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Breast Cancer, Prevention News

Related terms: Prevention of Breast Cancer

Could Breast Milk Tests Replace Mammograms?

Posted 3 days ago by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, April 22, 2017 – Breast-milk analysis may someday offer an alternative to mammograms for women in their childbearing years, new research suggests. Because mammography isn't well-suited to the dense breasts of younger women, scientists have begun looking for other viable breast-cancer screening tools. In a preliminary study, researchers report promising results with a new technique: evaluating breast milk for signs of cancer. "We have found alterations in protein expression in the breast milk of women with breast cancer compared to women without breast cancer," said study first author Roshanak Aslebagh. "Those proteins might be a potential biomarker of breast cancer," said Aslebagh, a doctoral candidate at Clarkson University in Potsdam, N.Y. A "biomarker" can be an indicator of a disease process, a normal biological process or responses to medication. In this case, it ... Read more

Related support groups: Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Diagnosis and Investigation

More Asian-American Women Getting Breast Cancer

Posted 13 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, April 14, 2017 – Breast cancer rates among Asian-Americans are steadily rising in contrast to other racial/ethnic groups, a new study suggests. Researchers from the Cancer Prevention Institute of California reviewed data from 1988 to 2013 on breast cancer among women in California from seven Asian ethnic groups. These included Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, Filipinos, Vietnamese, South Asians (Asian Indians and Pakistanis), and Southeast Asians (Cambodians, Laotians, Hmong, Thai). During the study period, all of these groups – except Japanese women – had an overall increase in breast cancer incidence. The largest increases were among Koreans, South Asians and Southeast Asians, the study authors said. "These patterns warrant additional attention to public health prioritization to target disparities in access to care, as well as further research in identifying relevant breast ... Read more

Related support groups: Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Breast Cancer, Prevention

Misunderstood Gene Tests May Lead to Unnecessary Mastectomies

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 12, 2017 – Close to half of breast cancer patients who chose to have a double mastectomy after genetic testing didn't actually have the gene mutations known to raise the risk of additional cancers, a new survey found. "That was a bit surprising, because we wouldn't typically expect that surgery to be conducted for women if they don't have a risk-causing gene mutation," said lead researcher Dr. Allison Kurian. She is an associate professor of medicine, health research and policy at Stanford University. The finding suggests that many women and their doctors aren't interpreting the results of genetic testing properly, she added. There are known genetic mutations that increase future risk of cancer, the most notorious of which are BRCA 1 and 2. But genetic tests also often detect mutations of uncertain significance, Kurian explained. The genes are not normal, but the ... Read more

Related support groups: Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Breast Cancer - Palliative, Diagnosis and Investigation, Body Imaging

Mammogram Guidelines Have Changed, But Are Doctors Listening?

Posted 18 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 10, 2017 – Four of five doctors still recommend annual mammograms for women in their early 40s, despite guideline changes that have pushed back the age for yearly breast cancer screening, a new survey shows. Overall, 81 percent of physicians surveyed said they suggest annual mammograms for women aged 40 to 44, while more than two-thirds recommend regular mammograms for women aged 75 or older. "Gynecologists were, in general, more likely to recommend routine mammograms," added lead researcher Dr. Archana Radhakrishnan, an internist with Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. These practices run counter to guidelines issued by the American Cancer Society, which recommends annual screening starting at 45 and screening every other year from age 55 onward, researchers said in background notes. The doctors also are ignoring the advice of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force ... Read more

Related support groups: Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Breast Cancer - Palliative, Body Imaging

Can Smog Raise Breast Cancer Risk?

Posted 7 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 6, 2017 – Women who live where the air is thick with pollutants may be more likely to have dense breasts, a known risk factor for breast cancer, new research suggests. "It appears that women who have dense breasts have a 20 percent greater likelihood of having been exposed to smog," said study author Dr. Lusine Yaghjyan, an assistant professor of epidemiology at the University of Florida. On the other hand, women with less-dense breasts were 12 percent less likely to have been exposed to high levels of the fine particles in air pollution that can infiltrate the lungs, she added. Although other research has revealed a similar link, Yaghjyan noted this latest study is the largest to date on the topic. As to why the pollution may be linked to more dense breast tissue, "it appears some of the chemicals that might be in those fine particles [in air pollution] might have ... Read more

Related support groups: Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Respiratory Tract Disease

Breast Cancer 'Immunotherapy' Helps Some With Tough-to-Treat Disease

Posted 3 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 3, 2017 – Women with a particularly aggressive form of breast cancer who responded to an new immune-focused drug gained a significant survival benefit, a new study shows. The patients all had what's known as advanced, "triple-negative" breast cancers. "Triple-negative breast cancer is an aggressive subtype of breast cancer often affecting younger women and, unfortunately, the current treatment options for metastatic disease remain limited," explained Dr. Peter Schmid. He directs the Breast Centre at St. Bartholomew's Hospital and Barts Cancer Institute in London, England. However, oncologists also stressed that many women who took the new drug, called Tecentriq (atezolizumab), failed to respond. The results of this early, phase 1 trial were to be presented Monday at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Cancer Research (AACR), in Washington, D.C. The trial ... Read more

Related support groups: Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Tecentriq, Atezolizumab

Survival Continues to Improve for Most Cancers

Posted 31 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 31, 2017 – Overall cancer death rates in the United States continue to fall, but racial gaps persist, a new report says. Death rates fell between 2010 and 2014 for 11 of the 16 most common cancers in men and for 13 of the most common types in women, including lung, colon, prostate and breast cancers. However, death rates rose for cancers of the liver, pancreas and brain in men and for the liver and uterus in women. And improvements in cancer survival weren't equal for all Americans. "While this report found that five-year survival for most types of cancer improved among both blacks and whites over the past several decades, racial disparities for many common cancers have persisted, and they may have increased for prostate cancer and female breast cancer," said Dr. Lynne Penberthy. She's associate director of the U.S. National Cancer Institute's Surveillance Research ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Lung Cancer, Renal Cell Carcinoma, Colorectal Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Brain Tumor, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Pancreatic Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, Osteosarcoma, Endometrial Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Bladder Cancer, Cervical Cancer, Melanoma - Metastatic

Preventive Mastectomy Rates Vary by State

Posted 29 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 29, 2017 – In certain areas of the United States, more women diagnosed with early stage breast cancer are choosing to have the unaffected breast removed, new research finds. The study also found that younger women are especially likely to have the second breast removed. Nearly half of women under age 45 diagnosed with early breast cancer in five states opted for the procedure, said the study's senior author, Dr. Ahmedin Jemal. He's vice president of the American Cancer Society's Surveillance and Health Services Research Program. The five states are Colorado, Iowa, Missouri, Nebraska and South Dakota. The study included records from 1.2 million women from 45 states and Washington, D.C. All patients were 20 and older. All had been diagnosed with early stage breast cancer in one breast and were treated with surgery between 2004 and 2012. Between those years, the ... Read more

Related support groups: Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Breast Cancer - Palliative, Diagnosis and Investigation, Vascular Surgery

Many Women Who Get Breast Cancer Gene Test Don't Need It

Posted 28 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 28, 2017 – An increasing number of American women who don't have breast or ovarian cancer are being tested for BRCA and BRCA2 gene mutations associated with those diseases, a new study shows. Mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes significantly increase a woman's risk of breast cancer. These mutations are linked to 5 percent to 10 percent of all breast cancer and about 15 percent of ovarian cancers, the U.S. National Cancer Institute says. The new study found that more than 60 percent of BRCA tests are done on women without breast or ovarian cancer. In 2004, that number was just 24 percent. This increase is likely due to increased marketing of BRCA testing. This may lead women at low risk for BRCA mutations to self-refer for testing, the researchers said. While the number of low-risk women being tested has increased, BRCA testing is being underused by at-risk women, the ... Read more

Related support groups: Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Ovarian Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Diagnosis and Investigation

High Doses of Vitamin D Fail to Cut Cancer Risk, Study Finds

Posted 28 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 28, 2017 – High doses of vitamin D supplements may not lower older women's risk of developing cancer, a new clinical trial finds. Many studies have hinted that vitamin D might help ward off cancer. Some, for example, have found that people with higher blood levels of the vitamin have lower rates of certain cancers, including colon and breast cancers. In lab experiments, vitamin D has also shown activities that might slow the growth of cancer – such as, promoting the death of abnormal cells. But those types of studies cannot prove that taking vitamin D actually causes cancer risk to drop, explained Dr. JoAnn Manson, of Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston. That, Manson said, takes clinical trials that test vitamin D against an inactive placebo. That's exactly what the new study did, but it found no significant benefit. The trial involved ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Vitamin D Deficiency, Colorectal Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Caltrate 600 with D, Citracal + D, Calcium/Vitamin D, Citracal Petites, Oysco 500 with D, Citracal Creamy Bites, Calcet, Oyster Shell Calcium, Calcarb with D, Calcium 600 D, Dical-D, Caltrate Colon Health, Oysco D with Calcium, Oyster Shell Calcium with Vitamin D, O-Cal-D

Is Radiation Therapy Overused in Breast Cancer Care?

Posted 14 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 14, 2017 – More than half of older American women with early breast cancer may get more radiation therapy than needed, which significantly boosts medical costs, a new study indicates. Analyzing 2011 data on breast cancer patients, researchers estimated $164 million could have been saved by ordering a shorter radiation course. "Women who were eligible for shorter radiation courses or omission of radiation were still often receiving longer and more costly radiation courses," said study leader Dr. Rachel Greenup. She's an assistant professor of surgery at Duke University Medical Center Cancer Institute in Durham, N.C. However, Greenup and other experts said the study results might not be applicable to today because more women are receiving shorter courses of radiation than in 2011. For the study, Greenup's team used data on 43,000 breast cancer patients age 50 and older ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Tamoxifen, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Breast Cancer - Palliative, Nausea/Vomiting - Radiation Induced, History - Radiation Therapy, Tamoxifen Hexal, Soltamox, Tamone, Tamoxen, Genox, Nolvadex D, Tamofen, Tamosin, Emblon, Nolvadex

Soy Safe, Even Protective, for Breast Cancer Survivors

Posted 7 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 7, 2017 – The pros and cons of soy for breast cancer patients have been debated for years. Now, research involving more than 6,200 breast cancer survivors finds that those who ate the most soy had a lower risk of death from all causes during the nearly 10-year follow-up period. "We didn't find any harmful effects of women diagnosed with breast cancer consuming soy in terms of mortality," said study leader Dr. Fang Fang Zhang. She's an assistant professor of epidemiology at Tufts University's Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy in Boston. "Overall, consuming higher levels of soy is associated with a 21 percent reduction in the risk of death compared to women who consumed soy at a lower level," she said. Concerns around soy's "risk/benefit" profile have arisen because the food has estrogen-like compounds called isoflavones. That's important, experts says, ... Read more

Related support groups: Hot Flashes, Breast Cancer, Menopausal Disorders, Postmenopausal Symptoms, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Soy, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Breast Cancer - Palliative

Bad Diet in Youth Might Raise Risk of Early Breast Cancer

Posted 2 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 2, 2017 – A poor diet while young may do more than just make it tough to fit into a pair of jeans: New research suggests it might also raise a younger woman's risk for breast cancer. "A diet high in sugar, refined carbohydrates, and red and processed meat makes it more likely that you may experience early onset breast cancer," said study senior author Karin Michels. She is chair of epidemiology at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, in Los Angeles. An unhealthy diet appeared to increase that risk by more than one-third, but the findings can't prove cause-and-effect, Michels said. "We are talking about a link or association," she noted. The study tracked data from more than 45,000 women enrolled in the Nurses' Health Study II. All of the women completed food frequency questionnaires about their teen and early adult diets, and were followed up for 22 years. The ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Breast Cancer, Menopausal Disorders, Postmenopausal Symptoms, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Perimenopausal Symptoms, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Breast Cancer - Palliative, Diagnosis and Investigation

Diagnostic Mammograms Find More Cancers, and More False-Positives

Posted 28 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 28, 2017 – Thanks to high-tech imaging, mammograms ordered when breast cancer is suspected are catching more tumors – but the percentage of false alarms is up, too, a new study finds. These so-called diagnostic mammograms are performed because of certain symptoms or other suspicious findings. They are not the same as routine screening mammograms, said the study's lead author, Brian Sprague. The new study found the breast cancer detection rate rose to nearly 35 per 1,000 diagnostic mammograms from 2007 to 2013. That's up from 25 per 1,000 noted in a 2005 report from the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium. This higher detection rate probably reflects the switch from film to digital technology, which permits identification of smaller lesions, said Sprague. He is associate professor of surgery at the University of Vermont College of Medicine. "About 99 percent" of exams ... Read more

Related support groups: Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Diagnosis and Investigation, Body Imaging

10 Daily Servings of Fruits, Veggies a Recipe for Longevity

Posted 23 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 23, 2017 – If you want to add years to your life, 10 daily servings of fruits and vegetables may be the best recipe you can follow, a new analysis suggests. The benefits appear to come through lower rates of heart attack, stroke, cancer and early death. And if everyone found a way to get 10 daily servings of produce, 7.8 million premature deaths would be avoided each year worldwide, the British researchers estimated. Exactly how much in the way of fruits and vegetables is that? Anywhere from 10 small bananas or apples to 30 tablespoons of cooked spinach, peas, broccoli or cauliflower – or roughly 800 grams of produce, the researchers said. At least five servings (400 grams) of fruits and vegetables each day is what is currently recommended by many health agencies. "Although five portions of fruit and vegetables is good, 10 a day is even better," said study author ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Cancer, Weight Loss, Transient Ischemic Attack, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Breast Cancer, Prevention

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