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Related terms: Celiac disease, sprue, Celiac sprue, Gluten intolerance, Gluten-sensitive enteropathy, Nontropical sprue, Sprue

Health Tip: Going Gluten-Free?

Posted 20 Dec 2017 by Drugs.com

-- If you've got celiac disease or have another reason to go gluten-free, there are lots of ways to avoid dietary wheat, rye and barley. The American Diabetes Association says healthier gluten-free options include: Amaranth. Arrowroot. Beans (kidney, black, soy, navy, pinto). Buckwheat. Corn. Flax. Gluten-free baked products (made from corn, rice, soy, nut, teff or potato flour). Kasha. Millet. Polenta. Potatoes. Quinoa. Rice. Sorghum. Soy. Tapioca. Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Celiac Disease

Where There's Type 1 Diabetes, Celiac Disease May Follow

Posted 10 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 10, 2017 – Parents of young children with type 1 diabetes need to be on the lookout for symptoms of another autoimmune condition – celiac disease, new research suggests. The study found these youngsters appear to face a nearly tripled risk of developing celiac disease autoantibodies, which eventually can lead to the disorder. "Type 1 diabetes and celiac disease are closely related genetically," explained study author Dr. William Hagopian. "People with one disease tend to get the other. People who have type 1 diabetes autoantibodies should get screened for celiac autoantibodies," Hagopian said. He directs the diabetes program at the Pacific Northwest Research Institute in Seattle. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that causes the body's immune system to mistakenly attack the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, according to the American Diabetes Association. ... Read more

Related support groups: Insulin, Osteoporosis, Diabetes, Type 1, Iron Deficiency Anemia, Fracture, bone, Celiac Disease, Prevention of Osteoporosis, Diabetic Ketoacidosis (in DM Type I), Prevention of Fractures, Diabetic Coma (in DM Type I)

Is Gluten-Free Such a Good Idea?

Posted 29 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 29, 2017 – Gluten-free diets are increasingly popular but not a good idea for everyone, doctors say. Gluten is a type of protein found in grains such as wheat, rye and barley. Only people with conditions that require them to avoid gluten – such as celiac disease or gluten sensitivity – should go completely gluten-free, said Dr. Christopher Heron, a family medicine physician at Penn State Medical Group in State College. "The grains found in wheat products are essential to overall health. They provide nutrients that aren't found in most gluten-free foods, Heron said in a university news release. That's why many people with celiac disease need to take a multivitamin, he said. The immune systems of some people react poorly to gluten, resulting in conditions such as celiac disease or gluten sensitivity. "Celiac disease primarily causes inflammation in the small intestine, ... Read more

Related support groups: Celiac Disease

Eating Gluten-Free Without a Medical Reason?

Posted 3 May 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 2, 2017 – Eating "gluten-free" when there's no medical need to do so won't boost your heart health – and might even harm it, a new study warns. Gluten-free diets have soared in popularity in recent years. But, shunning gluten has no heart benefits for people without celiac disease, and it may mean consuming a diet lacking heart-healthy whole grains, according to the quarter-century study. "For the vast majority of people who can tolerate it, restricting gluten to improve your overall health is likely not to be a beneficial strategy," said study leader Dr. Andrew Chan. Gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye and barley. People with celiac disease – less than 1 percent of the U.S. population – have an immune system reaction when they eat gluten, triggering inflammation and intestinal damage. They also have an increased risk of heart disease, but that declines after they ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Celiac Disease

FDA Allows Marketing of First Direct-to-Consumer Tests that Provide Genetic Risk Information for Certain Conditions

Posted 7 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

April 6, 2017 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today allowed marketing of 23andMe Personal Genome Service Genetic Health Risk (GHR) tests for 10 diseases or conditions. These are the first direct-to-consumer (DTC) tests authorized by the FDA that provide information on an individual’s genetic predisposition to certain medical diseases or conditions, which may help to make decisions about lifestyle choices or to inform discussions with a health care professional. “Consumers can now have direct access to certain genetic risk information,” said Jeffrey Shuren, M.D., director of the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health. “But it is important that people understand that genetic risk is just one piece of the bigger puzzle, it does not mean they will or won’t ultimately develop a disease.” The GHR tests are intended to provide genetic risk information to consumers, but the ... Read more

Related support groups: Parkinson's Disease, Alzheimer's Disease, Dystonia, Celiac Disease, Diagnosis and Investigation, Alpha-1 Proteinase Inhibitor Deficiency

A Surprising Culprit Behind Celiac Disease?

Posted 6 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 6, 2017 – A typically harmless type of virus might sometimes trigger celiac disease, a new study suggests. Celiac disease is caused by an abnormal immune response to the protein gluten, which is found in wheat, rye and barley. The condition damages the lining of the small intestine, and the only effective treatment is a gluten-free diet. This new study found that when mice were infected with particular strains of a common human intestinal reovirus, their immune system could not tolerate gluten. Patients with celiac disease also had much higher levels of antibodies against reoviruses than those without the autoimmune disease, the researchers said. "This study clearly shows that a virus that is not clinically symptomatic can still do bad things to the immune system and set the stage for an autoimmune disorder, and for celiac disease in particular," said senior study ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 1, Celiac Disease, Diagnosis and Investigation

FDA OKs 1st At-Home Genetic Tests for 10 Disorders

Posted 6 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 6, 2017 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the first home genetic tests for 10 health risks, including Parkinson's disease and late-onset Alzheimer's. The approval – granted to the California-based company 23andMe Inc. – could help test users make lifestyle choices or spark important discussions with health care providers, the FDA said. "Consumers can now have direct access to certain genetic risk information," Dr. Jeffrey Shuren, director of the FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health, said Thursday in an agency news release. "But, it is important that people understand that genetic risk is just one piece of the bigger puzzle. It does not mean they will or won't ultimately develop a disease," he added. Along with genetics, many things can contribute to disease and illness, including lifestyle and environmental factors, the FDA said. The ... Read more

Related support groups: Parkinson's Disease, Alzheimer's Disease, Celiac Disease, Diagnosis and Investigation, Parkinsonism, Hemophilia, Gaucher Disease

Study Links Celiac Disease, Anorexia

Posted 4 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 4, 2017 – Young women with celiac disease may face a heightened risk of being diagnosed with anorexia, a new study suggests. The Swedish researchers found the increased risk for these women was present both before and after their celiac diagnosis. Celiac disease is a digestive disorder where a person cannot tolerate gluten, a component of wheat, barley and rye. The reasons for the link are not completely clear and the study, published online April 3 in the journal Pediatrics, did not prove that celiac disease causes anorexia. However, some U.S. doctors said they weren't surprised by the findings. "I think a lot of us are aware there is a possibility of [celiac] patients developing an eating disorder," said Dr. Hilary Jericho, an assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Chicago's School of Medicine. Jericho specializes in treating celiac disease. She ... Read more

Related support groups: Anorexia, Celiac Disease, Anorexia nervosa

Downside to Gluten-Free Diets: Diabetes Risk?

Posted 9 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 9, 2017 – "Gluten-free" may be the latest diet fad, but new research casts some doubt on its presumed health benefits. In a large study of U.S. health professionals, scientists found that those with the least gluten in their diets actually had a slightly higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes over a few decades. The findings do not prove that a low-gluten diet somehow contributes to diabetes. But the study raises questions about the long-term benefits of avoiding gluten, which many people assume to be a healthy move. Some people – namely, those with the digestive disorder celiac disease – do have to shun gluten, said lead researcher Geng Zong. But there is little research on whether other people stand to gain from going gluten-free, said Zong. He is a research fellow in nutrition at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, in Boston. That's a big evidence gap, ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Celiac Disease, Diabetes Mellitus, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance

Some Health Fads May Not Be All That Healthy

Posted 27 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 27, 2017 – Juicing may be a popular health fad, but evidence suggests it could actually be detrimental to a good diet. The same goes for coconut oil, which is loaded with saturated fat but has emerged as another dietary craze in the United States. And a gluten-free diet likely has little positive health benefit for people who do not have gluten sensitivity or celiac disease. These conclusions are part of a new review of the latest scientific evidence on food and nutrition that was conducted to shed some light on the latest diet fads. "There is widespread confusion in terms of nutrition. Every day someone says something is good, and then the next day they say it's bad," said review lead author Dr. Andrew Freeman, co-chair of the American College of Cardiology's Lifestyle and Nutrition Work Group. "Our purpose was to do our best to give clinicians the tools they need to help ... Read more

Related support groups: Vitamins, Vitamin D, Multivitamin, Niacin, Folic Acid, Deplin, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation and Deficiency, Multivitamin With Minerals, Vitamin B12, Niaspan, Celiac Disease, Vitamin C, Vitamin D3, A-25, Metanx, D3, Central, Centrum Multivitamins, Multivitamin, Prenatal, Multivitamin With Iron

Possible Drawback to Gluten-Free: Toxic Metals

Posted 16 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 16, 2017 – America's love affair with gluten-free foods may come at a cost: greater intake of the toxic metals arsenic and mercury, a new study contends. "These results indicate that there could be unintended consequences of eating a gluten-free diet," said study author Maria Argos of the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). Gluten-free products often contain rice flour as a substitute for wheat, rye and barley. And rice is known to accumulate arsenic and mercury from fertilizers, soil and water, said Argos, an assistant professor of epidemiology in the School of Public Health. For the study, the researchers analyzed U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data from thousands of Americans, aged 6 to 80. The investigators identified 73 people who said they ate a gluten-free diet. Compared to other survey participants, those who ate gluten-free diets had ... Read more

Related support groups: Celiac Disease, Poisoning, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Trisenox, Mercury Poisoning, Arsenic Trioxide

Study Ties Inflammation, Gut Bacteria to Type 1 Diabetes

Posted 20 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 19, 2017 – People with type 1 diabetes show changes in their digestive system that aren't seen in people who don't have the autoimmune disease, a new Italian study finds. Those changes include different gut bacteria and inflammation in the small intestine. The differences may play a role in the development of type 1 diabetes, the researchers said. "For years, we have looked for the cause of type 1 diabetes in the pancreas. Perhaps, we looked in the wrong place and there is the possibility that the intestines play a key role in the development of the disease," said study senior author Dr. Piemonti Lorenzo. He is deputy director of the San Raffaele Diabetes Research Institute in Milan. However, Lorenzo said it isn't possible to "draw definitive conclusions" about whether these intestinal changes can cause the autoimmune attack that leads to type 1 diabetes. In type 1 ... Read more

Related support groups: Insulin, Lantus, Diabetes, Type 1, Novolog, Humalog, Levemir, Lantus Solostar, Celiac Disease, Novolin R, Novolin N, Humulin N, Lantus Solostar Pen, Diabetes Mellitus, Toujeo, NovoLog FlexPen, Tresiba, Humulin R, Humalog KwikPen, Humalog Pen, Insulin Glargine

Health Tip: Managing Celiac Disease

Posted 13 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Avoiding gluten is the most important factor in managing celiac disease, but more may be required. Here are suggestions from the Mayo Clinic: Check food labels carefully and to avoid all foods and care products that contain gluten. Some types of lipstick and toothpaste include gluten. Since you're avoiding certain foods, ask your doctor if you may need nutritional supplements. See your doctor regularly for checkups and tests, including a possible endoscopy if you have current symptoms. Work with a registered dietitian to make sure you're getting the right nutrients. Read more

Related support groups: Celiac Disease

Early Introduction of Eggs, Peanuts May Cut Kids' Allergy Risk: Study

Posted 20 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 20, 2016 – Introducing babies to eggs or peanuts early on may help reduce their risk of food allergies, a new analysis finds. Researchers reviewed 146 previous studies that examined when babies were given foods that often trigger reactions, as well as their risk of food allergies or autoimmune diseases. They discovered that the timing of food introduction may affect allergy risk, but they found no similar link for autoimmune disease. The researchers reported with "moderate certainty" that babies who were given eggs when they were 4 months to 6 months old had a lower egg allergy risk. And children given peanuts between 4 months and 11 months of age had a lower peanut allergy risk than those who were older. The study, published Sept. 20 in the Journal of the American Medical Association, said early introduction could head off 24 cases of egg allergy per 1,000 people and 18 ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Angioedema, Celiac Disease, Anaphylaxis, Nasal Polyps, Nasal Polyps - Prevention, Oral Allergy Syndrome

Number of Americans on Gluten-Free Diet Tripled in 5 Years

Posted 6 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 6, 2016 – Gluten-free diets seem to be the latest fad, yet the number of people being diagnosed with celiac disease hasn't budged, new research shows. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder, in which foods containing gluten trigger the immune system to attack and damage the small intestine, according to the Celiac Disease Foundation. Gluten is a protein found naturally in grains like wheat, barley and rye. People with celiac disease have no choice but to avoid gluten in their diet. If they don't, their small intestine is damaged every time they eat something with gluten. Gluten-free diets also appear to have become a trendy way to address any sort of gastrointestinal problem, said lead author Dr. Hyun-seok Kim, an internal medicine resident at the Rutgers New Jersey Medical School in Newark, N.J. "People may have a gluten sensitivity or non-specific gastrointestinal ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Gastrointestinal Disorders, Celiac Disease

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