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Dermatitis News

Have Eczema? No Need for Bleach Baths, Study Suggests

Posted 7 Dec 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 7, 2017 – Bathing in water is just as effective for the treatment of eczema as bathing in a bleach solution, a new review of previous research indicates. Doctors sometimes recommend a bleach bath, which is a mixture of a small amount of bleach in a pool of cool or warm water. But investigators say the finding should encourage people with eczema to bathe regularly with just water, without fear of drying out their skin. It should also help people avoid the stinging and burning that can come with a bleach bath. "I don't know if it throws the baby out with the bathwater, but bleach baths lack the evidence to support how commonly they are being recommended," said senior author Dr. Jonathan Silverberg. "The water baths appear to be doing most of the heavy lifting. If bleach is adding any benefit, it's quite modest." Silverberg is an assistant professor of dermatology at ... Read more

Related support groups: Eczema, Dermatitis, Contact Dermatitis, Atopic Dermatitis

Prolonged Breast-Feeding May Guard Against Teen Eczema

Posted 13 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 13, 2017 – Encouraging new mothers to stick with breast-feeding may halve the already small risk that infants will develop eczema when they hit their teens, new research suggests. And while the study also found no impact on teenage asthma risk, at least one U.S. pediatrician said other studies have supported the role of breast-feeding in potentially cutting a child's risk of developing allergies or asthma. The new findings stem from an ongoing investigation tracking some of the protective benefits of breast-feeding among infants reared in the eastern European country of Belarus. The study didn't compare mothers who did not breast-feed with those who did, and it didn't prove a cause-and-effect link between prolonged breast-feeding and eczema or asthma risk. Rather, researchers looked at how infants fared down the road when mothers participated in a program that encouraged ... Read more

Related support groups: Eczema, Dermatitis, Contact Dermatitis, Atopic Dermatitis, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Lactation Augmentation

Newer Eczema Treatments Offer Relief

Posted 27 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 27, 2017 – Children and adults with eczema shouldn't suffer in silence because new, improved treatments can do more to help ease the uncomfortable, itchy rash associated with the skin condition. Many adults diagnosed with eczema (atopic dermatitis) actually had the condition since they were children but were never diagnosed, explained Dr. Luz Fonacier. She is an allergist in Mineola, N.Y., and an American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) board member. "Atopic dermatitis is underdiagnosed in the United States," Fonacier said in an ACAAI news release. "Many adults don't seek out medical care, preferring to self-treat instead, either with home remedies or over-the-counter drugs. Often, they aren't aware they have eczema, and they also don't know treatments have changed a lot in the last few years. There are new drugs and topical medications that can make a ... Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash, Eczema, Dermatitis, Clobetasol, Contact Dermatitis, Fluocinonide, Atopic Dermatitis, Desonide, Clobex, Kenalog, Desoximetasone, Elocon, Perioral Dermatitis, Eucrisa, Topicort, Dupixent, Betamethasone/Clotrimazole, Lidex, Dermatitis Herpetiformis, Nystatin/Triamcinolone

Black Children Missing Out on Eczema Treatment

Posted 13 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 13, 2017 – Black children may have more severe eczema than white children, but they are less likely to visit a doctor for this common inflammatory skin condition, new research shows. Eczema causes the skin to become red and itchy. Roughly 11 percent of children in the United States are affected by the condition, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "Previous studies have demonstrated disparities in overall health care utilization among racial and ethnic minorities, but few studies have examined this question specifically for eczema," said senior study author Dr. Junko Takeshita. She is an assistant professor of dermatology and epidemiology at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine. "This is the first study to look at racial and ethnic differences in health care utilization for eczema on an individual level rather than ... Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash, Eczema, Dermatitis, Clobetasol, Contact Dermatitis, Fluocinonide, Atopic Dermatitis, Desonide, Clobex, Kenalog, Fleet, Desoximetasone, Elocon, Biafine, Skin Care, Vaseline, Aquaphor, Topicort, Aveeno, Dermatitis Herpetiformis

Eczema Can Take a Toll on Adults

Posted 27 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 27, 2017 – The itchy, rashy skin condition eczema sometimes takes a heavier toll on adults than children, an expert says. "Adult eczema patients may have dealt with their symptoms for their entire lives, which can be draining, or they may experience symptoms for the first time as adults, which can be a difficult adjustment," said Dr. Jonathan Silverberg, an assistant professor at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. "Either way, this condition can take a real toll on them," added Silverberg, director of Northwestern's Multidisciplinary Eczema Center. Some people mistakenly regard eczema as a childhood disease and not a serious health problem for adults, he said. "People who aren't familiar with the disease might say, 'It's just eczema.' But for many patients, it's not 'just eczema.' It can be debilitating," Silverberg said in a news release ... Read more

Related support groups: Eczema, Dermatitis, Clobetasol, Contact Dermatitis, Fluocinonide, Atopic Dermatitis, Desonide, Clobex, Kenalog, Desoximetasone, Elocon, Topicort, Dermatitis Herpetiformis, Lidex, Cloderm, Vanos, Halog, Cordran, Halobetasol, Locoid

Silk Clothes Won't Soothe Eczema's Itch

Posted 11 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 11, 2017 – Although it may feel nice against the skin, new research says silk clothing offers little benefit for kids with eczema. Eczema is a skin condition that can cause a rash and itchiness, and some parents believe that clothing can either worsen or soothe the problem. This prompts some to avoid dressing their children in wool clothes, and instead dress them in only fine weave fabrics such as cotton or silk. This new research included 300 children from the United Kingdom. They were between the ages of 1 and 15. All had moderate to severe eczema. During the study, they received standard care for their skin condition and wore either their usual clothing or silk garments. After six months, there was no difference in eczema severity, use of medication or quality of life between the two groups, the study authors said. "The results of this trial suggest that silk garments ... Read more

Related support groups: Eczema, Dermatitis, Contact Dermatitis, Atopic Dermatitis

Dupixent Approved to Treat Eczema

Posted 28 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 28, 2017 – Dupixent (dupilumab) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat moderate-to-severe eczema that isn't well controlled by topical medication. Eczema, medically called atopic dermatitis, is a chronic disease that causes inflammation of the skin, leading to red, scaly patches. The patches of itchy skin – when scratched – can lead to swelling, cracking skin that leaks fluid, the FDA said Tuesday in a news release. The injected drug Dupixent is designed to thwart a protein that causes skin inflammation. Its effectiveness was evaluated in clinical studies involving more than 2,100 people. The most common side effects included injection-site reactions, cold sores, and eye inflammation. More serious adverse effects included severe allergic reactions, pink eye and inflammation of the eye's cornea. The FDA granted approval of Dupixent to ... Read more

Related support groups: Eczema, Dermatitis, Contact Dermatitis, Atopic Dermatitis, Dupixent

FDA Approves Dupixent (dupilumab) for Eczema

Posted 28 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

March 28, 2017 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Dupixent (dupilumab) injection to treat adults with moderate-to-severe eczema (atopic dermatitis). Dupixent is intended for patients whose eczema is not controlled adequately by topical therapies, or those for whom topical therapies are not advisable. Dupixent can be used with or without topical corticosteroids. “FDA’s approval of Dupixent demonstrates our commitment to approving new and innovative therapies for patients with skin disease,” said Julie Beitz, M.D., director of the Office of Drug Evaluation III in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “Eczema can cause significant skin irritation and discomfort for patients, so it is important to have a variety of treatment options available to patients, including those patients whose disease is not controlled by topical therapies.” Atopic dermatitis, a c ... Read more

Related support groups: Eczema, Dermatitis, Dermatological Disorders, Atopic Dermatitis, Dupixent, Dupilumab

FDA Approves Eucrisa (crisaborole) for Eczema

Posted 15 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

December 14, 2016 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Eucrisa (crisaborole) ointment to treat mild to moderate eczema (atopic dermatitis) in patients two years of age and older. Atopic dermatitis, a chronic inflammatory skin disease, is often referred to as "eczema," which is a general term for the several types of inflammation of the skin. Atopic dermatitis is the most common of the many types of eczema and onset typically begins in childhood and can last through adulthood. The cause of atopic dermatitis is a combination of genetic, immune and environmental factors. In atopic dermatitis, the skin develops red, scaly and crusted bumps, which are extremely itchy. Scratching leads to swelling, cracking, "weeping" clear fluid, and finally, coarsening and thickening of the skin. "Today’s approval provides another treatment option for patients dealing with mild to m ... Read more

Related support groups: Eczema, Dermatitis, Atopic Dermatitis, Eucrisa, Crisaborole

Can Protein in Common Skin Bacteria Offer Disease Protection?

Posted 23 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 23, 2016 – Our most common skin bacteria may help shield us from some skin diseases, a new study suggests. Swedish researchers report that Propionibacterium acnes secretes a protein called RoxP that protects against bacteria that are believed to contribute to several skin disorders. Specifically, RoxP protects against skin cell damage called oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen bacteria. UV radiation from the sun is a common cause of oxidative stress on the skin. Oxidative stress is believed to contribute to several skin diseases, including eczema, psoriasis and skin cancer. The protective effect of RoxP is as strong as antioxidants such as vitamins C and E, according to the study published recently in the journal Scientific Reports. "This protein is important for the bacterium's very survival on our skin. The bacterium improves its living environment by secreting ... Read more

Related support groups: Acne, Psoriasis, Eczema, Rosacea, Dermatitis, Contact Dermatitis, Basal Cell Carcinoma, Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Atopic Dermatitis, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, History - Skin Cancer, Minor Skin Conditions, Minor Skin Irritation

Eczema's Effects More Than Skin Deep

Posted 29 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 29, 2016 – People dealing with the itchy skin condition known as eczema may have other medical conditions to cope with as well, including heart disease, a dermatologist says. Eczema, which causes dry, red patches of skin and intense itchiness, affects an estimated one-quarter of children in the United States. And, as many as seven million adults also have eczema, Dr. Jonathan Silverberg said in an American Academy of Dermatology news release. "Although it affects the skin, eczema is not just skin-deep. This disease can have a serious impact on patients' quality of life and overall health, both physically and mentally," Silverberg said. He's assistant professor in dermatology, medical social sciences and preventive medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. Eczema has been linked to an increased risk of health conditions such as asthma, hay ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Allergic Reactions, Asthma, Heart Disease, Eczema, Dermatitis, Contact Dermatitis, Anaphylaxis, Asthma - Acute, Atopic Dermatitis, Diagnosis and Investigation, Allergic Asthma, Reversible Airways Disease

'Hard' Tap Water Linked to Eczema in Babies

Posted 2 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 1, 2016 – "Hard," mineral-laden water may increase the risk of a baby getting the skin condition eczema, a new British study suggests. Eczema is a chronic condition marked by itchiness and rashes. The study included 1,300 3-month old infants from across the United Kingdom. Researchers checked hardness – the water's mineral content – and chlorine levels in the water supply where the babies lived. Babies who lived in areas with hard water were up to 87 percent more likely to have eczema, the study found. "Our study builds on growing evidence of a link between exposure to hard water and the risk of developing eczema in childhood," said lead author Dr. Carsten Flohr, from the Institute of Dermatology at King's College London. The study wasn't designed to prove a cause-and-effect relationship, so further research is needed to learn more about this apparent link, Flohr ... Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash, Eczema, Dermatitis, Contact Dermatitis, Atopic Dermatitis, Minor Skin Irritation, Minor Skin Conditions

Health Tip: Got Eczema?

Posted 28 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Bleach bath therapy may be an effective way to manage eczema, if it's approved by the patient's dermatologist. The American Academy of Dermatology suggests: Carefully measure the amount of bleach to mix with bath water. Use 1/2 cup bleach in a full tub, 1/4 cup in a half-full tub, or one teaspoon of bleach per gallon of water for a baby or toddler. Use only regular 6 percent strength bleach, never concentrated. Always pour bleach into the tub and never apply directly to skin. Allow the tub to finish filling before the person with eczema climbs in. Discuss with the dermatologist the appropriate length of the bleach bath – usually between five minutes and 10 minutes. As soon as the person emerges from the bath, gently pat the skin dry and apply any prescribed eczema medication. Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash, Eczema, Dry Skin, Dermatitis, Contact Dermatitis, Atopic Dermatitis, Dermatitis Herpetiformis, Minor Skin Conditions, Dermatitis - Drug-Induced, Minor Skin Irritation

Is the 'No-Shampoo' Trend a Healthy One?

Posted 30 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 29, 2015 – A new trend in beauty is based on the idea that less is more – at least when it comes to shampooing your hair. Some people – including celebrity Kim Kardashian – have stopped shampooing their hair regularly, or even altogether, based on the belief that the detergents in shampoo strip hair of its healthy natural oils. This form of hair care has even been dubbed "no-poo." Kardashian recently revealed that she washes her hair only every five days. But is this truly healthy for your hair and scalp? That largely depends on the type of head you have, according to skin and hair experts. "It's not a one-size-fits-all situation," said Dr. Angela Lamb, director of Westside Mount Sinai Dermatology in New York City. "It all depends on your hair type. There are some hair types that would tolerate it better than others." "No-poo" proponents clean their hair and scalp with ... Read more

Related support groups: Alopecia, Dry Skin, Dermatitis, Dermatological Disorders, Dandruff

Health Tip: Protect Your Skin at Work

Posted 16 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

-- The workplace can be hard on hands, especially if you work near harsh chemicals or in an environment that takes a toll on your skin. The American Academy of Family Physicians suggests: Wear protective clothing and equipment, such as gloves and aprons, to keep oils, grease and caustic chemicals off your skin. After work, remove clothing that has been in contact with chemicals. Put on newly washed clothing the next day. Don't use mineral spirits, turpentine, gasoline or kerosene to clean your skin. After washing your hands with soap and water, apply lotion, cream or petroleum jelly. Have an emergency plan to safely and quickly remove chemicals that touch your skin or eyes. Don't eat, drink or smoke in your work space If you work outside, regularly apply sunscreen. Read more

Related support groups: Dermatitis, Sunburn, Dermatological Disorders

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Eczema, Contact Dermatitis, Atopic Dermatitis, Perioral Dermatitis, Dermatitis Herpetiformis, Dermatitis - Drug-Induced, Poison Ivy, Poison Oak, Poison Sumac, Dermatological Disorders

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