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Related terms: Brain Cancer, Brain Tumor, metastatic, Cancer, Brain, Intracranial Tumors

FDA Approves Gleolan (aminolevulinic acid hydrochloride) as an Optical Imaging Agent in Patients with Gliomas

Posted 6 days ago by Drugs.com

June 6, 2017 - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Gleolan [aminolevulinic acid hydrochloride (ALA HCl)] as an optical imaging agent indicated in patients with gliomas (suspected World Health Organization Grades III or IV on preoperative imaging) as an adjunct for the visualization of malignant tissue during surgery. The approved recommended reconstituted oral dose of Gleolan is 20 mg/kg administered 3 hours (range 2 to 4 hours) prior to induction of anesthesia. During neurosurgery, Gleolan is used with an operating microscope adapted with a blue emitting light source and filters for excitation light of wavelength 375 to 440 nm, and observation at wavelengths of 620 to 710 nm. Due to the risk of phototoxic reactions, do not administer phototoxic drugs for 24 hours during the perioperative period. Reduce exposure to sunlight or room lights for 24 hours ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Brain Tumor, Diagnosis and Investigation, Gleolan, Aminolevulinic Acid

'Electric Cap' Might Help Fight a Deadly Brain Tumor

Posted 3 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 3, 2017 – A cap that zaps tumors with electrical currents may boost survival in patients with a deadly brain cancer, new research suggests. The device is worn on the head and exposes glioblastoma cells to a rapidly alternating sequence of low-intensity electrical frequencies. This interrupts cancer cells' ability to function, the researchers said. According to study author Dr. Roger Stupp, a professor of neurological surgery at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, the cap is "an entirely different way to treat cancer. "Our results demonstrate a proof-of-concept that this treatment modality actually works, and can prevent tumor cells from growing and dividing," he added. "And it does increase the survival rate at two years, three years, and even at five years, in a substantial amount," said Stupp, who noted that the cap is "the first treatment ... Read more

Related support groups: Brain Tumor, Glioblastoma Multiforme

Survival Continues to Improve for Most Cancers

Posted 31 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 31, 2017 – Overall cancer death rates in the United States continue to fall, but racial gaps persist, a new report says. Death rates fell between 2010 and 2014 for 11 of the 16 most common cancers in men and for 13 of the most common types in women, including lung, colon, prostate and breast cancers. However, death rates rose for cancers of the liver, pancreas and brain in men and for the liver and uterus in women. And improvements in cancer survival weren't equal for all Americans. "While this report found that five-year survival for most types of cancer improved among both blacks and whites over the past several decades, racial disparities for many common cancers have persisted, and they may have increased for prostate cancer and female breast cancer," said Dr. Lynne Penberthy. She's associate director of the U.S. National Cancer Institute's Surveillance Research ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Renal Cell Carcinoma, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Brain Tumor, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, Pancreatic Cancer, Osteosarcoma, Endometrial Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer, Bladder Cancer, Cervical Cancer, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Melanoma - Metastatic

Seniors With Brain Cancer May Have Better Treatment Option

Posted 15 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 15, 2017 – Combined chemotherapy and radiation treatment appears to extend the lives of older patients with brain cancer, new research finds. The study involved more than 560 older patients with glioblastoma, the most common malignant brain cancer in adults. The average age of disease onset is 65 and there is no cure, according to the study. On average, patients who received the chemotherapy pill temozolomide plus a short course of radiation therapy survived two months longer than those who underwent radiation alone, an international team of researchers found. And, many patients in the combination treatment group survived nearly 14 months – about twice that compared to those who received radiation alone, the researchers reported. "Everyone benefited to a varying degree," said co-principal investigator Dr. Normand Laperriere. "There has been no clear standard of care ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Brain Tumor, Glioblastoma Multiforme, Temodar, Diagnosis and Investigation, Malignant Glioma, Temozolomide

Study Casts Doubt on a Brain Cancer's Link to Herpes

Posted 8 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 7, 2017 – There's no link between a common type of herpes virus and aggressive brain cancers, according to a new study that refutes earlier reports. Johns Hopkins researchers analyzed tumor tissue from 125 patients with aggressive brain cancers called gliomas. Ninety-nine of the samples were from adults. Twenty-six were from children. The researchers found no evidence of cytomegalovirus (CMV), a type of herpes virus, in the tumor tissue. Further studies are needed to rule out any role for CMV in these brain cancers. But the new findings suggest little likelihood of any connection, the researchers said. "We have found no evidence of CMV in these tissues, and if there is no virus, targeting that virus to affect cancer using antiviral drugs or tailored vaccines doesn't make biological sense," said Dr. Angelo De Marzo, a professor of pathology, oncology and urology at Johns ... Read more

Related support groups: Brain Tumor, Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Infection, Malignant Glioma

Cancer Survivors Gain From Web-Based Health Care

Posted 10 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Feb. 10, 2017 – Online- and phone-based health care offers a number of benefits for cancer survivors, British researchers report. The new study looked at previous research on cancer survivors' experiences with online and phone health contacts – what the researchers call telehealth. The review found that patients liked the flexibility and convenience of this method of staying in touch with their care providers because they could do so in a familiar, comfortable setting and with minimum disruption to their lives. The perceived anonymity of telehealth reduced patients' sense of vulnerability and some said they were more comfortable raising concerns in this setting than in face-to-face appointments. Negative aspects of telehealth mentioned by patients included not being able to meet their health care providers in person, while other patients said they couldn't use the service due ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Brain Tumor, Skin Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer, Bladder Cancer, Cervical Cancer, Stomach Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Testicular Cancer, Breast Cancer - Palliative, Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome, Wilms' Tumor, Solid Tumors

Chemo Drug May Combat Serious Brain Tumor After All

Posted 22 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 22, 2016 – Some patients with a deadly brain tumor may respond to drugs previously believed to be ineffective against the cancer, a new study says. The findings highlight the importance of properly categorizing glioblastoma tumors in order to best tailor treatment to each patient, according to the researchers. Glioblastoma tumors are diagnosed in about 12,000 people in the United States each year. Half of patients with this type of tumor die within 15 months of diagnosis, the researchers said. There was hope that lives could be extended with a class of chemotherapy drugs called anti-angiogenic compounds. These drugs were designed to block the growth of new blood vessels in the tumor in an attempt to starve the tumor of oxygen and nutrients. But recently published findings from two large clinical trials concluded that an anti-angiogenic drug called bevacizumab did not ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Brain Tumor, Avastin, Glioblastoma Multiforme, Bevacizumab

Cancer Patients in Poorer Countries Often Go Without Radiation

Posted 2 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 29, 2016 – Many cancer patients in low- and middle-income nations who would benefit from radiation treatment don't receive it, a new study finds. "In Ghana and the Philippines, for example, about eight in 10 cancer patients who need radiation therapy will not receive needed treatment," said study co-author Dr. Elena Fidarova, a researcher at the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna, Austria. She and her colleagues analyzed data from nine nations: Costa Rica, Ghana, Malaysia, the Philippines, Romania, Serbia, Slovenia, Tunisia and Uruguay. Overall, about five out of 10 cancer patients in these countries require radiation therapy to shrink tumors and kill cancer cells. But up to half of them do not have access to it, the researchers found. In individual nations, the rates of patients who can benefit from radiation therapy but do not receive it ranged from 18 to 82 ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Lung Cancer, Brain Tumor, Bladder Cancer, History - Radiation Therapy

Childhood Cancer Death Rates Continue to Fall: CDC

Posted 16 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 16, 2016 – The number of U.S. children who die from cancer has fallen 20 percent since 1999, and leukemia is no longer the top killer, a new federal government report shows. The decline continues a trend that began back in the 1970s, experts said. What's new is that leukemia – the most common type of childhood cancer – is no longer the leading cause of cancer deaths. Survival among children with leukemia has improved to the degree that brain cancer now tops the list. "It had been leukemia for decades, but only recently has there been this switch," said lead researcher Sally Curtin, who is with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). It's not that deaths from childhood brain cancer are rising, according to Curtin. Instead, the rate has remained stubbornly stable, while leukemia deaths keep declining, she ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Hairy Cell Leukemia, Leukemia, Brain Tumor

Strides Made in Treating Childhood Cancer: Report

Posted 11 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 9, 2016 – Significant progress has been made in treating childhood cancers, but more needs to be done to fight tougher cancers and protect the long-term health of survivors, a new report says. In 2016, more than 14,600 children aged 19 and younger will be diagnosed with some form of pediatric cancer, and 1,850 will die, according to the American Cancer Society (ACS), which compiled the report with the Alliance for Childhood Cancer. "The numbers here tell a compelling story," said Katherine Sharpe, senior vice president of patient and caregiver support at the ACS. "We have seen significant progress when it comes to developing effective treatments for a variety of pediatric cancer sites and ultimately saving lives," she said in an ACS news release. "But when we expand our view to look at all pediatric cancers, as well as long-term health and survival, it becomes clear that ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Leukemia, Brain Tumor, Neuroblastoma

Health Insurance Status May Affect Cancer Patients' Survival

Posted 8 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 8, 2016 – Two large studies suggest that surviving certain cancers in America could depend on your health insurance status. Despite improvements in cancer diagnosis and treatment, patients who were uninsured or had Medicaid coverage were more likely to suffer worse outcomes, compared with people who have other forms of health insurance, the studies found. People who were uninsured or relied on Medicaid were diagnosed at a later stage, received sub-optimal treatment and had shorter survival, the findings showed. In the case of testicular cancer, they were at greater risk of death from their disease than patients with other insurance, the researchers found. The findings, published online Aug. 8 in the journal Cancer, add to evidence linking poor outcomes and inadequate health insurance. Dr. Christopher Sweeney, a medical oncologist at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Basal Cell Carcinoma, Brain Tumor, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, Pancreatic Cancer, Cervical Cancer, Melanoma - Metastatic

New Guidelines Issued for Cancer Patients' Post-Treatment Pain

Posted 29 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 29, 2016 – More people are surviving cancer, but many are left with persistent pain after treatment. New guidelines from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) recommend that doctors routinely screen for such pain. The guidelines also advise doctors to consider the use of non-traditional treatments for pain. These include hypnosis, meditation and medical marijuana where it's legal. ASCO also cautioned doctors to assess patients' risk for overuse of opioid painkillers. "Many oncologists and primary care physicians are not trained to recognize or treat long-term pain associated with cancer," guideline panel co-chair Judith Paice said in an ASCO news release. "This guideline will help clinicians identify pain early and develop comprehensive treatment plans, using a broad range of approaches," she said. Advances in cancer diagnosis and treatment have led to a record ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Oxycodone, Hydrocodone, Tramadol, Percocet, Methadone, Cancer, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Chronic Pain, Tylenol, Opana, Ibuprofen, Naproxen

Some Brain Cancer Patients Have Radiation Options: Study

Posted 26 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 26, 2016 – For some brain cancer patients, pinpoint radiation of tumors, known as stereotactic radiosurgery, appears to do less damage to mental abilities than whole brain radiation, a new study finds. Neither technique cures cancer that has spread to the brain, but both temporarily stop tumors from growing and equally extend survival, researchers said. Stereotactic radiosurgery is nonsurgical radiation that precisely targets tumor areas. When just a few lesions exist, this directed type of radiation appears to provide a better quality of life by not altering short-term memory and thinking skills, the study found. "We now have a better understanding of the toxicity of whole brain radiation, and we know that the toxicity of whole brain radiation is worse for patients than the recurrence of their cancer," said lead researcher Dr. Paul Brown, from the department of radiation ... Read more

Related support groups: Brain Tumor, Glioblastoma Multiforme, Malignant Glioma, History - Radiation Therapy, Angioblastoma

Cancer Patients, Doctors Often Disagree About Prognosis

Posted 15 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 15, 2016 – Cancer patients and their doctors often hold different opinions about the patient's chances for survival and how long he or she might live, according to a new study. And, in many cases, patients are unaware there's any misunderstanding. "First, some patients might know the doctor's prognosis estimate but the patient chooses to disagree, often because they believe other sources. And second, some patients think that their doctor agrees with their opinion about prognosis but, in fact, the doctor doesn't," said study co-author Dr. Ronald Epstein. He is a professor of family medicine, psychiatry and oncology at the University of Rochester Medical Center in New York. For the study, researchers asked 236 patients with advanced cancer about their prognosis. The 38 doctors who treated them independently said they would "not have been surprised" if their patients died ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Brain Tumor, Melanoma, Ovarian Cancer, Cervical Cancer, Melanoma - Metastatic, Stomach Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, Testicular Cancer, Solid Tumors

Brain Tumors More Common in Better Educated, Wealthier Folks: Study

Posted 21 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 20, 2016 – People who have a college education, a professional career or a big paycheck may be more likely to be diagnosed with a brain tumor than people who are less well-off or not as educated, a new study reports. Medical data for more than 4.3 million residents of Sweden revealed that people with higher education or better jobs were more likely to be found with one of three types of brain tumor – glioma, meningioma or acoustic neuroma. However, this doesn't necessarily mean that achievement in life increases the risk of brain tumors, said lead researcher Amal Khanolkar, a research associate with University College London's Institute of Child Health. People with money or a better education might be better able to notice something's wrong with their health. "People with higher education are perhaps more likely to detect symptoms and seek medical care earlier on," ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Brain Tumor, Glioblastoma Multiforme

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