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Nearly 4 Million Worldwide Die Each Year From Asthma, COPD

Posted 7 hours ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 16, 2017 – Two major chronic lung diseases – asthma and COPD – kill nearly 4 million people worldwide annually, a new report finds. The study calculates that 3.2 million people died in 2015 from COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) – a group of lung conditions that includes emphysema and chronic bronchitis, often tied to smoking. Asthma caused another 400,000 deaths, the report found. While asthma is more common, COPD is much more deadly. And while both conditions can be treated, many people remain undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. In addition, in many countries, treatment – if it exists at all – may be at insufficient levels, the research team added. "Although much of the burden [from these illnesses] is either preventable or treatable with affordable interventions, these diseases have received less attention than other prominent non-communicable diseases like ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Asthma, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Bronchitis, Asthma - Maintenance, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Maintenance, Dyspnea, Fluticasone, Qvar, Ribavirin, Asthma - Acute, Budesonide, Flovent, Cough and Nasal Congestion, Entocort, Tobramycin, Bronchial, Mometasone, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Acute, Entocort EC

Air Purifiers May Help the Smog-Stressed Heart

Posted 2 days 12 hours ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 14, 2017 – High levels of air pollution can harm heart health, but air purifiers may protect against the threat, according to a small study from China. The study included 55 healthy college students who used real or fake air purifiers in their dormitory rooms. Researchers measured the students' indoor and outdoor exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5), a component of air pollution emitted from vehicles, factories, power plants, fires and smoking. Exposure to high PM2.5 levels increased students' stress hormones and triggered metabolic changes that may increase heart disease risk, the researchers said. Using air purifiers reduced indoor levels of PM2.5 by an average 82 percent and led to short-term declines in stress hormone levels. After 24 hours of air purifier use, PM2.5 levels were within the World Health Organization's safe range, the study found. The findings ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Bronchitis, Dyspnea, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Bronchiectasis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Croup, Reversible Airways Disease

Drowning Can Occur Hours After Swimming

Posted 16 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 31, 2017 – While it happens rarely, a person can drown on dry land hours after having been in the water. There are two types of such drowning, dry drowning and secondary drowning, explained Dr. Jessica Lanerie, an associate professor at the Texas A&M College of Medicine. "These are sometimes used interchangeably, but they are very different," she said in a school news release. "Dry drowning typically happens minutes after submersion, when water reaches the vocal cords and causes them to spasm, which blocks off the airway. Secondary drowning is what we have been seeing a lot more in the news, and that happens within 24 hours after leaving the water," she added. In secondary drowning, water gets into the lungs and remains there for several hours, triggering inflammation that can lead to blockage of the lower airways and difficulty breathing. Secondary drowning is extremely ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Dyspnea, Respiratory Tract Disease, Aspiration Pneumonia, Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Respiratory Depression

Climate Change May Trigger 60,000 More Premature Deaths by 2030

Posted 16 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 31, 2017 – If nothing is done to address climate change, tens of thousands more early deaths may occur worldwide from exposure to air pollution in the coming decades, a new study contends. Increases in air pollution caused by rising temperatures will trigger an additional 60,000 premature deaths each year around the globe by 2030, and as many as 260,000 more premature deaths annually by 2100, according to the results of several different climate models. More people will die from diseases like heart attack, stroke, lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which are exacerbated by exposure to smog-laden air, said study co-author Jason West. He's an associate professor of environmental sciences and engineering with the University of North Carolina's Gillings School of Global Public Health. The projected deaths occur "under a scenario where no big policies ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Asthma, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Bronchitis, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Maintenance, Dyspnea, Dehydration, Cough and Nasal Congestion, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Acute, Bronchiectasis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Heat Stress, Reversible Airways Disease

Health Tip: Worried About Lung Disease?

Posted 17 days ago by Drugs.com

-- Subtle changes in your breathing may be easy to miss, but they can be important warning signs of lung disease. The American Lung Association says symptoms to be concerned about include: A cough that persists for a month or longer, or coughing up blood. Feeling short of breath, or having difficulty breathing. Persistent production of mucus that lasts for a month or longer. Wheezing. Chest pain that occurs for unknown reasons – particularly when you cough or inhale – that lasts for at least a month. Read more

Related support groups: Asthma, Bronchitis, Angina, Dyspnea, Bronchiectasis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Croup, Allergic Asthma, Reversible Airways Disease

Rush Hour Pollution May Be Worse Than Thought

Posted 20 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 28, 2017 – Ever wonder what you're inhaling as you idle in rush-hour traffic? New research finds air pollution levels in cars are much higher than previously believed. "We found that people are likely getting a double whammy of exposure in terms of health during rush-hour commutes," said Michael Bergin, a professor of civil and environmental engineering at Duke University, in Durham, N.C. He and his colleagues installed sensors inside about 30 cars going to and from downtown Atlanta. Over the 60 commutes, they found that levels of some types of harmful particulate air pollution in the cars were twice as high as levels detected by widely used roadside sensors. "If these chemicals are as bad for people as many researchers believe, then commuters should seriously be rethinking their driving habits," Bergin added in a university news release. The contaminated air particles can ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Asthma, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Bronchitis, Dyspnea, Sore Throat, Cough and Nasal Congestion, Bronchiectasis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Croup, Allergic Asthma, Reversible Airways Disease

Health Tip: When Air Quality is Poor

Posted 10 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Poor air quality is a serious issue for people with breathing problems, such as asthma. When air quality is poor, the National Weather Service suggests: If you're exercising outdoors, make your routine less strenuous than usual Take more frequent breaks. And shorten the length of your workout. Move planned outdoor activities to another day or indoors. If that's not possible, schedule activities in the morning, when air quality generally is better. Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Asthma, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Bronchitis, Asthma - Maintenance, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Maintenance, Dyspnea, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Acute, Bronchiectasis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Croup, Allergic Asthma, Reversible Airways Disease, Bronchospastic Disease

Even at Low Levels, Dirty Air Raises Death Risk for U.S. Seniors

Posted 28 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 28, 2017 – Air pollution may shorten the lives of American seniors, even in areas where levels fall below national safety standards, new research indicates. Although it's possible that factors other than air pollution are responsible for the increase in premature deaths among older adults, study co-author Francesca Dominici said the findings are "bulletproof evidence of increased risk of deaths due to polluted air in the U.S. "Make no mistake. We need to strengthen, not weaken, [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency] air pollution standards," said Dominici, a professor of biostatistics at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston. "We need to increase, not reduce, the EPA research funding." The investigators launched their research to determine whether pollution levels considered to be acceptable might still be hazardous to human health. "There is extensive ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Asthma, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Bronchitis, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Maintenance, Dyspnea, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Acute, Bronchiectasis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Croup, Bronchospastic Disease, Reversible Airways Disease

Childhood Poverty May Predict Heart Failure in Adulthood

Posted 26 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 26, 2017 – Growing up poor might put you at risk for heart failure in adulthood, a new study suggests. Heart failure, a progressive condition, means the heart isn't pumping as well as it should. This causes fatigue and shortness of breath, and can make everyday activities difficult to carry out. Finnish researchers looked at household income for hundreds of children in 1980. The findings showed that kids from poor families were more likely than richer children to have an enlarged, poorly functioning lower left heart chamber – a sign of heart failure – three decades later. The results aren't surprising, health experts say. "There are continuing socioeconomic inequalities in health across generations and across countries," said Rebecca Hardy, from the Institute of Epidemiology and Health at University College London in England. Hardy, who is with the Lifelong Health and ... Read more

Related support groups: Lisinopril, Fatigue, Losartan, Benicar, Diovan, Heart Failure, Congestive Heart Failure, Ramipril, Dyspnea, Cozaar, Valsartan, Micardis, Enalapril, Benazepril, Avapro, Atacand, Irbesartan, Perindopril, Candesartan, Left Ventricular Dysfunction

Health Tip: Want Healthier Lungs?

Posted 22 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Though you can't live without them, we'll bet you haven't spent much time thinking about how to take care of your lungs. The American Lung Association has these suggestions: Don't start smoking; if you are a smoker, quit. Don't allow smoking in your home or car. Test your home for radon. Avoid the outdoors when air quality is poor. Prevent lung infections by washing your hands frequently, getting any recommended vaccines, and avoiding people who are sick. Exercise regularly to keep your lungs strong and healthy. See your health care provider regularly. Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Dyspnea, Lung Cancer, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Acute, Respiratory Tract Disease

First-Try Antibiotics Now Fail in 1 in 4 Adult Pneumonia Cases

Posted 22 May 2017 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, May 21, 2017 – The first prescription of an antibiotic that the average U.S. adult with pneumonia receives is now ineffective in about a quarter of cases, a new study finds. In these cases, more or different antibiotics were needed, or the patient's condition worsened to require ER admission or hospitalization within a month of the antibiotics being taken, the research team said. The results are "concerning," because "pneumonia is the leading cause of death from infectious disease in the United States," said lead researcher Dr. James McKinnell, an infectious disease specialist at LA BioMed, a California-based research foundation. Speaking in a news release from the American Thoracic Society, he added that, "the additional antibiotic therapy noted in the study increases the risk of antibiotic resistance and complications like C. difficile infection, which is difficult to treat ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Pneumonia, Dyspnea, Bronchiectasis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Pneumonia with Cystic Fibrosis

4 in 10 Americans Still Breathe Dirty Air

Posted 19 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 19, 2017 – Air quality in the United States is improving overall, but not enough for the nearly 40 percent of Americans who live in counties with unhealthy levels of air pollution. That's the conclusion of the American Lung Association's annual report, which shows that 125 million Americans were exposed to high levels of either ozone or particle pollution in 2013-15. This puts them at risk for premature death and other serious health threats such as lung cancer, asthma attacks, cardiovascular damage, and developmental and reproductive problems, the report said. "This year's 'State of the Air' report is a testament to the success of the Clean Air Act, which has reduced air pollution in much of the nation," Harold Wimmer, president and CEO of the American Lung Association, said in a news release from the organization. "As a result, Americans' lung health is far better ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Asthma, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Bronchitis, Asthma - Maintenance, Dyspnea, Asthma - Acute, Poisoning, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Acute, Bronchiectasis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Allergic Asthma, Pulmonary Impairment, Reversible Airways Disease

Health Tip: Asthma and Air Pollution

Posted 6 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Air pollution makes the air unhealthy – a particularly serious problem for people with asthma. The American Academy of Family Physicians says you should talk with your doctor about: Symptoms of exposure to air pollution, which could include chest pain and coughing. Long-term medication to manage asthma. Whether you are more sensitive to polluted air than the average person. Read more

Related support groups: Bronchitis, Dyspnea, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Acute, Bronchiectasis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Croup

Can Mom's Vitamin E Head Off Child's Asthma Risk?

Posted 5 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, March 4, 2017 – Kids born to moms with low levels of vitamin E might be more likely to develop asthma, new research suggests. When moms had low levels of a specific type of vitamin E measured right after birth, their children were more likely to develop wheezing and to have been treated with asthma medications in their first two years of life, the study found. "The major sources of vitamin E are oils" such as sunflower, safflower, corn, soy and canola oils, study lead author Dr. Cosby Stone said in a news release from the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI). Stone said his team's previous research in mice had suggested the link between vitamin E and asthma. Stone is with Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville. "We hypothesized that maternal vitamin E levels, reflecting levels that the fetus encounters during pregnancy," would affect how kids ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Asthma, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Bronchitis, Asthma - Maintenance, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Maintenance, Dyspnea, Asthma - Acute, Cough and Nasal Congestion, Vitamin E, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Acute, Bronchiectasis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Croup, Allergic Asthma, Aquasol E, Alpha E, E-400 Clear, E-Max-1000, Vita-Plus E Natural

Gene Therapy: A Breakthrough for Sickle Cell Anemia?

Posted 2 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 1, 2017 – Researchers are reporting early success using gene therapy to treat, or even potentially cure, sickle cell anemia. The findings come from just one patient, a teenage boy in France. But more than 15 months after receiving the treatment, he remained free of symptoms and his usual medications. That's a big change from his situation before the gene therapy, according to his doctors at Necker Children's Hospital in Paris. For years, the boy had been suffering bouts of severe pain, as well as other sickle cell complications that affected his lungs, bones and spleen. Medical experts stressed, however, that much more research lies ahead before gene therapy can become an option for sickle cell anemia. It's not clear how long the benefits will last, they said. And the approach obviously has to be tested in more patients. "This is not right around the corner," said Dr. ... Read more

Related support groups: Fatigue, Dyspnea, Anemia - Sickle Cell

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