Skip to Content

Join the 'Head Injury' group to help and get support from people like you.

Head Injury News

Related terms: Traumatic Brain Injury, Brain Injury, TBI

High School Coaches, Players Know Little About Concussion

Posted 20 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 27, 2017 – The link between concussions and brain injury might be a hot topic in the NFL, but at the high school level? Apparently not so much. Overall, only about a third of high school athletes, their coaches and parents know that a concussion is a brain injury, according to a new study by Mayo Clinic researchers. The athletes themselves were the most likely to know that fact, the researchers found. They surveyed 115 athletes, 132 parents and 15 coaches at three high schools in Rochester, Minn. They were involved with a variety of sports – football, soccer, volleyball, hockey, basketball, wrestling, dance, gymnastics, lacrosse, baseball and softball. All of the participants completed a questionnaire designed to assess what they knew about concussions. Most people could identify the possible effects of concussion, the study found. Coaches had the most knowledge about ... Read more

Related support groups: Head Injury, Head Injury with Intracranial Hemorrhage, Head Injury w/ Intracranial Hemorrhage and Loss of Consciousness, Head Injury with Loss of Consciousness

Police Use of Rubber Bullets Can Still Be Deadly, Study Warns

Posted 19 Dec 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Dec. 18, 2017 – They may be touted as relatively harmless, but rubber and plastic bullets can cause serious injury and death, and should not be used when riots occur, researchers say. These types of bullets – widely used by police, military and security forces to disperse crowds – are meant to incapacitate people by causing pain or injury. But a team from the University of California, Berkeley, said the speed at which many rubber or plastic bullets leave the weapon is the same as live ammunition. In fact, the new study suggests "that these weapons have the potential to cause severe injuries and death," said researchers led by Dr. Rohini Haar, of UC Berkeley's School of Public Health. They looked at data from 26 published studies examining outcomes among nearly 2,000 people, mostly young adults, who suffered injuries after being hit by rubber or plastic bullets in numerous ... Read more

Related support groups: Head Injury, Wound Infection

Informed Football Refs Better at Spotting Suspected Concussions

Posted 1 Dec 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 1, 2017 – The more college football referees know about concussion symptoms, the more confident they are in calling a timeout for a suspected head injury, a new study shows. Researchers surveyed more than 1,300 college football officials during the 2015 season and found that they called an average of one injury timeout for a suspected concussion every four games. Those with greater awareness about concussion symptoms were more confident in making such calls, according to the study published online recently in The Journal of Athletic Training. "Concussion education for officials is important," said lead author Emily Kroshus, an assistant professor in University of Washington's department of pediatrics. "When officials are more aware of concussion symptoms, they are more confident in calling injury timeouts," Kroshus said in a journal news release. "Understanding the ... Read more

Related support groups: Head Injury, Head Injury with Loss of Consciousness

Health Tip: Drive Safely During a Snow Storm

Posted 30 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

-- If you don't have to drive while it's snowing, don't. But if you must be on the road, the National Weather Service suggests: Slow down. Roads may be slippery, even if they do not look wet. Clean all snow and ice off your car before starting a trip. Let someone know where you are going and what route you will take. Fully charge your cell phone before leaving home. Keep an emergency kitin the car. If you skid, ease your foot off the gas and turn your wheel in the direction you want the front of the car to go. If you have an anti-lock braking system, apply steady pressure to the brake. Never pump the brake on an ABS vehicle. If you are having trouble seeing, pull over until visibility improves. Read more

Related support groups: Head Injury, Prevention of Fractures

Motorcycle Crashes Far More Deadly Than Car Crashes

Posted 20 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 20, 2017 – Motorcycle crashes are far costlier than car accidents, both in lives lost and in medical expenses, a new study shows. Canadian researchers found that the death rate from motorcycle crashes was five times greater than from car crashes, and the rate of severe injury was 10 times greater. That came with a six times greater cost to the health care system. Though the findings stem from an analysis of traffic accidents in the Canadian province of Ontario, the researchers said that similar patterns would likely be seen elsewhere. One reason: Motorcycles are inherently more risky because motorcycles lack the protections that cars provide. "It's clear that it's much more dangerous to ride a motorcycle than to ride in a car," said lead researcher Dr. Daniel Pincus. But the study isn't saying that motorcycles should be taken off the road. "A lot of people enjoy riding ... Read more

Related support groups: Head Injury, Prevention of Fractures

Getting Self-Driving Cars on the Road Soon Might Save Lives

Posted 7 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 7, 2017 – The sooner driverless cars make their way onto American roadways, the sooner thousands of lives will be saved each year, a new report suggests. For that reason, the RAND Corporation research team that did the analysis is cautioning against delaying the introduction of driverless cars – which they call "highly automated vehicles" (HAVs) – under any misplaced premise that current technology might be somewhat less than "perfectly" safe. "We were surprised by the magnitude of life savings by the introduction of HAVs," said Nidhi Kalra. She is senior information scientist and director of RAND's San Francisco office. The RAND report, released online Tuesday, warns of the cost of forgoing somewhat safer self-driving cars in favor of waiting for hugely safer cars that might take many more years to develop. The safety record would improve even more by getting ... Read more

Related support groups: Head Injury, Prevention of Fractures

Health Tip: Sled Safer

Posted 1 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Most children who grow up in a snowy climate will spend many hours sledding. But the fun of sledding doesn't come without potential hazards. The American Academy of Pediatrics suggests how to keep your children safe while they're sledding: Stay away from motor vehicles. Supervise children at all times while they're sledding. Sledding alone isn't recommended for children under age 5. Separate younger children from older ones. Sled feet first to help prevent head injuries. Inspect sleds to make sure they are sound and don't have any sharp edges. Sled slopes should be free of obstructions, such as trees or fences. They also should be covered in snow, not ice, and not be too steep. Avoid sledding in crowded areas. Read more

Related support groups: Head Injury, Prevention of Fractures

Helmets Too Rarely Used in Baseball and Softball

Posted 31 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 31, 2017 – Despite a significant risk of head injuries in baseball and softball, helmet use in those sports is low, a new review says. "Our review demonstrates that traumatic brain injury in baseball and softball affects players of all levels and all positions," said study lead author Dr. Michael Cusimano, a neurosurgeon at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto. "Although the risk for traumatic brain injury is lower in baseball than other, high-contact sports like hockey and football, because the injuries can lead to very serious injuries like skull fractures and bleeding in the brain caused by balls or bats, it should be considered equally as serious and addressed in a way that reflects that," he said in a hospital news release. Cusimano and his colleagues reviewed 29 studies that included nearly 243,000 traumatic brain injuries sustained by baseball and softball players ... Read more

Related support groups: Head Injury, Head Injury with Intracranial Hemorrhage, Head Injury w/ Intracranial Hemorrhage and Loss of Consciousness, Head Injury with Loss of Consciousness

Hockey Study Suggests Injured Kids Sent Back on the Ice Too Soon

Posted 25 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 25, 2017 – After-effects of a concussion continue to wrack the brains of young hockey players long after they appear ready to return to play, new research finds. MRI scans of concussed teen hockey players revealed brain changes persist for at least three months – weeks after other symptoms resolve and skaters are cleared to hit the ice, a Canadian research team found. Scores on thinking and memory tests – two current measures of recovery – returned to normal about 24 days (on average) following a concussion, the study findings showed. These results indicate that current clinical tests used to judge an athlete's recovery could be improved, said senior researcher Ravi Menon. He's a professor and chair of functional and molecular imaging with the University of Western Ontario's Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry. "Clearly those tests are not very sensitive," ... Read more

Related support groups: Head Injury, Diagnosis and Investigation, Head Injury with Intracranial Hemorrhage, Head Injury w/ Intracranial Hemorrhage and Loss of Consciousness, Head Imaging, Head Injury with Loss of Consciousness

Health Tip: Drive Safely in Fog

Posted 25 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Navigating in a car or truck during foggy weather can be difficult and downright dangerous. If you must drive during fog, the National Weather Service offers these safety suggestions: Drive slowly and allow for extra time to reach your destination. Use your car's low-beam lights to make your vehicle more visible. Use fog lights if you have them. Never use your car's high beams during fog. They cause glare, making it more difficult to see what's ahead. Leave extra distance between you and the vehicle in front of you. Follow road lines with your eyes. When visibility is very low, pull over to a safe spot, and put on the hazard lights until the fog lifts. Read more

Related support groups: Head Injury, Prevention of Fractures

State Laws Help Reduce Concussions in Youth Sports

Posted 25 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 19, 2017 – State laws aimed at curbing an alarming rise in concussions among student athletes appear to be working. Since 2014, all 50 states and the District of Columbia have passed laws to protect young athletes against traumatic brain injury (TBI). Washington state was the first in 2009. Most of the laws require athletes with suspected concussions to stop playing until a doctor clears them to return. Coaches, players and parents must also receive yearly education about concussion. "This movement to get these laws passed has made a huge difference," said Kenneth Podell, director of the Houston Methodist Concussion Center, who reviewed a new study assessing the laws. Led by Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, researchers examined concussion reports to a nationwide sports injury tracking program before and after the laws were passed. The data covered nine ... Read more

Related support groups: Head Injury, Head Injury with Intracranial Hemorrhage, Head Injury w/ Intracranial Hemorrhage and Loss of Consciousness, Head Injury with Loss of Consciousness

Who's Most at Risk of Head Injury in Youth Football?

Posted 17 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 17, 2017 – Young football players are more likely to experience a brain-jarring hit to the head if they're part of a team's running and passing game or a fast-moving defender, a small study found. High-magnitude head impacts most often involve positions such as quarterback, running back and linebacker as those players sprint across an open field, Virginia Tech researchers concluded after watching a season of youth football in Blacksburg, Va. These players experienced nearly twice the number of severe head hits as linemen did, the study reported. "Players who are able to get up to speed prior to impact, players who are off the line of scrimmage, those players are more likely to experience a high-magnitude head impact," said lead researcher Eamon Campolettano. He is a graduate research assistant at the university's department of biomedical engineering and mechanics. ... Read more

Related support groups: Head Injury, Head Injury with Intracranial Hemorrhage, Head Injury w/ Intracranial Hemorrhage and Loss of Consciousness, Head Injury with Loss of Consciousness

Girls' Sports-Related Concussions May Last Twice As Long

Posted 2 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 2, 2017 – Sports concussion symptoms linger twice as long in teen girls as in boys, a new study finds. "These findings confirm what many in sports medicine have believed for some time," said lead researcher Dr. John Neidecker, a sports concussion specialist in Raleigh, N.C. Previous research has suggested that concussions may exacerbate underlying conditions that are more prevalent in girls – migraine headaches, depression, anxiety and stress. This may explain the extended recovery period, Neidecker and his colleagues said. The study findings were published Oct. 2 in the Journal of the American Osteopathic Association. The results highlight "the need to take a whole person approach to managing concussions, looking beyond the injury to understand the mental and emotional impacts on recovery when symptoms persist," Neidecker said. Doctors should get a full patient history ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Migraine, Major Depressive Disorder, Head Injury, Dysthymia, Head Injury w/ Intracranial Hemorrhage and Loss of Consciousness, Head Injury with Loss of Consciousness

Health Tip: Help Prevent Sports Injuries

Posted 29 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

-- There's no surefire way to prevent sports injuries. But there are things you can do to reduce the risk, the American Academy of Pediatrics says. Many sports-related injuries are related to overuse of certain joints and muscles, the academy says. It offers this advice: Allow at least one day a week of rest to allow the body to recover. Wear the appropriate protective gear for each sport. Always stretch before and after sports to help increase flexibility. Do not play while you are in pain. Drink fluids (preferably water) before, during and after exercise. Read more

Related support groups: Head Injury, Prevention of Fractures

20 Percent of U.S. Teens May Have Had a Concussion

Posted 26 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 26, 2017 – As many as one in five U.S. teens may have suffered a concussion, and contact sports might often be the cause. That's the conclusion of new research that included more than 13,000 teens. It also found that nearly 6 percent of teens reported having more than one concussion. These findings show that the number of middle school and high school students who will suffer a concussion in their lifetime is greater than thought, said lead researcher Phil Veliz. "The prevalence of concussions may be much higher than what is reported from emergency room data," said Veliz, a research assistant professor at the University of Michigan. "Participation in contact sports shows a strong association with reporting a diagnosed concussion," he added. These findings suggest a greater need for prevention efforts in schools and communities, "particularly with respect to ... Read more

Related support groups: Head Injury, Diagnosis and Investigation, Head Injury with Intracranial Hemorrhage, Head Injury w/ Intracranial Hemorrhage and Loss of Consciousness, Head Injury with Loss of Consciousness

Page 1 2 3 ... Next

Ask a Question

Further Information

Related Condition Support Groups

Head Injury with Loss of Consciousness, Head Injury with Intracranial Hemorrhage, Head Injury w/ Intracranial Hemorrhage and Loss of Consciousness, Central Nervous System Disorders

Related Drug Support Groups

risperidone, amantadine, Pentothal, thiopental