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Related terms: Chronic Depression, Depression, Chronic, Dysthymic Disorder

Could New 'Talk Therapy' Cut Cost of Treating Depression?

Posted 1 day 18 hours ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 22, 2016 – A simpler and less expensive form of talk therapy is as effective as the gold-standard treatment – cognitive behavioral therapy – for treating depression in adults, a new study suggests. The researchers found that so-called behavioral activation therapy treats depression just as well as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). But behavioral activation can be provided by mental health workers with minimal training and is significantly cheaper, the study authors contended. Cognitive behavioral therapy is provided by highly trained and highly paid specialists. In many countries, CBT is available only to patients who can afford it or who have health insurance, and waiting lists can be long. For example, in the United States, only about one-fourth of people with depression have received any form of psychological therapy in the last 12 months, the researchers said. The ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Lexapro, Zoloft, Cymbalta, Effexor, Prozac, Celexa, Citalopram, Paxil, Major Depressive Disorder, Sertraline, Pristiq, Effexor XR, Amitriptyline, Fluoxetine, Venlafaxine, Mirtazapine, Savella, Elavil, Remeron

Depression Strikes Nearly 3 Million U.S. Teens a Year

Posted 16 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 7, 2016 – In just one year, almost 3 million U.S. teens suffered a major bout of depression, a new government report shows. "Adolescence is a critical time in a person's development, and battling with depression can be devastating for teens unless they receive effective treatment," said Paolo del Vecchio, director of the Center for Mental Health Services at the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). "Effective treatment is available, but parents, teachers and all concerned members of the community must work to assure that adolescents in need get help," del Vecchio said in an agency news release. These young people feel depressed and lose interest in their activities for at least two weeks. They may also have trouble sleeping, eating or concentrating, the agency explained. The overall rate of depression among young people jumped to 11 ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Lexapro, Zoloft, Wellbutrin, Cymbalta, Effexor, Prozac, Celexa, Citalopram, Paxil, Major Depressive Disorder, Sertraline, Pristiq, Effexor XR, Amitriptyline, Bupropion, Viibryd, Fluoxetine, Venlafaxine, Wellbutrin XL

Jobs With the Highest Suicide Rates

Posted 1 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 30, 2016 – Can the type of job you choose affect your risk of suicide? Possibly, according to a new U.S. report that found for certain occupations, the odds of suicide were significantly higher. From 2000 to 2012, the overall rates of suicide for people aged 16 and older rose 21 percent, the study found. That works out to an approximate increase from 13 to 16 suicides per every 100,000 people in the United States. But among farmers, fishers and foresters, the suicide rate was dramatically higher – at 85 suicides per 100,000 people. For males in those jobs, the rate was even greater. Their suicide rate was 90.5 suicides per 100,000, according to the report. "People working in certain occupations are at greater risk for suicide due to job isolation, a stressful work environment, trouble at work and home, lower income and education, and less access to mental health ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Major Depressive Disorder, Dysthymia

Religion a Buffer Against Suicide for Women, Study Suggests

Posted 29 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 29, 2016 – Women who regularly attend religious services may have a lower risk of suicide than those who don't, a new study suggests. U.S. researchers reviewed data on nearly 90,000 women. They were enrolled in the Nurses' Health Study from 1996 to 2010. During that time, there were 36 suicides. About 19 percent of women in the study attended religious services more than once a week. Around 41 percent attended once a week. Approximately 16 percent attended services less than once a week, and about 24 percent never attended religious services, the study found. Women who attended religious services at least once a week had a five times lower risk of suicide than those who never attended services, the study showed. However, the study could only show an association and not a cause-and-effect relationship. The study authors also noted that most of the women in the study were ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Major Depressive Disorder, Dysthymia, Neurotic Depression, Depressive Psychosis

Hovering Parents May Harm Kids

Posted 27 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, June 25, 2016 – Children with "intrusive" parents who push too hard for good grades may be more prone to become highly self-critical or anxious and depressed, a new study suggests. "When parents become intrusive in their children's lives, it may signal to the children that what they do is never good enough," said study leader Ryan Hong, an assistant professor in the department of psychology at the National University of Singapore. The five-year study of primary school students in Singapore found that those whose parents acted intrusively, had high expectations of academic performance or overreacted when the child made a mistake were at increased risk of being overly critical of themselves. The researchers also found that children who were highly self-critical had higher levels of anxiety or depression symptoms, although the study did not prove that parental pressure caused ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Dysthymia, Seasonal Affective Disorder

Long Work Hours May Hurt Your Health

Posted 21 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 21, 2016 – Years of working long hours may help you climb the career ladder, but those hours may take a steep toll on your health – and that's especially true for women, new research says. "People who habitually put in a lot of long hours for many years, even decades, are really running an increased risk of potentially seeing chronic disease later in life," said study researcher Allard Dembe. He's a professor of health services management and policy at the College of Public Health at Ohio State University. The link between long work hours and disease ''seems to be present a bit in men but is tremendously more evident in women," said Dembe. While the study cannot prove cause and effect, he said, the associations were strong in women. When the researchers compared men who worked more than 60 hours a week to those who worked 30 to 40, they found those who worked the longer ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Hypertension, Major Depressive Disorder, Asthma, Heart Disease, Asthma - Maintenance, Dysthymia, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Job Hunting? Maybe a Therapist Can Help

Posted 20 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 20, 2016 – The unemployed may find help for their job search in an unexpected place – a therapist's office. A type of counseling called cognitive behavioral therapy teaches skills that might help people who are unemployed get a job, a new study suggests. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can be used to help people with depression. This type of therapy teaches people to identify negative thoughts and replace them with positive ones. "Searching for a job is difficult in any circumstance, but it may be even more difficult for people who are depressed," said study co-author Daniel Strunk, an associate professor of psychology at Ohio State University. "But we found that there are specific skills that can help not only manage the symptoms of depression but also make it more likely that a person will receive a job offer," Strunk said in a university news release. The study ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Major Depressive Disorder, Postpartum Depression, Dysthymia, Seasonal Affective Disorder, Neurotic Depression, Depressive Psychosis

Depression Plagues Many With COPD

Posted 17 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 17, 2016 – Struggling with chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD) may raise the risk of depression among patients with the incurable respiratory illness, two new studies suggest. One report, from scientists at Manchester Metropolitan University in England, found one in four patients with COPD suffered persistent depressive symptoms over the three years of the study. If untreated, depression can have a negative effect on the patients' overall health and the effectiveness of their treatment, the researchers noted. A second study from the University of Texas analyzed data from a random sample of 5 percent of Medicare beneficiaries diagnosed with COPD between 2001 and 2011. The researchers found that 22 percent of those patients had one or more psychological disorders. The study also showed that the odds of 30-day readmission to the hospital were higher in patients with ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Major Depressive Disorder, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Maintenance, Fluticasone, Dysthymia, Ribavirin, Qvar, Flovent, Budesonide, Entocort, Tobramycin, Seasonal Affective Disorder, Mometasone, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Acute, Entocort EC, Acetylcysteine, Beclomethasone, Mucomyst, Pulmicort Flexhaler

1 in 13 Young Adults in U.S. Considered Suicide in Past Year

Posted 16 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 16, 2016 – About one in 13 young adults in the United States had serious thoughts of suicide in 2013-2014, federal officials reported Thursday. That rate of 7.4 percent translates into 2.6 million Americans between the ages of 18 and 25, researchers said. "Suicide is one of the leading causes of death among young adults, and it is preventable," said Kana Enomoto. She's principal deputy administrator at the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), which released the report. "We need to reach out to young people with the message that help is at hand, and promote effective programs for saving lives by treating people at risk whenever and wherever they need it," Enomoto added in an agency news release. One expert said help is out there for the troubled, but more must be done. "Breaking down barriers regarding mental health, improving access to ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Lexapro, Zoloft, Cymbalta, Effexor, Prozac, Celexa, Citalopram, Paxil, Major Depressive Disorder, Sertraline, Pristiq, Effexor XR, Amitriptyline, Fluoxetine, Venlafaxine, Mirtazapine, Savella, Elavil, Remeron

The Childhood Incidents That Increase Later Suicide Risk

Posted 13 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 13, 2016 – Adults who witnessed parental domestic violence in childhood are at increased risk for suicide attempts, a new study finds. "When domestic violence is chronic in a home, there is a risk of long-term negative outcomes for the children, even when the children themselves are not abused," said study lead author Esme Fuller-Thomson. She is a professor with the University of Toronto's Faculty of Social Work. The researchers examined data from more than 22,500 Canadian adults. They found that about 17 percent of those exposed to chronic parental domestic violence (more than 10 times before age 16) had attempted suicide, compared with roughly 2 percent of those not exposed to parental domestic violence. "We had expected that the association between chronic parental domestic violence and later suicide attempts would be explained by childhood sexual or physical abuse, or ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Opiate Dependence, Major Depressive Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Drug Dependence, Dysthymia, Substance Abuse, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse

Strategies That Work to Help Prevent Suicides

Posted 13 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 10, 2016 – How can you keep someone who's thinking about suicide from going through with it? One way is to restrict easy access to methods of suicide, a new international review suggests. Researchers found that the number of suicides decreased in countries that reduced the number of pills sold at one time for drugs that could potentially be used in suicide attempts. Another effective measure is the installation of physical barriers at known suicide locations, such as high bridges, the investigators found. The researchers said these measures are helpful because they might thwart impulsive suicide attempts. There is no single best way to prevent suicide, according to one of the study authors, Joseph Zohar, a professor of psychiatry at Tel Aviv University in Israel. "However, implementation of the evidence-supported methods described in this study, including public and ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Major Depressive Disorder, Dysthymia, Depressive Psychosis

Are 'Workaholics' Prone to OCD, Anxiety?

Posted 10 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 10, 2016 – Some workaholics may be prone to mental health disorders, compared to folks with greater work-life balance, new research suggests. These disorders may include anxiety, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and depression, the study authors said. The findings, based on a review of more than 15,000 Norwegians, suggest that "taking work to the extreme may be a sign of deeper psychiatric issues," said study lead author Cecilie Schou Andreassen. "Physicians should not take for granted that a seemingly successful workaholic doesn't have these disorders," said Schou Andreassen, a clinical psychologist with the University of Bergen, in Norway. The research doesn't delve into cause and effect, so it's not clear how mental health issues and overwork might be linked. Nor should hard workers be labeled as workaholics, although ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Panic Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Major Depressive Disorder, Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Dysthymia, Performance Anxiety

Study Questions Use of Antidepressants for Children, Teens

Posted 9 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 8, 2016 – Treating children and teens suffering from depression with antidepressants may be both ineffective and potentially dangerous, a new analysis suggests. Of the 14 antidepressants studied, only fluoxetine (Prozac) was more effective in treating depression than an inactive placebo in children and teens, the review found. And Effexor (venlafaxine) was linked to a higher risk of suicidal thoughts and attempts compared to a placebo and five other antidepressants, the researchers reported. "In the clinical care of young people with major depressive disorder, clinical guidelines recommend psychotherapy – especially cognitive behavioral therapy or interpersonal therapy – as the first-line treatment," said study author Dr. Andrea Cipriani. He is an associate professor in the department of psychiatry at the University of Oxford, in England. Major depression affects ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Lexapro, Zoloft, Effexor, Prozac, Celexa, Citalopram, Paxil, Major Depressive Disorder, Sertraline, Effexor XR, Amitriptyline, Fluoxetine, Venlafaxine, Elavil, Escitalopram, Nortriptyline, Paroxetine, Luvox, Doxepin

Among U.S. Military, Army Members Face Highest Suicide Risk

Posted 6 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 6, 2016 – Suicide rates have been increasing among all active U.S. Navy, Air Force and Army personnel, but those in the Army appear to be most at risk, new research indicates. An analysis of all U.S. military suicides between 2005 and 2011 revealed that the suicide rate among Army members was roughly double that seen among the second highest risk group, the Marines. The investigation further revealed that guns are the principal cause of most military suicides. Firearms were implicated in more than 62 percent of all suicide cases that have a definitive cause of death, the study found. "The trends in suicide are similar to what others have found," said study lead author Andrew Anglemyer, from California State University, Monterey Bay. "The differences in those rates between services are striking, though. Not only are most suicides in the active duty military among the Army ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Major Depressive Disorder, Dysthymia, Seasonal Affective Disorder, Neurotic Depression, Depressive Psychosis

Health Tip: Get Enough Sleep

Posted 4 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Not getting enough sleep can worsen depression, experts say. What can you do to improve both? The National Sleep Foundation suggests: Don't ignore symptoms of depression. See a doctor for treatment, which may mean medication, psychological therapy or both. Go to bed at the same time each night, and wake up at the same time each morning. Exercise daily, and practice relaxation techniques such as meditation or deep breathing. Don't use nicotine, alcohol or caffeine, especially in the evening. Don't watch TV or use a computer in the bedroom. Use a white noise machine or earplugs to block out noise. Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Major Depressive Disorder, Fatigue, Postpartum Depression, Dysthymia, Seasonal Affective Disorder, Depressive Psychosis

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Related Condition Support Groups

Neurotic Depression, Depression

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citalopram, sertraline, amitriptyline, bupropion, fluoxetine, Elavil, paroxetine, duloxetine, fluvoxamine, Endep, Vanatrip