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Related terms: Chronic Depression, Depression, Chronic, Dysthymic Disorder

Can Suicide Tries Spread Among Soldiers?

Posted 20 hours ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 26, 2017 – Troubling new study findings suggest that U.S. Army soldiers are more likely to try to kill themselves if another member of their unit has attempted suicide in the previous year. In fact, the researchers linked almost 20 percent of such suicide attempts to recent attempts by others in their units. It's not clear if the findings reflect a contagion-like effect, high levels of stress inside specific units or something else altogether, the investigators noted. Whatever the case, "when a suicide attempt occurs in a unit, there is increased risk of another suicide attempt," said study author Dr. Robert Ursano. He is a professor of psychiatry and neuroscience at the Uniformed Services University, in Bethesda, Md. "Being alert to clusters of suicide attempts may offer new avenues for intervention to decrease suicide attempt rates." Suicides among active members of ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Dysthymia, Neurotic Depression

Nearly 1 in 5 U.S. Adults Has Mental Illness or Drug Problem

Posted 6 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 21, 2017 – Nearly 1 in 5 American adults deals with a mental illness or substance abuse problem each year, a U.S. government study says. Oregon has the highest rate, and New Jersey the lowest, according to 2012-2014 data analyzed by the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). Overall, almost 44 million Americans 18 or older had a diagnosable mental, behavioral or emotional disorder in the past year, researchers said. They reviewed national surveys on drug use and health. "The figures in SAMHSA's report remind us how important it is to take mental health as seriously as any other health condition," Kana Enomoto, SAMHSA acting deputy assistant secretary, said in an agency news release. The overall national rate of mental illness was about 18 percent. In Oregon, almost 23 percent of the state residents had any type of mental illness. Utah, ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Bipolar Disorder, Oxycodone, Anxiety and Stress, Hydrocodone, Tramadol, Percocet, Methadone, OxyContin, Vicodin, Major Depressive Disorder, Norco, Fentanyl, Opiate Dependence, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Morphine, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Codeine

Estrogen May Influence Women's Depression Risk

Posted 6 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 21, 2017 – Women exposed to estrogen for longer periods of time during the reproductive years may have a lower risk of depression, a new study finds. Previous research has suggested that reproductive hormones play a role in depression risk among women, yet hormone fluctuations are something all women experience. So, the study authors tried to figure out how hormones might be linked to depression. The researchers focused on estradiol. This is the main form of estrogen present during a woman's reproductive years. Estradiol affects levels of serotonin, a brain chemical that's involved in depression. Factors that might increase the length of exposure to estradiol include a younger age at first menstruation and how many menstrual cycles a woman has over her lifetime, the researchers said. This study of more than 1,300 women found that being exposed to estradiol for a longer ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Depression, Contraception, Major Depressive Disorder, Hot Flashes, Menopausal Disorders, Menstrual Disorders, Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder, Period Pain, Premenstrual Syndrome, Postmenopausal Symptoms, Dysthymia, Perimenopausal Symptoms, Dysmenorrhea, Neurotic Depression, Vaginal Dryness, Premenopausal Anovulation, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Antidepressants in Pregnancy Tied to Slight Increase in Autism

Posted 7 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 20, 2017 – In the long-standing debate over whether antidepressants are safe to take during pregnancy, a new study suggests that exposure to the drugs in the womb might bump up a child's risk of autism. The risk of autism was 45 percent higher for kids whose moms took antidepressants compared to kids born to mothers with psychiatric disorders who weren't prescribed antidepressants, the study found. "We found consistent results pointing towards a small effect of antidepressants with autism, especially higher functioning forms of autism without intellectual disability," said lead researcher Dheeraj Rai. He is a senior lecturer in psychiatry with the University of Bristol in the United Kingdom. "We think it is important to keep in mind the absolute risk, which is small," Rai said. "Over 95 percent of women in the study who took antidepressants during pregnancy did not have ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Lexapro, Zoloft, Cymbalta, Effexor, Prozac, Major Depressive Disorder, Celexa, Citalopram, Paxil, Sertraline, Pristiq, Amitriptyline, Venlafaxine, Fluoxetine, Effexor XR, Mirtazapine, Escitalopram, Savella, Remeron

Targeting 9 Risk Factors Could Prevent 1 in 3 Dementia Cases: Study

Posted 7 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 20, 2017 – One-third of dementia cases worldwide might be prevented by paying attention to nine risk factors throughout life, researchers say. These measures include: staying in school until you're at least over the age of 15; reducing hearing loss, obesity and high blood pressure in mid-life (ages 45 to 65); and reducing smoking, depression, physical inactivity, social isolation and diabetes in later life (65 and older). Taking care of these risk factors would possibly prevent 35 percent of dementia cases, the study findings suggested. In comparison, targeting the major genetic risk factor – known as ApoE – would prevent less than one in 10 dementia cases (7 percent), the study authors said. The three risk factors that could potentially make the most difference in preventing dementia include: staying in school (which would reduce dementia cases by 8 percent); reducing ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Obesity, Major Depressive Disorder, Hypertension, Smoking, Dementia, Smoking Cessation, Alzheimer's Disease, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Dysthymia, Diabetes Mellitus, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Hearing Loss, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Dementia with Depressive Features, Lewy Body Dementia

Med Switch Not Always Best Choice With Tough Depression

Posted 16 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 11, 2017 – Switching to another antidepressant may not be the best way to help depression patients who don't respond to the first antidepressant they take, a new study indicates. Among more than 1,500 depression patients at 35 U.S. Veterans Health Administration medical centers, better symptom relief was achieved when people were prescribed an antipsychotic medication or a second antidepressant rather than being switched to another antidepressant, the researchers found. "We found that among three strategies evaluated in this study, evidence of the greatest symptom benefit was provided by adding an antipsychotic to previous antidepressant therapy," said study author Dr. Somaia Mohamed. She is an associate clinical professor of psychiatry at Yale University School of Medicine. The researchers found that 29 percent of patients who took the antipsychotic drug aripiprazole ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Lexapro, Zoloft, Cymbalta, Effexor, Prozac, Major Depressive Disorder, Celexa, Citalopram, Paxil, Sertraline, Pristiq, Amitriptyline, Venlafaxine, Fluoxetine, Effexor XR, Escitalopram, Savella, Nortriptyline, Elavil

Getting Over Guilt

Posted 6 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 6, 2017 – Do you sometimes feel weighed down by guilt? Guilt over unethical behavior is so powerful that it can make you feel as though you've gained weight – even when your actual weight stays the same, according to a study by U.S. and Canadian researchers. Guilt is an important emotion. Appropriate guilt helps you recognize when you've made a mistake, and stops you from making the same mistake again. But sometimes we feel guilty even though we've done nothing wrong, and there is no misstep to think about or fix. If you're feeling guilty, figure out whether it's healthy and appropriate. If it is, the next step is to take action. The sooner you apologize or correct what you did wrong, the faster the guilt will go away. Once you've done this, it's important to recognize that you can't change the past – you need to let it go. As you move forward, try to learn from the ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Dysthymia, Psychiatric Disorders, Performance Anxiety

Take A New View of Yoga

Posted 5 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 5, 2017 – Want to add strength training, flexibility, and even stress reduction to your fitness plan? Then it's time to consider – or reconsider, if you've shied away from it in the past – the ancient Indian practice of yoga. Some 11 million Americans take part in one form of yoga or another. And, far from being a new-age type of exercise, it's embraced by people from all walks of life – men as well as women, and even pro athletes, according to the American Council on Exercise. And you don't have to twist yourself into a pretzel to do it. The most popular discipline is Hatha yoga, which stresses concentration and uses stretching and strengthening exercises. Many poses or asanas aren't complicated, but they are effective. You can choose those specifically targeted to your needs. For example, the Warrior 2 pose improves hip flexibility and strengthens the quadriceps. ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Depression, Back Pain, Major Depressive Disorder, Chronic Pain, Muscle Pain, Sciatica, Dysthymia

For Many, Friends Are Key to Happiness in Old Age

Posted 29 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 29, 2017 – As you age, the friends you keep wield an ever-greater impact on your health and sense of happiness, new research reveals. They may even outstrip family in terms of the sway they have over you, according to the pair of new studies. Lead investigator William Chopik cited several reasons why friendships might pack a bigger punch than blood relationships when it comes to influencing health and well-being. "We spend leisure time with friends. We freely choose to continue relationships with friends," said Chopik, an assistant professor of psychology at Michigan State University. If the friendships last until older adulthood, "clearly these are good friendships," he added. "As we age, we prune away at some of the friendships that are more superficial and acquaintance-like," he said. That means that as older adults, "we're left with the ones that are deeper and make ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Cancer, Major Depressive Disorder, Cough, Osteoarthritis, Hypertension, Ischemic Stroke, High Cholesterol, Bronchitis, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Maintenance, Transient Ischemic Attack, Pre-Diabetes, Dysthymia, Diabetes Mellitus, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Acute, Bronchiectasis, Thromboembolic Stroke Prophylaxis

More Americans Are Walking for Exercise

Posted 29 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 29, 2017 – Call it a step in the right direction: More and more Americans are trying to walk their way to better health. The number of adults who took up walking for exercise or as a way to get from place to place increased significantly between 2005 and 2015, federal health officials reported Thursday. During that time, the percentage of women who walk increased from 57 percent to 65 percent. Among men, the percentage increased from 54 percent to 63 percent, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "People who are physically active have a lower risk of many chronic diseases – like heart disease, stroke and depression – and it supports the healthy aging process for older adults," said study lead author Emily Ussery, a CDC epidemiologist. On the downside, although more people are walking, the increase among men has stalled a bit in recent years, ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Major Depressive Disorder, Heart Disease, Dysthymia, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Thromboembolic Stroke Prophylaxis, Ischemic Heart Disease

Concussion in High School Doesn't Boost Depression Risk: Study

Posted 29 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 29, 2017 – Two new studies offer good news for any high school athlete who's suffered a concussion: For most athletes, mental or physical effects may resolve themselves over the long term. One study involving more than 260 high school athletes who'd suffered a concussion found they had no bigger risk for depression within about two years after the injury, compared to peers who hadn't had such an injury. And a second study, involving more than 1,200 high school athletes, found no differences in self-reported quality of life over two years of follow-up, regardless of whether or not they'd had a concussion. "It is interesting that high school athletes with previous concussion history do not report a decrease in quality of life," said study author Jerod Keene. "When you consider that, overall, high school athletes have been shown to score higher on quality of life than their ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Major Depressive Disorder, Head Injury, Dysthymia, Head Injury with Intracranial Hemorrhage, Head Injury w/ Intracranial Hemorrhage and Loss of Consciousness, Head Injury with Loss of Consciousness

Depression May Worsen Health for Cancer Caregivers

Posted 29 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 29, 2017 – Depression is known to be linked to worsening physical health, and a new study finds this may be especially true for cancer caregivers. The researchers recommended assessing caregivers' mental health soon after their loved one's cancer diagnosis. "Identifying caregivers in need, and connecting these caregivers to effective and accessible psychosocial services, are imperative next steps to improve comprehensive care for families facing cancer," study leader Kelly Shaffer said in a news release from the American Cancer Society. Shaffer is with Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. She and her team analyzed responses from 664 caregivers who answered American Cancer Society surveys. Specifically, the researchers looked for changes in participants' health from two years to eight years after their loved ones' cancer diagnosis. Two years after the ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Lexapro, Zoloft, Cymbalta, Cancer, Effexor, Prozac, Major Depressive Disorder, Celexa, Citalopram, Paxil, Sertraline, Pristiq, Amitriptyline, Venlafaxine, Fluoxetine, Effexor XR, Escitalopram, Savella, Nortriptyline

Electric Brain Stimulation No Better Than Meds For Depression: Study

Posted 28 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 28, 2017 – For people who battle depression and can't find relief, stimulating the brain with electric impulses may help. But a new study by Brazilian researchers says it's still no better than antidepressant medication. In a trial that pitted transcranial, direct-current stimulation (tDCS) against the antidepressant escitalopram (Lexapro), researchers found that lessening of depression was about the same for either treatment. "We found that antidepressants are better than tDCS and should be the treatment of choice," said lead researcher Dr. Andre Brunoni. He's director of the Service of Interdisciplinary Neuromodulation at the University of Sao Paulo. "In circumstances that antidepressant drugs cannot be used, tDCS can be considered, as it was more effective than placebo," he said. The researchers used the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. This test has a score range ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Lexapro, Major Depressive Disorder, Escitalopram, Postpartum Depression, Dysthymia, Seasonal Affective Disorder, Neurotic Depression, Depressive Psychosis, Diagnosis and Investigation

Poor Sleep May Worsen Suicidal Thoughts

Posted 28 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 28, 2017 – Sleep problems may provide early clues about worsening suicidal thoughts in at-risk young adults as well as a potential way to intervene, a new study suggests. "Suicide is the tragic outcome of psychiatric illness interacting with multiple biological, psychological and social risk factors," said lead author Rebecca Bernert. She is a suicidologist and assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences from Stanford University Medical School. "Sleep disturbances stand apart from other risk factors because they are visible as a warning sign, yet non-stigmatizing and highly treatable. This is why we believe they may represent an important treatment target in suicide prevention," she said in a university news release. How could sleep potentially prevent a suicide? "Sleep is a barometer of our well-being, and directly impacts how we feel the next day. We ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Bipolar Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Major Depressive Disorder, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Fatigue, Social Anxiety Disorder, Schizophrenia, Mania, Borderline Personality Disorder, Dysthymia, Psychiatric Disorders, Drowsiness, Hypersomnia, Severe Mood Dysregulation, Cyclothymic Disorder

Could Your Office Job Rob You of Vitamin D?

Posted 22 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 22, 2017 – Spending your days cooped up inside an office might mean you're not getting enough vital vitamin D – know as the "sunshine vitamin," researchers report. Canadian researchers found that vitamin D deficiency levels differ by occupation, with people who are closeted indoors faring worse than others. "We know that vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency is prevalent in the population at large. We can now say that occupation is a factor that is important in determining if someone may be vitamin D-deficient or not," said lead researcher Dr. Sebastian Straube. He's an associate professor of preventive medicine at the University of Alberta in Edmonton. Vitamin D is found naturally in a few foods, and often added to milk and other products. Skin exposure to sunlight also produces vitamin D, which is why it's called the sunshine vitamin. In the new research, Straube and ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Obesity, Major Depressive Disorder, Osteoporosis, Vitamin D Deficiency, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation and Deficiency, Fracture, bone, Dysthymia, Prevention of Osteoporosis, Caltrate 600 with D, Vitamin D Insufficiency, Citracal + D, Calcium/Vitamin D, Oysco 500 with D, Citracal Petites, Oyster Shell Calcium, Citracal Creamy Bites, Calcet, Calcium 600 D, Calcarb with D

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Related Condition Support Groups

Neurotic Depression, Depression

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citalopram, sertraline, bupropion, amitriptyline, fluoxetine, Elavil, paroxetine, duloxetine, fluvoxamine, Endep, Vanatrip