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Fastballs a Fast Track to 'Tommy John Surgery'?

Posted 26 May 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 26, 2016 – A new study finds that throwing a lot of fastballs may increase a pitcher's risk of an elbow injury requiring "Tommy John surgery." "Our findings suggest that throwing a high percentage of fastballs rather than off-speed pitches puts more stress on the elbow," said study author Dr. Robert Keller. "This leads to elbow fatigue, overuse and, subsequently, injury," Keller, chief resident in the department of orthopedic surgery at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, said in a hospital news release. Tommy John surgery is named after the big league pitcher who was the first to undergo the operation more than 40 years ago. Its medical name is ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) reconstruction. The procedure involves replacing the UCL in the medial elbow with a tendon from the same arm or the hamstring area. The researchers found that 83 Major League Baseball pitchers who ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery, Surgical Prophylaxis, Epicondylitis - Tennis Elbow

'Tennis Elbow' Usually Heals Without Therapy, Study Finds

Posted 1 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 1, 2015 – Most people with tennis elbow recover without physical therapy and steroid injections, according to a study by researchers in Norway. "I'm not surprised because that's really been the classic teaching," said Dr. Joshua Dines, an orthopedic surgeon at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City. "The number that's often cited is that 90 percent of tennis elbow, golfer's elbow, will get better by the end of the year no matter what you do." Study first author Dr. Morten Olaussen, a specialist in family medicine at the University of Oslo, agreed that the finding was expected. But, he added, "it is interesting to note that after one year, as much as one-third of the patients still reported considerable discomfort." What was surprising, said Olaussen, was that physical therapy was not effective. "It has been shown to be effective in earlier research but then on ... Read more

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More Teen Athletes Undergoing Tommy John Elbow Surgery: Study

Posted 14 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 14, 2015 – Most Tommy John surgeries to fix elbows torn in sports-related injuries are being performed on teenagers, especially baseball pitchers, and the numbers are rising every year, a new study reports. Tommy John surgery fixes a torn ulnar collateral ligament, or UCL. The UCL is located on the inside of the elbow and connects the bone of the upper arm to a bone in the forearm. Teens between ages 15 and 19 accounted for nearly 60 percent of all Tommy John surgeries performed in the United States between 2007 and 2011, the study said. Kids these days are playing sports year-round, and often specializing in a single sport to improve their chances of getting a scholarship or making the big leagues, said lead author Dr. Brandon Erickson, an orthopedic surgery resident at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. "The more pitches kids throw and the faster they throw ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Orthopedic Surgery, Epicondylitis - Tennis Elbow

Second 'Tommy John' Surgery Is No Win for Pitchers

Posted 24 Mar 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 24, 2015 – Having a second elbow ligament reconstruction surgery appears to lower professional baseball pitchers' performance and shorten their careers, a new study finds. Researchers looked at 33 major league pitchers who had surgery twice to reconstruct a torn ulnar collateral ligament in their throwing arm – a procedure widely referred to as "Tommy John" surgery because he's the first pitcher who had the surgery. After the second UCL reconstruction, 65 percent of the pitchers returned to pitching at a major league level. They averaged three years or less at the major league level after the second procedure. The number of innings they pitched decreased by nearly half, according to the study. The number of pitches resulting in walks rose from 4.02 to 4.79 for every nine innings, and their wins and losses dropped in half following the second surgery. The Henry Ford ... Read more

Related support groups: Orthopedic Surgery, Epicondylitis - Tennis Elbow

Steroid Shots for Tennis Elbow Miss the Mark: Study

Posted 5 Feb 2013 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 5 – A corticosteroid shot is a common treatment for "tennis elbow," but a new study finds it might do more harm than good. For people with tennis elbow – a painful condition related to overuse of the tendon in the elbow – more bad news emerged from the study: Combining physical therapy with a steroid shot was of no benefit over the long-term either. "Patients having steroid injections should be warned of the potential for recurrence three to 12 months after the injection, even after feeling any benefit in the short term," said senior study author Bill Vicenzino, chairman of sports physiotherapy at the University of Queensland in St. Lucia, Australia. Recurrences are usually put down to the fact that patients feel better after the injection and then do too much too soon, Vicenzino said. To avoid this, physical therapy may be recommended post-injection to moderate the ... Read more

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Steroids May Only Offer Short-Term Help for Tennis Elbow

Posted 22 Oct 2010 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 21 – Although a steroid shot can relieve the pain of tennis elbow in the short run, long-term use is less effective and might even be harmful, Australian researchers say. "There is a high risk of poor long-term outcomes and higher recurrence rates with corticosteroid injections," said lead author Bill Vicenzino, chair of sports physiotherapy in the School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences at the University of Queensland. "Other treatments, including exercise, some specific physiotherapy and possibly some other injections, should be used before corticosteroid injections," Vicenzino said. The report is published in the Oct. 21 online edition of The Lancet. For the study, Vicenzino and colleagues reviewed the benefits and risks of steroid injections for treating tendinopathy in the short term, intermediate term, and long term, and in different body areas. Their analysis ... Read more

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Scientists Discover Substance That Causes Pain

Posted 28 Apr 2010 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 28 – The human body produces a substance similar to capsaicin – which makes chili peppers hot – at sites of pain, and blocking production of this substance can ease pain, a new study shows. The findings may lead to the development of non-addictive painkillers, according to the researchers at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio. In work with mice, the scientists found that a family of fatty acids called oxidized linoleic acid metabolites (OLAMs) play an important role in the biology of pain. "This is a major breakthrough in understanding the mechanisms of pain and how to more effectively treat it," senior investigator Kenneth Hargreaves, chair of the Department of Endodontics in the Dental School at the UT Health Sciences Center, said in an UT news release. "These data demonstrate, for the first time, that OLAMs constitute a new family of ... Read more

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Botox Injections May Relieve Tennis Elbow Pain

Posted 26 Apr 2010 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 26 – Botulinum toxin, which smoothes facial wrinkles through injections of the drug Botox, can also help people who suffer from "tennis elbow," a new study finds. But the researchers warn that it must be injected carefully, and there's a potentially nettlesome side effect, according to the report published online April 26 in the Canadian Medical Association Journal. Researchers at the Imam Khomeini Hospital Complex at Tehran University in Iran gave botulinum toxin injections to 48 patients with tennis elbow who hadn't been helped by previous treatments. Tennis elbow, which causes pain and inflammation in the upper arm near the elbow, affects some people who repeatedly move their wrists or forearms while taking part in activities like tennis. The researchers customized the injection sites based on the length of each patient's forearm instead of giving injections at the ... Read more

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