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Related terms: Cardiomyopathy, ischemic, Ischemic Cardiomyopathy

Tennis Anyone? It May Prolong Your Life

Posted 9 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 29, 2016 – If you want to try to extend your life, a new study suggests that taking up racquet sports might help. Researchers found that people who played racquet sports – badminton, squash, tennis – had an almost 50 percent lower risk of dying from any cause during the 15-year study. And playing a racquet sport was linked to a 56 percent lower risk of death from heart disease during the study period. "Our findings indicate that it's not only how much and how often, but also what type of exercise you do that seems to make the difference," said study senior author Emmanuel Stamatakis. He is an associate professor at the University of Sydney, Australia. "Participation in specific sports may have various benefits for health. These observations with the existing evidence should support the sport community together with other sectors to design and implement effective ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Angina, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease

Doctors Should Counsel Even Low-Risk Patients on Heart Health

Posted 9 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 29, 2016 – Primary care doctors should offer counseling about healthy lifestyle habits to prevent heart disease – even to adults who have a low or average risk of developing heart troubles, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force advises. The task force is an influential, independent panel of national experts in prevention and evidence-based medicine. "For people who are not at increased risk for heart disease, counseling on healthy eating and physical activity may help prevent heart disease for some people," task force vice chair Susan Curry said in a panel news release. Curry is dean of the University of Iowa College of Public Health. This latest draft recommendation reaffirms a prior advisory from the task force in 2012. "The task force encourages primary care professionals to individualize this counseling and consider offering it to adults who are interested in and ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Ischemic Stroke, Insulin Resistance, Transient Ischemic Attack, Pre-Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Ischemic Heart Disease, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance

Does a Little Daily Drinking Really Help the Heart?

Posted 10 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 29, 2016 – Many studies have hinted that alcohol, in moderation, can do a heart good. But new research suggests that moderate drinkers are no more likely than teetotalers to have clear arteries. The scientists looked at almost 2,000 patients who underwent CT angiography – an imaging test that detects "plaques" in heart arteries. Overall, there was no association between people's drinking habits and their odds of showing clogged vessels. The findings stand in contrast to past studies that have linked moderate drinking to a lower risk of heart disease – where plaques build up in the heart arteries and may eventually trigger a heart attack. Researchers said an advantage of the new study is that it used objective measurements. "No prior studies have assessed the relationship between alcohol consumption and the presence of coronary heart disease as depicted by coronary CT ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Heart Disease, Heart Failure, Congestive Heart Failure, Alcohol Dependence, Alcoholism, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Left Ventricular Dysfunction, Hangover, Ischemic Heart Disease, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Acute Alcohol Intoxication

Hearts of Healthy People With Gene Mutations May Be 'Primed to Fail'

Posted 16 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 23, 2016 – Certain gene mutations can increase the risk of heart failure in healthy people, researchers report. It had been believed that gene mutations in a protein called titin affect only people with dilated cardiomyopathy, one of the most common forms of inherited heart disease. But this study of more than 1,400 adults found that the hearts of healthy people with mutations in this gene may be "primed to fail" if affected by other genetic or environmental factors. About 35 million people worldwide may be at risk, the researchers said. "Our previous work showed that mutations in the titin gene are very common in people diagnosed with heart failure. Around 1 percent of the general population also carry these mutations, but until now it wasn't known if these are 'silent' gene changes or changes that can adversely affect the heart," said co-author Dr. Antonio de Marvao ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Cardiomyopathy, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Diagnosis and Investigation, Ischemic Heart Disease, Cardiomyopathy Prophylaxis

These Medicines Often Send Americans to ERs

Posted 16 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 22, 2016 – An estimated one in 250 Americans lands in the hospital emergency department each year because of a medication-related reaction or problem, a new federal study finds. Among adults 65 and older, the rate is about one in 100, the study authors said. Remarkably, the medicines causing the most trouble haven't changed in a decade, the researchers noted. Blood thinners, diabetes medicines and antibiotics top the list. These drugs accounted for 47 percent of emergency department visits for adverse drug events in 2013 and 2014, according to the analysis. Among older adults, blood thinners, diabetes medicines and opioid painkillers are implicated in nearly 60 percent of emergency department visits for adverse drug events. "The same drugs are causing the most problems," said study co-author Dr. Daniel Budnitz. The study doesn't tease out what went wrong. The reasons ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Oxycodone, Diabetes, Type 2, Back Pain, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, Tramadol, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Opana, Warfarin, Coumadin, Subutex

CDC Reveals Top 5 Causes of Death

Posted 18 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 17, 2016 – Heart disease tops the list of what's most likely to kill you or someone you love, U.S. health officials reported Thursday. The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released data naming the five leading causes of death among Americans under age 80 for 2014. After heart disease, cancer was the most likely cause of death. Rounding out the list were stroke; chronic lower respiratory diseases, such as asthma, bronchitis and emphysema; and accidents, the report said. Nearly two-thirds of deaths in the United States were caused by these five diseases or conditions. And many of these deaths were preventable. Thirty percent of heart disease deaths, 15 percent of cancer deaths, 28 percent of stroke deaths, 36 percent of chronic lower respiratory disease deaths, and 43 percent of accident deaths were preventable, the CDC researchers said. The good news in ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Heart Disease, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Breast Cancer, Heart Attack, Bronchitis, Pneumonia, Lung Cancer, Myocardial Infarction, Bronchiectasis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis

'Yo-Yo Dieting' Hard on Older Women's Hearts: Study

Posted 17 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 17, 2016 – Millions of Americans have a lifelong struggle with their waistlines – dieting, losing weight, but then gaining it back again. It's a pattern known as "yo-yo dieting," and a new study suggests it does no favors for older women's hearts. "Women with a normal [weight] who experience yo-yo dieting throughout their adult life are at increased risk of sudden cardiac death and coronary heart disease death," said study leader Dr. Somwail Rasla. The risk of sudden cardiac death was nearly 3.5 times higher, and the risk for death linked to coronary heart disease was 66 percent higher, according to Rasla. He's an internal medicine resident at Memorial Hospital of Rhode Island in Pawtucket. Experts have long known that being overweight at midlife is linked with a higher risk of death from heart disease. It can also boost the chances for sudden cardiac death, a condition ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Weight Loss, Myocardial Infarction, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome

Could Common Heartburn Drugs Up Stroke Risk?

Posted 15 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 15, 2016 – A popular category of heartburn medications – including Nexium, Prevacid, Prilosec and Protonix – may increase your risk of stroke, a new study suggests. Known as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), these drugs increased people's overall stroke risk by 21 percent, said study lead author Dr. Thomas Sehested. However, the risk appears to be driven by people who take high doses, added Sehested, research director at the Danish Heart Foundation in Copenhagen. "People treated with a low dose of PPIs did not have a high risk of stroke," he said. "Those treated with the highest doses of PPIs had the highest risk of stroke." The extent of risk also depends on the specific PPI taken. At the highest dose, stroke risk ranged from 30 percent for lansoprazole (Prevacid) to 94 percent for pantoprazole (Protonix), the researchers said. Takeda Pharmaceutical, the maker of ... Read more

Related support groups: GERD, Heart Disease, Ischemic Stroke, Omeprazole, Nexium, Dementia, Prilosec, Zantac, Protonix, Indigestion, Pantoprazole, Alzheimer's Disease, Ranitidine, Lansoprazole, Dexilant, Prevacid, Transient Ischemic Attack, Pepcid, Barrett's Esophagus, Aciphex

Too Few U.S. Adults Have CPR Training

Posted 15 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 15, 2016 – Fewer than one in five American adults has current training in CPR, and that rate is even lower among older adults, a new study finds. Immediate CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) after sudden cardiac arrest can double or triple a person's chances of survival. In cardiac arrest, a person's heart suddenly stops beating. A telephone survey of more than 9,000 adults 18 and older found that only 18 percent were currently trained in CPR delivery. About 65 percent said they had received CPR training at some time. The likelihood of ever having had CPR training was 43 percent higher among those with higher levels of education and 7 percent higher among those with higher household incomes. Adults 50 and older were half as likely to be CPR-trained as younger adults. "Cardiac arrest occurs among people in their 50s and 60s, and most cardiac arrests occur in the home, yet ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis

Migraine and Stroke Risk Linked Again

Posted 15 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 15, 2016 – Women who experience migraines have more than double the risk of suffering a stroke, new research shows. The finding adds evidence to the suspected link between these two conditions. Although it's not yet clear why this connection may exist, study lead author Dr. Cecil Rambarat said it's important for health care providers to be aware of the link. "This is important since migraine is generally not considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease," said Rambarat. He's a resident physician at the University of Florida Shands Hospital in Gainesville. "Maybe providers need to factor in migraine headaches as a potential risk factor for cardiovascular disease among women," he said. "This is not being done currently." Previous research has linked migraines – especially the form known as migraine with aura – to stroke. Migraine with aura is estimated to affect one ... Read more

Related support groups: Plan B, Migraine, Mirena, Sprintec, NuvaRing, Provera, Nexplanon, Implanon, Depo-Provera, Ortho Tri-Cyclen, Tri-Sprintec, Yasmin, Microgestin Fe 1/20, Loestrin 24 Fe, Heart Disease, Ortho Evra, Smoking, Plan B One-Step, TriNessa, High Cholesterol

CPR Simulator May Boost Nurses' Skills

Posted 15 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 15, 2016 – Regular simulation training improves emergency department nurses' CPR skills, a new study shows. Currently, hospital health-care workers are only required to undergo formal training in CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) every two years, according to the study authors. This isn't often enough, they said at the American Heart Association's annual meeting, which concluded Tuesday in New Orleans. "High-quality CPR is essential for functional survival from cardiac arrest. However, the opportunity to perform CPR is too infrequent currently to maintain proficiency for most providers," lead author Dr. Michael Kurz said in an AHA news release. He's an associate professor of emergency medicine at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. He and his colleagues placed two mobile CPR simulation stations in the emergency department of the University of Alabama at Birmingham ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease

Trouble Sleeping Tied to Higher Risk for Irregular Heartbeat

Posted 14 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 14, 2016 – There may be yet another reason to try and get a good night's sleep: New research ties poor sleep to a higher odds for a dangerous irregular heartbeat. The condition in question is called atrial fibrillation, a common heart arrhythmia that is strongly tied to an increased risk for clotting and strokes. Now, two studies suggest that trouble getting your Zzzs may raise the risk for atrial fibrillation. One cardiologist who reviewed the studies said the theory may have merit. While neither study could prove cause-and-effect, changes in a person's physiology by a "disturbed sleep cycle may be the mechanism for development and recurrence of atrial fibrillation," said Dr. Jianqing Li. She's a cardiologist at Winthrop-University Hospital in Mineola, N.Y. In one study, a team led by Dr. Gregory Marcus of the University of California, San Francisco, tracked data from ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Heart Disease, Atrial Fibrillation, Arrhythmia, Transient Ischemic Attack, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Cardiac Arrhythmia, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Ischemic Heart Disease

Weight-Loss Surgery Tied to Lower Heart Risks

Posted 14 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 14, 2016 – Weight-loss surgery may significantly reduce obese people's risk of heart failure, a new study indicates. Researchers compared more than 25,800 obese people who had weight-loss (bariatric) surgery with more than 13,700 obese people who tried to lose weight through a program of major lifestyle changes. Both groups had no history of heart failure. Four years after the start of treatment, the weight-loss surgery group had lost more weight, had a nearly 50 percent lower risk of heart failure, and had lower rates of heart rhythm problems, diabetes and high blood pressure than the lifestyle-changes group, the findings showed. Both groups had similar rates of heart attack and death, according to the study, which was scheduled for presentation Monday at the American Heart Association (AHA) annual meeting, in New Orleans. "Our study shows an association between obesity ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Obesity, Hypertension, Heart Disease, Weight Loss, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Gastric Bypass Surgery, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes Mellitus, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Gastrointestinal Surgery, Hypertensive Heart Disease

U.S. Heart Disease Rates Fell 20 Percent Since 1980s: Study

Posted 13 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Nov. 13, 2016 – New research shows that cases of heart disease have dropped 20 percent in the United States in the last four decades. Experts credit the trend to better detection and prevention of risk factors that endanger heart health. "That means all the efforts are paying off," said senior researcher Michael Pencina. He is director of biostatistics for the Duke Clinical Research Institute at Duke University, in Durham, N.C. However, most major heart risk factors – bad cholesterol, high blood pressure and smoking – remain strong contributors to heart disease, showing that more can be done to protect patients, Pencina added. "Coronary disease was the size of a large pizza, but now it's a medium pizza," Pencina said. "But in terms of slices, what portion of the pizza you can attribute to the risk factors, it's about the same," he explained. "There is definitely room for ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Heart Disease, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes Mellitus, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance

Hypochondriacs May Worry Themselves Into Heart Trouble

Posted 4 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 3, 2016 – Constantly worrying about having a heart attack may make it more likely you'll have one, Norwegian researchers report. In fact, people dubbed the "worried well" were twice as likely to develop chest pain or have a heart attack compared to those who weren't anxious about their health, the new study found. "People with high levels of health anxiety have about a 70 percent increased risk of heart disease, after taking [into] account other known risk factors," said lead researcher Dr. Line Iden Berge. She's from the division of psychiatry at the University of Bergen in Norway. Even relatively low levels of health anxiety can increase the risk, compared to people without symptoms of health anxiety, she said. This study, however, wasn't designed to prove that fretting over your health caused heart problems, only that these things seemed to be associated. Because ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Panic Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Heart Disease, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease

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Myocardial Infarction, Heart Attack, Angina, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Heart Disease