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Related terms: Chronic Depression, Depression, Chronic, Dysthymic Disorder

Autism's 'Worryingly' High Suicide Rates Spur Conference

Posted 11 hours ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 25, 2017 – High rates of suicide among people with autism are drawing specialists to a conference this week in England. "What relatively little we know about suicidality in autism points to a worryingly high prevalence of people with the condition contemplating and attempting to take their own life," said Sarah Cassidy, co-author of a paper written in advance of the meeting. "More concerning still, the small body of research that does exist exposes serious shortcomings in how prepared we are to intervene and provide effective support to those with autism who are most at risk of dying by suicide," said Cassidy. Cassidy is with Coventry University's Center for Research in Psychology, Behavior and Achievement. Researchers at Coventry and Newcastle universities organized the two-day meeting. Urgent action is needed to help those most at risk, but the issue is poorly ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Major Depressive Disorder, Autism, Dysthymia, Asperger Syndrome, Depressive Psychosis

Health Tip: Don't Take Stress to Bed

Posted 2 days 10 hours ago by Drugs.com

-- Stress can worsen sleep, and lack of sleep can worsen stress. These can lead to dental health issues, heart problems and depression, so keep stress at bay before bed. The National Sleep Foundation suggests: Use aromatherapy to help you relax. Rub on lavender-scented lotion or use lavender essential oil. Listen to soothing, relaxing classical music, or some nature sounds. If you can't slow your thoughts, write them down in a journal to get them out of your head. Practice yoga to clear and calm your mind. Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Major Depressive Disorder, Fatigue, Oral and Dental Conditions, Dysthymia

Suicide Risk Quadruples After Lung Cancer Diagnosis

Posted 2 days 10 hours ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 23, 2017 – People with lung cancer have a strikingly higher-than-normal risk of suicide, a new study finds. While a cancer diagnosis on its own significantly raises the risk of suicide, the study found that a lung cancer diagnosis raised the odds of suicide by over four times compared to people in the general population. "A cancer diagnosis is an overwhelming diagnosis for patients psychologically and emotionally," explained study senior author Dr. Jeffrey Port. "It is a very tough diagnosis for patients to manage, and there is a higher suicide rate," he added. Port is a professor of cardiothoracic surgery at Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York City. The study included data from over 3 million patients during a 40-year period. Cancer diagnoses were linked to over 6,600 suicides. Although the study wasn't designed to prove a direct cause-and-effect relationship, the ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Dysthymia

Heavy Kids Face Triple the Odds for Depression in Adulthood

Posted 7 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, May 19, 2017 – As if it isn't tough enough being an overweight kid, a new study shows it could have long-lasting repercussions for psychological health, too. When compared with normal-weight kids who become overweight adults, overweight or obese youth in the study faced three times the risk of depression in adulthood, the research found. And, that risk was more than four times greater if they were overweight or obese in both childhood and adulthood, the investigators reported. The study doesn't prove that obesity causes depression. But the finding confirms earlier reports of an increased depression risk in young people who are obese, the study authors said. "Overweight children do have a higher risk of developing major depressive disorder over their lifetime compared to normal-weight children," said study author Deborah Gibson-Smith. More than one in three children in the ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Obesity, Major Depressive Disorder, Weight Loss, Dysthymia

Yoga, Meditation May Ease Some Breast Cancer Symptoms

Posted 7 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, May 19, 2017 – The diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer can come with a lot of anxiety, depression and other symptoms that affect quality of life. But mind-body therapies, such as yoga or meditation, may help ease these troubling concerns, a new study suggests. The researchers reviewed previous studies done on 80 integrative therapies. "We have good evidence that [some] mind-body therapies – such as meditation, yoga, relaxation – can provide benefit to breast cancer patients during and after treatment," said study researcher Heather Greenlee. She's an assistant professor of epidemiology at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. "And we do have evidence that acupuncture is very useful in managing pain," she added. Evidence about dietary supplements and botanicals, however, are lacking when it comes to helping symptoms and side effects, she said. Greenlee ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Cancer, Major Depressive Disorder, Breast Cancer, Dysthymia, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Breast Cancer - Palliative, Breast Cancer - Male, Osteolytic Bone Metastases of Breast Cancer

Women Aren't Better at Reading People's Faces After All

Posted 7 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, May 19, 2017 – When it comes to spotting a familiar face, men are just as gifted as women, a new study suggests. The finding contradicts the widely held belief that women are better at recognizing faces and reading facial expressions than men are, the Penn State researchers said. "There has been common lore in the behavioral literature that women do better than men in many types of face-processing tasks, such as face recognition and detecting and categorizing facial expressions, although, when you look in the empirical literature, the findings are not so clear-cut," said researcher Suzy Scherf. She is an assistant professor of psychology and neuroscience. "I went into this work fully expecting to see an effect of biological sex on the part of the observer in facial recognition – and we did not find any. And we looked really hard," she added in a Penn State news release. Facial ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Bipolar Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Schizophrenia, Paranoid Disorder, Schizoaffective Disorder, Dysthymia, Psychiatric Disorders, Diagnosis and Investigation

Mechanical Heart Valve Noise May Mean Sleepless Nights

Posted 7 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, May 19, 2017 – Nearly 1 in 4 people with a mechanical heart valve says the noise it makes disrupts their sleep, a new study finds. "For some patients the closing sound of their mechanical heart valve reduces their quality of life, disturbs their sleep, causes them to avoid social situations, and leads to depression and anxiety," said study lead author Kjersti Oterhals. She is a nurse researcher at Haukeland University Hospital in Bergen, Norway. The Norwegian researchers surveyed 245 patients with a mechanical aortic heart valve. The participants' average age was 60. Eighty-seven percent of men and 75 percent of women said that they were able to hear the valve. Twenty-three percent said the sound disturbed them during sleep and 9 percent said it disturbed them during the day. "Most of us need a quiet environment when we are going to sleep and these patients found it hard to ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Dysthymia, Prosthetic Heart Valves, Prosthetic Heart Valves - Mechanical Valves, Mitral Insufficiency, Aortic Stenosis, Mitral Stenosis, Aortic Insufficiency, Valvular Heart Disease

Suicide by Insulin?

Posted 7 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 18, 2017 – Insulin typically saves the lives of those with diabetes, but it can also be a way for some people to kill themselves, a new review warns. People with the blood sugar disease tend to suffer higher rates of depression, the researchers explained. And suicide or suicide attempts using insulin or other diabetes medications that lower blood sugar levels may not always be an easy-to-spot attempt at self-harm, they added. "Some suicides with insulin are likely missed in people with diabetes, just as [suicide may be missed] in people without diabetes using other medications or after a car accident. Could a suicide using insulin be missed? Absolutely," said Alicia McAuliffe-Fogarty, vice president of lifestyle management at the American Diabetes Association. Insulin is a natural hormone produced by the body. Its job is to help usher the sugar from foods into the body's ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Major Depressive Disorder, Insulin, Dysthymia, Diabetes Mellitus, Depressive Psychosis

Bullied in 5th Grade, Prone to Drug Abuse by High School

Posted 18 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 8, 2017 – A child bullied in fifth grade is more likely to show signs of depression in seventh grade, and abuse substances like alcohol, marijuana or tobacco in 10th grade, researchers say. Their study of more than 4,000 kids in Los Angeles, Houston and Birmingham, Ala., suggests a dangerous trajectory between not-uncommon childhood abuse and worrisome behavior in high school. "Our study suggests that it's important to take peer victimization seriously," said study co-author Valerie Earnshaw. She's an assistant professor in human development and family studies at the University of Delaware. "There's still sometimes this idea that peer victimization and bullying are a normal part of adolescence and that lots of kids will experience it, so it's fine. But, this study adds to a growing body of evidence that peer victimization and bullying are not fine," Earnshaw said. To ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Major Depressive Disorder, Drug Dependence, Dysthymia, Substance Abuse, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse

After Suicide Attempt, a Phone Call Could Save a Life

Posted 18 days ago by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, May 7, 2017 – A simple phone call can make a big difference to someone who's attempted suicide and may be contemplating another try. A new study found that follow-up phone calls after a suicidal patient was discharged from a hospital emergency department reduced future suicide attempts by 30 percent. The study included nearly 1,400 patients in eight locations across the United States who were provided with interventions that included specialized screening, safety planning guidance and follow-up phone calls. "People who are suicidal are often disconnected and socially isolated. So any positive contact with the world can make them feel better," said study co-author Dr. Michael Allen. He's a professor of psychiatry and emergency medicine at the University of Colorado Anschutz. Allen is also medical director of Rocky Mountain Crisis Partners in Denver, which has implemented a ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Major Depressive Disorder, Postpartum Depression, Dysthymia, Seasonal Affective Disorder, Neurotic Depression, Depressive Psychosis

Teen Suicide Thoughts, Self-Harm Cases Double in a Decade

Posted 4 May 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 4, 2017 – A controversial new Netflix series, "13 Reasons Why," has renewed public focus on the tragedy of teen suicide – and a new study suggests its release is timely. The report finds that the number of American kids admitted to children's hospitals for suicidal thoughts or self-harm more than doubled during the last decade. Diagnoses of suicidal thoughts or attempted self-harm increased from 0.67 percent of all kids treated in 2008 to 1.79 percent in 2015, according to data from 32 children's hospitals across the United States. Suicidal thoughts or attempts among kids appear to fluctuate with the school calendar, reaching their lowest levels during the summer and spiking in the fall and spring, said lead researcher Dr. Gregory Plemmons. He is an associate professor of pediatrics at Vanderbilt University, in Nashville, Tenn. "Clearly, school can be a driver" for teen ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Major Depressive Disorder, Dysthymia

Reasons Why Parents Should Be Wary of '13 Reasons Why'

Posted 4 May 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 4, 2017 – It started as a bestselling novel aimed at teens. In 2007, Thirteen Reasons Why, by first-time novelist Jay Asher, outlined the story of a 16-year-old named Hannah Baker. In the book, Hannah recounts – from beyond the grave – the high school gossip, humiliation, bullying, invasion of privacy, betrayal and sexual assault that led her to suicide. In the spring of 2017, "13 Reasons Why" became an even more popular 13-episode series on Netflix. How popular? Netflix doesn't provide ratings. But in the month since it began streaming in its entirety, evidence of the series' wide reach can be seen in the young binge-watchers who've swamped social media to discuss the show. Twitter, for one, has already been deluged with 11 million series-related tweets. And that, says Variety magazine, makes the Netflix hit "the most tweeted-about show of 2017" so far. According to ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Dysthymia, Psychiatric Disorders

Grieving Friends Often Find Support Online

Posted 27 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 26, 2017 – When one person in a circle of friends dies, the others get closer, a new study finds. Researchers analyzed online interactions among hundreds of thousands of people after the death of a friend. They found a sharp uptick in interactions between people who lost a mutual friend immediately after the death. "It was a surprise to see just how much people came together after a mutual friend's death and how long this persisted," said study leader William Hobbs. A postdoctoral fellow at Northeastern University in Boston, he conducted the research as a University of California, San Diego doctoral student in political science. The study focused on Facebook comments, posts and photo tags by close friends and acquaintances of the person who died, and it spanned four years before and after the death. Hobbs and his colleagues found that these interactions increased right ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Major Depressive Disorder, Dysthymia

Genes May Govern Your Risk for PTSD

Posted 26 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 26, 2017 – Surviving trauma such as assault, rape or wartime combat can leave a person emotionally devastated. Now, new research suggests your genes may help determine whether you go on to suffer post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). "Our finding that PTSD is heritable suggests that our genes contain clues for why some people develop PTSD and others do not, despite having experienced a similar event," said lead researcher Karestan Koenen. The large study found that the genetic risk for PTSD is much higher for women than men. And it adds to evidence that mental ills such as schizophrenia share genetic links with PTSD, said Koenen, a professor of psychiatric epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health. Most people experience some level psychological distress after living through a severe or life-threatening experience. They may replay the event repeatedly in ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Diabetes, Type 2, Major Depressive Disorder, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Dementia, Dysthymia, Psychiatric Disorders, Diagnosis and Investigation

Kids Face Their Own Death Risks When a Sibling Dies

Posted 24 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 24, 2017 – The loss of a sibling can take an emotional toll on a child left behind. Now, new research shows these surviving children may even face a higher risk of early death themselves. The study of more than 5 million children found the greatest risk in the year after a brother or sister's death, and among kids who lost a same-sex sibling or one who was close in age. "Health care professionals should be aware of children's vulnerability after experiencing sibling death... Social support may help to reduce the level of grief and minimize potential adverse health effects on the bereaved individuals," study author Yongfu Yu and co-authors wrote. Yu is a doctoral fellow at Aarhus University Hospital in Denmark. Yu's team analyzed data from more than 5 million children in Denmark and Sweden. Between the ages of 6 months and 18 years, about 1 percent (55,818) lost a sibling. ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Major Depressive Disorder, Dysthymia

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Related Condition Support Groups

Neurotic Depression, Depression

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citalopram, sertraline, bupropion, amitriptyline, fluoxetine, Elavil, paroxetine, duloxetine, fluvoxamine, Endep, Vanatrip