetes, new research suggests. "In a group of people at high risk of type 2 diabetes, statins do seem to increase the risk of developing diabetes by about 30 percent," said the study's lead author, Dr. Jill Crandall. She's a professor of medicine and director of the diabetes clinical trials unit at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City. But, she added, that doesn't mean anyone should give up on statins. "The benefits of statins in terms of cardiovascular risk are so strong and so well established that our recommendation isn't that people should stop taking statins, but people should be monitored for the development of diabetes while on a statin," she explained. At least one other diabetes expert agreed that ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Heart Disease, Lipitor, Simvastatin, Atorvastatin, Crestor, Pravastatin, Insulin Resistance, Lovastatin, Zocor, Pre-Diabetes, Rosuvastatin, Red Yeast Rice, Pravachol, Livalo, Diabetes Mellitus, Ischemic Heart Disease, Lescol XL, Lescol, Mevacor

More Evidence That Depression Shortens Lives

Posted 23 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 23, 2017 – People with depression tend to die earlier than expected – a pattern that has grown stronger among women in recent years, new research finds. The study followed thousands of Canadian adults between 1952 and 2011. Overall, it found people with depression had a higher death rate versus those without the mood disorder. The link only emerged among women starting in the 1990s. Yet by the end of the study, depression was affecting men's and women's longevity equally. The findings do not prove that depression itself shaves years off people's lives, said lead researcher Stephen Gilman. The study could not account for the effects of physical health conditions, for example. "So one explanation could be that people with depression were more likely to have a chronic condition," said Gilman, of the U.S. National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. But even if ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Major Depressive Disorder, Heart Disease, Ischemic Stroke, Dysthymia, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Ischemic Heart Disease

Heart Disease, Stroke Cutting Black Lives Short

Posted 23 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 23, 2017 – Black Americans have a shorter life expectancy than whites, and higher rates of heart disease and stroke may be a major reason why, a new American Heart Association statement suggests. In recent years, life expectancy for blacks was over three years less than for whites – 75.5 years vs. almost 79 years, according to the statement, which was based on a review of more than 300 studies. Black people have a higher rate of heart attacks, sudden cardiac arrest, heart failure and strokes. Between 1999 and 2010, heart disease and stroke contributed to more than 2 million years of life lost among black people, the researchers said. Heart disease and stroke risk factors such as high blood pressure, obesity and diabetes also start at an earlier age among black people than white people, the review found. For example, 14 percent of black children have high blood pressure, ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Ischemic Stroke, Heart Failure, Congestive Heart Failure, Left Ventricular Dysfunction, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Ischemic Heart Disease, Left Ventriculography

Even a Little Walking Can Lengthen Your Life

Posted 19 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 19, 2017 – That evening stroll you take after dinner most nights may be doing you more good than you realize – new research suggests even a bit of regular walking can reduce your risk of death. "Walking has been described as the 'perfect exercise' because it is simple, free, convenient, doesn't require any special equipment or training, and can be done at any age," said study leader Alpa Patel, a cancer epidemiologist from the American Cancer Society. "With the near doubling of adults aged 65 and older expected by 2030, clinicians should encourage patients to walk even if less than the recommended amount, especially as they age, for health and longevity," Patel said in a society news release. Previous research has linked regular walking with a lower risk of heart disease, diabetes, and breast and colon cancers. However, many American adults don't get the recommended ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Diabetes, Type 2, Cancer, Smoking, Heart Disease, Smoking Cessation, Pre-Diabetes, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes Mellitus, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance

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