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Cardiovascular Risk Reduction News

Mideast Violence Erasing Decades of Health Gains

Posted 1 day 15 hours ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 25, 2016 – The 2010 Arab uprising and more recent Mideast wars have harmed health and shortened life expectancy in many countries across the eastern Mediterranean, a new study shows. Researchers warn that strife in Syria, Yemen, Libya, Tunisia and Egypt, in particular, could reverse two decades of health gains and affect the region for years to come. They found that between 2010 and 2013, life expectancy fell six years in Syria and by roughly three months in Yemen, Tunisia and Egypt. "Life expectancy decline is traditionally regarded as a sign that the health and social systems are failing," said study leader Ali Mokdad, a professor of global health at the University of Washington. "The fact that this is happening in several countries indicates there is an immediate need to invest in health care systems," Mokdad said. In Syria, average life expectancy for men declined ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

Serious Heart Problem a Family Matter

Posted 1 day 15 hours ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 25, 2016 – A potentially deadly heart problem can run in families and occur at similar ages, a new study suggests. An aortic dissection is a sudden tear in one of the body's main arteries. "Family history is very important and is one factor in our 'guilt by association paradigm' for identifying patients at risk," said study co-author Dr. John Elefteriades, of the Aortic Institute at Yale-New Haven Hospital in Connecticut. Researchers reviewed the family histories of 90 people treated for an aortic dissection. Among those cases, more than half of those within the same families occurred within a 10-year age span. The risk increased within certain age groups, the researchers found. For instance, when they looked at patients whose aortic dissection occurred between ages 30 and 49, they found that 71 percent of other family members' dissections occurred in that age range. ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

Health Tip: Explaining Circuit Training

Posted 2 days 15 hours ago by Drugs.com

-- Circuit training offers a fast-paced exercise regimen that moves quickly between different stations designed to work different areas of your body. The American Council on Exercise explains why it's a good choice: Circuit training combines both cardiovascular and strengthening exercises in one workout. Because there are so many different exercises, it helps prevent boredom. It burns a high amount of calories. You can mix and match exercises to create a nearly endless variation. It allows for flexibility and creativity in designing your workout. Read more

Related support groups: Weight Loss, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

Cancer on Course to Become Top Killer of Americans

Posted 2 days 15 hours ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 24, 2016 – Cancer is on track to become the leading cause of death in the United States, closing in on heart disease as America's number one killer, a new government study shows. Heart disease has consistently been the leading cause of death for decades, and remained so in 2014, according to a report from the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But the gap between heart disease and the second-leading cause of death, cancer, has been narrowing since 1968, the researchers said. Cancer actually surpassed heart disease as the leading cause of death for 22 states in 2014, the study found. Back in 2000, Alaska and Minnesota were the only two states where cancer killed more people than heart disease. In addition, cancer is now the leading cause of death for a number of minority groups, including Hispanics, Asians ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Cancer, Heart Disease, Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease

Unhappy at Work in Your 20s, Unhealthy in Your 40s?

Posted 5 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 22, 2016 – Millennials, take heed: Job dissatisfaction in your 20s or 30s can undermine your health by mid-life, new research suggests. But really rewarding work may pay health dividends. "Those who are, on average, very satisfied versus satisfied tend to have better health in their 40s," said study lead author Jonathan Dirlam. He is a doctoral candidate in the department of sociology at Ohio State University. By their 40s, disenchanted workers had worse mental health. They were more likely to suffer from routine sleep trouble and anxiety compared with satisfied or increasingly satisfied participants, the study found. Seth Kaplan, an associate professor in industrial/organizational psychology at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va., said, "We know that there are some major job-related factors that contribute to poor psychological health." According to Kaplan, who wasn't ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Sleep Disorders, Prozac, Major Depressive Disorder, Dysthymia, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

No More Than 6 Teaspoons of Added Sugars a Day for Kids

Posted 5 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 22, 2016 – Children and teens should consume less than six teaspoons of added sugars a day, a new American Heart Association statement advises. "Our target recommendation is the same for all children between the ages of 2 and 18, to keep it simple for parents and public health advocates," statement lead author Dr. Miriam Vos said in a heart association news release. Added sugars are any sugars, including table sugar, fructose and honey, used in processing and preparing foods or beverages, added to foods at the table, or eaten separately. "For most children, eating no more than six teaspoons of added sugars per day is a healthy and achievable target," Vos explained. She is a nutrition scientist and associate professor of pediatrics at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta. The statement also said children younger than 2 years should not consume foods or beverages ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Obesity, Weight Loss, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

Family Trumps Friends in Extending Seniors' Lives

Posted 6 days ago by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Aug. 21, 2016 – Among older folks, close family relationships appear more important than dear friends in extending life, a new study finds. Older adults who were extremely close with family other than spouses had about a 6 percent risk of dying within the next five years, compared with about 14 percent among those who said they were not close to their family, the researchers discovered. "Social relationships really do matter," said lead researcher James Iveniuk, a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Toronto School of Public Health. But family relationships seem more vital than friendships. "You can be close to your friends, but it didn't have a big effect, but if you were not close to your family, you were at greater risk of dying," he said. In particular, people not close to their family had a greater risk of suffering a heart attack or stroke, Iveniuk said. Family ... Read more

Related support groups: Mild Cognitive Impairment, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

'Business Diet' a Bad Deal for the Heart

Posted 8 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 19, 2016 – The typical "social business diet" – heavy on red meats, sweet drinks, processed snacks and booze – takes a toll on the heart, a new study finds. In the go-go world of business meetings and nonstop travel, healthy home-cooked meals often give way to unhealthy fare consumed on the road. This ups the risk for atherosclerosis, a slow but steady clogging of the arteries, the researchers say. "We found that more than other diets, the 'social business eating pattern' specifically raises the risk for developing atherosclerosis disease," said study author Dr. Valentin Fuster. He's a professor of cardiology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. With its emphasis on eating out, snacking on the run and excessive alcohol consumption, this style of eating is even worse than the so-called Western diet, the researchers found. "This business diet is ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

Heart Health May Hinge on Easy Access to Fresh Food

Posted 11 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 16, 2016 – People who can't shop for fresh food close to home are more likely to have early signs of heart disease, a new study finds. Researchers examined data from nearly 6,000 adults who had an initial heart CT scan and several follow-up scans over 12 years. The availability of fresh food near their homes was key to the condition of their arteries, according to the study published Aug. 15 in the journal Circulation. "We found that healthy food stores within one mile of their home was the only significant factor that reduced or slowed the progression of calcium buildup in coronary arteries," co-lead author Ella August said in a journal news release. She is a clinical assistant professor of epidemiology at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. "Our results point to a need for greater awareness of the potential health threat posed by the scarcity of healthy grocery ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease

How Long Will You Live? Look to Your Parents

Posted 12 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 15, 2016 – Children of long-lived parents are less likely than others to die from heart disease in their 70s, new British research suggests. "We found that for each parent that lived beyond 70 years of age, the participants had a 20 percent lower chance of dying from heart disease," said study co-author Luke Pilling, a research fellow in epidemiology and public health at the University of Exeter Medical School. Specifically, the children of longer-lived parents had lower rates of vascular disease, heart failure, stroke, high blood pressure and high cholesterol, the study found. The findings aren't an excuse to turn into a binge-eating couch potato if your mother and father reached their 80s or 90s. Nor are they a sign that those whose parents died early should just give up. On the contrary, your decisions about your health can reverse trends toward the illnesses ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, High Cholesterol, Hypertriglyceridemia, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Hypertensive Emergency, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Too Many Public Defibrillators Out of Reach When Needed

Posted 12 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 15, 2016 – Automated external defibrillators (AEDs) placed in public spaces can save the lives of people in cardiac arrest. However, a new Canadian study finds too many of the devices are in buildings that aren't always open, so bystanders can't get them when needed. The study, "serves as a vivid reminder that 24/7/365 access to AEDs is as important as their widespread placement," said one specialist who reviewed the findings, Dr. Howard Levite. He directs cardiology at Staten Island University Hospital in New York City. More AEDs in public spaces, along with timely access, is imperative, he said, because "the potential to improve survival in cardiac arrest is an opportunity that cannot be ignored." Cardiac arrest differs from a heart attack, and occurs when the heart abruptly stops beating. According to the American College of Cardiology (ACC), over 400,000 cases of ... Read more

Related support groups: Atrial Fibrillation, Heart Attack, Arrhythmia, Cardiac Arrhythmia, Myocardial Infarction, Ventricular Tachycardia, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Bradyarrhythmia, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Heart Block, Ventricular Arrhythmia, AV Heart Block, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome

Exercise Not an 'Antidote' to Too Much Sitting, Heart Experts Say

Posted 12 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 15, 2016 – Even if you exercise regularly, too much sitting can still be bad for your heart, a leading cardiologists' group warns. The American Heart Association (AHA) also says that too many people are spending far too much time on chairs and sofas, period. "Based on existing evidence, we found that U.S. adults are sedentary for about six to eight hours a day," said Deborah Rohm Young, chair of the AHA panel that wrote the new advisory. The problem only gets worse with age. "Adults 60 years and older spend between 8.5 to 9.6 hours a day in sedentary time," Young said in an AHA news release. She directs behavioral research at Kaiser Permanente Southern California. One heart specialist said the new stance is justified. "Don't be a 'sitting duck for cardiovascular disease' – move more, sit less," said Dr. Barbara George, director of the Center for Cardiovascular Lifestyle ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Diabetes Mellitus, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

Cancer Now Leading Killer in 12 European Nations

Posted 12 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 15, 2016 – Cancer has overtaken heart disease and stroke as the leading cause of death in 12 European countries, a new study reports. However, cardiovascular disease (heart disease and stroke) is still the leading cause of death worldwide, killing more than 17 million people a year, according to the study. In the 53 countries defined as the European region by the World Health Organization, heart disease killed more than 4 million people in 2016. Those deaths accounted for 45 percent of all deaths in those nations. Cancer accounted for less than half the number of deaths from heart disease in Europe as a whole, researchers said. However, success in preventing and treating heart disease seems to have led to large declines in heart disease deaths in a number of countries. Cancer now kills more men than heart disease in these 12 countries: Belgium, Denmark, France, Israel, ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Heart Disease, Breast Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

U.S. Kids Don't Make the Grade on Heart Health

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 11, 2016 – Most American children fall short of ideal heart health, a new American Heart Association scientific statement says. An analysis of 2007-08 federal government survey results found that about 91 percent of youngsters did not have healthy diets. Those between the ages of 2 and 19 get most of their calories from simple carbohydrates such as sugary drinks and desserts. "A primary reason for so few children having ideal cardiovascular health is poor nutrition," statement author Dr. Julia Steinberger said in an association news release. "Children are eating high-calorie, low-nutrition foods and not eating enough healthy foods, such as fruits, vegetables, whole-grains, fish and other foods strongly associated with good heart health and a healthy body weight." Lack of physical activity is another concern. Among 6- to 11-year-olds, half of boys and about a third of ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Obesity, Hypertension, Heart Disease, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease

Health Tip: Protect Yourself From Hardened Arteries

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

-- Plaque that builds up in arteries reduces blood flow and makes arteries more rigid – a condition known as atherosclerosis. The National Heart Lung and Blood Institute suggests these preventive tips: Adopt a heart-healthy diet that's rich in fruit, vegetables, low-fat dairy, whole grains and lean proteins. Avoid foods high in fat, sugar and salt. Get plenty of regular exercise. Don't smoke. If you have excess weight, find a program that's healthy and works for you to help you shed pounds. Find out your family medical history, and tell your doctor if you have relatives with atherosclerosis. Read more

Related support groups: Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

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