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Hepatocellular Carcinoma News

Related terms: Malignant Hepatoma, HCC

More Evidence Linking Obesity to Liver Cancer

Posted 14 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 – Having a large waistline, a high body mass index (BMI) and type 2 diabetes, may raise your risk for liver cancer, a new study suggests. "We found that each of these three factors was associated, robustly, with liver cancer risk," said study co-author Peter Campbell. He's strategic director of digestive system cancer research at the American Cancer Society. Liver cancer rates have roughly tripled in the United States since the mid-1970s, "and the prognosis for patients diagnosed with this type of cancer is especially grim," Campbell said. He and his colleagues examined data on 1.57 million adults from 14 U.S. studies to look for an association between obesity and type 2 diabetes and liver cancer. None of the participants had cancer when the study began. Over time, 6.5 percent of the participants were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, which is an obesity-related ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Cancer, Liver and Pancreatic Disease, Hepatocellular Carcinoma, Hepatic Tumor

Gene Variant May Explain Higher Rates of Some Cancers in Black People

Posted 31 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 31, 2016 – A single gene variant may explain why black Americans with common cancers have shorter survival times and higher death rates than other races, a new study suggests. While some researchers have examined possible socioeconomic factors to explain these differences, others have focused on genetics. "We may finally have a truly genetic explanation for why African-Americans are more prone to a variety of cancers," said study senior author Maureen Murphy. She is a professor and program leader in the Molecular and Cellular Oncogenesis program at the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia. "This is a variant that has never been observed in Caucasian populations, so identifying people who have this variant may be crucial for providing improved prognosis and personalized treatment that will lead to better outcomes," she said in an institute news release. In this study, ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Liver and Pancreatic Disease, Hepatocellular Carcinoma, Hepatic Tumor

Screening Inmates for Hepatitis C Benefits General Community: Study

Posted 23 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 23, 2015 – A prison-based hepatitis C screening and treatment program could benefit the broader community, researchers suggest. Besides reducing the spread of hepatitis C after prisoners are released, "universal [hepatitis C] testing and treatment in prisons would reduce outcomes of advanced [hepatitis C] such as liver cancer, end-stage liver disease and death among prisoners," said study senior author Jagpreet Chhatwal, of Massachusetts General Hospital's Institute for Technology Assessment in Boston. "We now have highly effective treatments for [hepatitis C], so we wanted to know the impact of providing routine testing and treatment to inmates, a group in which the infection is highly prevalent," Chhatwal said in a hospital news release. More than 1 percent of the U.S. population has hepatitis C, but the virus affects more than 17 percent of prisoners, the researchers ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Hepatitis C, Liver Cirrhosis, Hepatocellular Carcinoma, Liver and Pancreatic Disease, Hepatic Coma, Benign Liver Tumor, Hepatic Tumor, Liver Metastasis in Adenocarcinoma

3 Drinks Per Day May Raise Liver Cancer Risk, But Coffee Lowers It

Posted 26 Mar 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 26, 2015 – People who have three or more alcoholic drinks per day could be raising their odds for liver cancer, according to a report from a panel of experts. But there was good news for java lovers: The report, from the World Cancer Research Fund International, found "strong evidence" that drinking coffee might actually lower a person's odds for liver cancer. In drawing together the report, researchers tracked data on 8.2 million people who took part in 34 studies worldwide. There were a total of 24,500 liver cancer cases among the participants in the studies. The objective was to determine how diet, weight and physical activity affect the risk of liver cancer. The studies were gathered and reviewed by a team at Imperial College London in England, and then independently assessed by a panel of international experts. Along with the increased risk associated with having ... Read more

Related support groups: Hepatocellular Carcinoma

Aspirin May Reduce Risk of Liver Cancer, Death From Liver Disease

Posted 28 Nov 2012 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 28 – Aspirin use seems to be associated with a decreased risk of liver cancer and death from chronic liver disease, according to a large new study. This new study included more than 300,000 people aged 50 to 71, who reported their aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use and were followed for 10 to 12 years. During that time, more than 400 participants died from chronic liver disease and 250 were diagnosed with liver cancer. Compared to people who didn't take NSAIDs, people who took aspirin were 45 percent less likely to die from chronic liver disease and 41 percent less likely to be diagnosed with liver cancer. People who took non-aspirin NSAIDs were 26 percent less likely to die from chronic liver disease but no less likely to be diagnosed with liver cancer. If these findings are confirmed, they could lead to new ways to prevent chronic liver ... Read more

Related support groups: Aspirin, Ecotrin, Bayer Aspirin, Hepatocellular Carcinoma, Bufferin, Buffered Aspirin, Fasprin, Low Dose ASA, Aspergum, Easprin, Hepatic Tumor, Aspir-Low, St Joseph Aspirin, Aspirin Low Strength, ZORprin, Sloprin, Bayer Plus, Genprin, Aspirin Lite Coat, Empirin

Childhood Obesity May Raise Odds of Adult Liver Cancer

Posted 20 Apr 2012 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, April 20 – Adults who were obese as children are at increased risk for liver cancer, a new study suggests. Researchers looked at the birth weight and body-mass index (a measurement of body fat based on height and weight commonly called BMI) of more than 165,000 men and 160,000 women in Denmark born between 1930 and 1989. Of those participants, 252 developed hepatocellular carcinoma, the most common form of liver cancer in adulthood. The study authors calculated that at age 7, the risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma increased by 12 percent for every one-point increase in BMI. By age 13, that risk increased to 25 percent. Therefore, as units of BMI increased into adulthood, so did the risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma. This was consistently similar across both genders and all ages. Other factors associated with liver cancer include alcoholism, infection by ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Hepatocellular Carcinoma, Hepatic Tumor

Researchers Identify Liver Cancer Risk Factors

Posted 7 Jan 2012 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 6 – Two new studies from the Mayo Clinic find that hepatitis C infection and obesity could be to blame for a surge in liver cancer cases, which have tripled over the last 30 years. Late-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), or liver cancer, has only a 10 percent to 12 percent five-year survival rate, according to figures in a Mayo news release. The researchers say their findings could help doctors diagnose the disease earlier and save lives. Both studies appear in the January issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings "The studies illuminate the importance of identifying people with risk factors in certain populations to help catch the disease in its early, treatable stages," said Dr. W. Ray Kim, a gastroenterology and hepatology specialist and principal investigator of one study, in the release. The researchers examined several decades of medical information from the Rochester ... Read more

Related support groups: Hepatocellular Carcinoma, Hepatic Tumor

Clues to Preventing Return of Liver Cancer

Posted 29 Jun 2010 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 29 – Antiviral therapy may halt or slow recurrence of liver cancer in patients with chronic hepatitis B and extend their lives, finds a new study. Previous research has shown that antiviral therapy reduces the incidence of liver cancer in such patients. This study looked at 15 patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) who underwent the local removal of a liver tumor known as a "single hepatocellular carcinoma" (HCC) that was less than four centimeters. HCC is the most common primary malignant tumor of the liver. Six of the patients were diagnosed between 1991 and 1997, prior to the development of antiviral therapy. They were classified as historical controls. The other nine were diagnosed between 2000 and 2004 and began ongoing antiviral therapy with lamivudine immediately after HCC diagnosis. In some cases, patients were also prescribed other antiviral medications, such as ... Read more

Related support groups: Hepatitis B, Hepatocellular Carcinoma

Hepatitis Infections Behind U.S. Rise in Liver Cancer

Posted 6 May 2010 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 6 – A type of liver cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, is increasing in the United States, and health officials attribute much of the rise to untreated hepatitis infections. Chronic hepatitis B and hepatitis C are responsible for 78 percent of hepatocellular carcinoma around the world. In the United States, as many as 5.3 million people have chronic viral hepatitis and don't know it, according to the May 6 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). "The liver cancer rates are increasing in contrast to most other major forms of cancer," said Dr. John Ward, director of CDC's viral hepatitis division and co-author of the report. Viral hepatitis is a major reason for the increase, he said. The rate of hepatocellular carcinoma increased from 2.7 per 100,000 persons in 2001 to 3.2 in 2006 – an average annual increase of ... Read more

Related support groups: Hepatitis C, Hepatitis B, Hepatocellular Carcinoma

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