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Related terms: Cardiomyopathy, ischemic, Ischemic Cardiomyopathy

Even a Little More Activity Could Save Millions of Lives

Posted 2 days 2 hours ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 22, 2017 – Just a half-hour of physical activity a day could prevent millions of early deaths and cases of heart disease worldwide, a new study says. "Meeting physical activity guidelines by walking for as little as 30 minutes most days of the week has a substantial benefit, and higher physical activity is associated with even lower risks," said study lead author Scott Lear. Lear is a professor in the faculty of health sciences at Simon Fraser University in British Columbia, Canada. He and his colleagues analyzed survey responses from more than 130,000 people aged 35-70 in 17 countries. Participants were asked about their levels of physical activity, then they were followed for nearly seven years. The researchers concluded that 1 in 20 cases of heart disease and 1 in 12 premature deaths could be prevented if everyone met World Health Organization guidelines. WHO ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Weight Loss, Heart Disease, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease

Wrongly Focusing On The Airway Can Cost Athletes' Lives in Cardiac Arrest

Posted 5 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 19, 2017 – Athletes are dying from cardiac arrests that occur during play because teammates, coaches and other bystanders don't know how to best save their lives, a new study claims. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) applied immediately can give these athletes a fighting chance, but onlookers failed to provide CPR in three out of five cases, according to a review of more than two dozen game videos. Bystanders instead most often tried to keep the athlete from swallowing his or her tongue, acting on the widespread misconception that this must be done to prevent a person in cardiac arrest from asphyxiating, said lead researcher Dana Viskin. She is with the Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center and Sackler School of Medicine at Tel Aviv University in Israel. "Athletes, especially professional athletes, are receiving poor CPR because the first responders – that is, their fellow ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Arrhythmia, Myocardial Infarction, Cardiac Arrest, Ischemic Heart Disease, Cardiogenic Shock, Asystole, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome

Death Risk From Triathlons May Be Higher Than Thought

Posted 6 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 18, 2017 – Could some triathlon participants be pushing themselves too hard? New research suggests the odds that an athlete will die during these tests of endurance are higher than previously believed. "We identified a total of 135 deaths and cardiac arrests in U.S. triathlons from the inception of the sport in 1985 through 2016," said study lead author Dr. Kevin Harris. Most were due to undiagnosed heart issues. "The vast majority of the deaths occurred in the swim," added Harris, a cardiologist with the Minneapolis Heart Institute at Abbott Northwestern Hospital. Researchers also discovered that race-related fatalities most often involved middle-aged or older men. And the investigators found that sudden death, cardiac arrest, and trauma-related death during triathlons are not rare. Overall, risk of dying during a triathlon was 1.74 for every 100,000 athletes – the ... Read more

Related support groups: Atrial Fibrillation, Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease

'Upside' to Diabetes Really Isn't

Posted 11 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 13, 2017 – Type 2 diabetes can reduce your chances for a rare but potentially fatal weakness of blood vessels, a new study says. But while this may sound like good news, it's not. Swedish investigators found that type 2 diabetes significantly decreases the long-term risks of aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection, two conditions that can lead to internal bleeding due to rupture of blood vessels. But the mechanism that reduces risk for these rare conditions also increases your risk of developing hardened arteries, a much more serious health problem that can lead to heart attack and stroke. "We have to make sure people don't think, 'Oh, good, I have diabetes type 2, this is good news – because it's not," said Dr. Derek Brinster, director of aortic surgery at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. "You are at high risk if you have diabetes type 2 for dying earlier than you ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Aortic Aneurysm, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Thromboembolic Stroke Prophylaxis, Ischemic Heart Disease, Aortic Insufficiency

Recession Took Toll on Health of Rural Young Blacks

Posted 18 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 6, 2017 – The Great Recession of 2007-2009 may have hit black American teens in poor rural communities particularly hard, a new study suggests. What the researchers discovered was that these young people now appear to be at increased risk for heart disease and diabetes. The recession was the largest in the United States since the Great Depression in the 1930s, the study authors noted. And many in rural black communities in the Southeast have yet to recover lost jobs, social services and wealth, the researchers explained. This study included 328 black participants, aged 25 to 26. During the recession, they were 16 and 17, and lived in nine rural counties in Georgia with high poverty rates and high heart disease death rates. The investigators examined rates of metabolic syndrome, a group of risk factors for heart disease and diabetes. Those risk factors include a large ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Heart Disease, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance

Play It Smart: Stay in School for a Healthier Heart

Posted 31 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 31, 2017 – Higher education has been linked to better jobs, greater pay and, now, even a healthier heart. People who spend more years in school have a lower risk for heart disease, according to an international team of researchers from the University of Lausanne in Switzerland, University College London, and the University of Oxford in England. "Increasing the number of years that people spend in the educational system may lower their risk of subsequently developing coronary heart disease by a substantial degree," the researchers wrote. The study results were published online Aug. 30 in the BMJ. The message to policymakers: "Increasing educational attainment in the general population" could improve the public's health, Taavi Tillmann, of University College London's department of epidemiology and public health, and colleagues said in a journal news release. Previous ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease

Bystander CPR Less Likely in Black Neighborhoods

Posted 30 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 30, 2017 – If your heart suddenly stops beating, the racial makeup of the neighborhood may determine the likelihood of receiving CPR from a passer-by or having access to a public defibrillator, researchers say. These lifesaving treatments for cardiac arrest occur less often in black neighborhoods in the United States, researchers discovered. Delaying CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) can dramatically reduce the odds of surviving cardiac arrest. "We have known that there are differences in the rates of survival from cardiac arrest between blacks and whites, but it was surprising to see how the demographics of a neighborhood affected outcomes of residents who experience cardiac arrest," said Dr. Monique Starks, the study's lead author. She's a cardiologist at the Duke Clinical Research Institute in Durham, N.C. "This is absolutely a call to action to improve and expand ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Angina, Myocardial Infarction, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Ischemic Heart Disease, Cardiac Arrest, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis

Marriage a Blessing for Heart Attack Patients

Posted 29 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 29, 2017 – Marriage is good medicine for someone who has a heart attack. That's the conclusion of a study that tracked nearly 1 million British patients for 13 years. The researchers found that married patients who had a heart attack were 14 percent more likely to survive until the end of the study than singles. And compared to divorced patients, survival odds for wedded folks were 16 percent higher, said study senior author Dr. Rahul Potluri. He's a clinical lecturer at Aston University Medical School in Birmingham, England. "Marriage is a proxy for psychological risk factors which are important for ensuring compliance to medication," Potluri said. In other words, the social and physical support a spouse can provide translates to significant health benefits. For instance, marriage appears to have a positive effect on the three largest risk factors for heart disease – ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Hypertension, Heart Disease, High Cholesterol, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Hypertensive Heart Disease

More Than Half of Americans Will Need Nursing Home Care: Study

Posted 28 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 28, 2017 – More than half of Americans will find themselves in a nursing home at some point in their lives, a new study shows. That eclipses the 35 percent estimate used by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the researchers added. "Lifetime use of nursing homes is considerably greater than previously thought, mostly due to an increase in short stays of less than three weeks," said lead researcher Michael Hurd. He is director of the RAND Center for the Study of Aging, in Santa Monica, Calif. Increased nursing home care begs the question of who will pay for it and how will they pay for it, he said. "Out-of-pocket spending is not particularly large, on average, but the risk of long stays and of correspondingly large out-of-pocket spending is fairly large – 5 percent of patients will spend more than 1,500 days in a nursing home, and 5 percent will spend more ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Osteoporosis, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Prevention of Falls

New Drug, Canakinumab, May Fight Heart Disease in Whole New Way

Posted 28 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 28, 2017 – Move over, statins: New research finds that a medication aimed at dampening the body's inflammatory response may be a new tool to curb heart disease. The findings were presented Sunday at the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress in Barcelona, Spain, and published in two major medical journals, The Lancet and the New England Journal of Medicine. The trial focused on a new drug called canakinumab, which lowered by 15 percent the overall rate of heart events such as heart attack, stroke and cardiovascular death in people who'd already had a heart attack. The people in the study also had high levels of a compound called C-reactive protein in their blood – a marker that is indicative of a heightened inflammatory response. For years, heart researchers have wondered if a drug that lowered inflammation might help curb heart disease. Cardiologists had mixed ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, High Cholesterol, Heart Attack, Lipitor, Simvastatin, Crestor, Atorvastatin, Pravastatin, Zocor, Lovastatin, Myocardial Infarction, Rosuvastatin, Hypertriglyceridemia, Pravachol, Livalo, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Red Yeast Rice, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Thromboembolic Stroke Prophylaxis, Lescol

After Heart Attack, Just 1 in 3 Go for Rehab: CDC

Posted 24 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 24, 2017 – Only one in three heart attack survivors in the United States goes for outpatient cardiac rehabilitation, government health officials report. Despite guidelines that recommend rehab for reducing the risk of future heart attacks, it's greatly underused, according to statistics released Thursday by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Each year, about 790,000 U.S. adults have heart attacks, of which 210,000 are repeat heart attacks, the CDC report said. Exercise counseling, healthy heart lifestyle advice and stress-reduction tips – which are part of cardiac rehab – help reduce those odds of recurrence. There's another advantage as well: extended medical supervision after discharge, the researchers said. The report was led by Dr. Jing Fang, of the CDC's division for heart disease and stroke prevention. Fang's team analyzed health survey data ... Read more

Related support groups: Lisinopril, Metoprolol, Heart Disease, Atenolol, Losartan, Heart Attack, Benicar, Diovan, Bystolic, Angina, Ramipril, Bisoprolol, Cozaar, Enalapril, Valsartan, Micardis, Benazepril, Toprol-XL, Avapro, Atacand

More Support for Tight Blood Pressure Control

Posted 23 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 23, 2017 – For people at increased risk of heart disease, intensive blood pressure control may be just as safe as standard treatment, a new study finds. Experts said the results bolster the case for more aggressive treatment of high blood pressure. Two years ago, a U.S. government-funded trial called SPRINT challenged the standard approach to treating high blood pressure. Intensive control meant using medication to get patients' systolic pressure – the top number – below 120 mm Hg. That was a big change from standard treatment, where the aim is to get below 140 mm Hg, or in some cases 150. Driving down blood pressure to lower levels had major benefits for people at increased risk of heart attack. That included people age 75 and older, and patients with existing heart disease or multiple risk factors for it such as smoking and high cholesterol. Overall, the aggressive ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Lisinopril, Hypertension, Metoprolol, Smoking, Heart Disease, Atenolol, Losartan, High Cholesterol, Heart Attack, Propranolol, Hydrochlorothiazide, Benicar, Diovan, Smoking Cessation, Bystolic, Carvedilol, Ramipril, Bisoprolol, Inderal

Doctor-Patient Dialogue May Boost Use of Blood Pressure Drugs

Posted 22 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 22, 2017 – Doctors can help boost use of high blood pressure medications by their poor patients simply by talking to them, a new study suggests. Many people fail to take their blood pressure-lowering drugs, putting them at higher risk of heart attack and stroke, the American Heart Association says. But by communicating more effectively and talking to patients about their specific challenges, physicians may improve medication use, researchers found. "Health care providers should talk to patients about the things that get in the way of taking their medication, such as relationship status, employment and housing," said Antoinette Schoenthaler, the study's lead author. "Unemployment, for example, affects whether patients can afford medication, which is a primary risk factor for non-adherence," said Schoenthaler, an associate professor of medicine at New York University School ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Lisinopril, Hypertension, Metoprolol, Heart Disease, Atenolol, Losartan, Benicar, Diovan, Spironolactone, Bystolic, Ramipril, Bisoprolol, Cozaar, Enalapril, Valsartan, Micardis, Benazepril, Toprol-XL, Avapro

Health Tip: Get Moving and Stay Active

Posted 22 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

-- The American Heart Association recommends exercise for at least 30 minutes a day. Walking is one of the easiest ways to improve heart health, but there are other ways to stay fit at home. Here are the association's suggestions: Do housework yourself instead of hiring someone else. Work in the garden or mow the grass. Using a riding mower doesn't count. Go for a short walk before breakfast or after dinner. Work up to a walk of 30 minutes. Walk or bike to the corner store instead of driving. When watching TV, sit up instead of lying on the sofa. Better yet, spend a few minutes pedaling on your stationary bike. Stand up while talking on the phone. Walk the dog. Park farther away at the shopping mall. Keep exercise equipment working, and use it. Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Heart Disease, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease

Heart Risk Up if Hospitalized for Pneumonia or Sepsis

Posted 12 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 11, 2017 – Adults who've been hospitalized with pneumonia or sepsis have a higher risk of heart disease, a new European study reports. Researchers examined data from nearly 237,000 Swedish men. They were followed from age 18 into middle age. The study found that those admitted to the hospital with pneumonia or sepsis (a bacterial infection of the blood) had a six times higher risk of heart disease in the following year. The rate dropped significantly during the second and third years, but was still more than double. And, by the fourth and fifth years, the risk remained almost two times higher in those who'd been hospitalized for sepsis or pneumonia compared to those who hadn't. The study was published recently in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology. While most patients with sepsis or pneumonia recover from these conditions, many still have inflammation after the ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Obesity, Lisinopril, Hypertension, Heart Disease, Losartan, Lipitor, Simvastatin, Benicar, Pneumonia, Diovan, Crestor, Atorvastatin, Pravastatin, Angina, Ramipril, Cozaar, Enalapril, Valsartan, Micardis

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Myocardial Infarction, Heart Attack, Angina, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Heart Disease