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Related terms: Coagulopathy, Consumption coagulopathy, Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation (DIC), DIC

Could a Therapy for Irregular Heartbeat Harm the Brain?

Posted 24 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 24, 2017 – Catheter ablation is a common treatment for a form of irregular heartbeat known as premature ventricular contractions. Now, a small new study suggests the approach may put some patients at risk for brain injury. The findings are preliminary, but are "relevant to a large number of patients undergoing this procedure," study senior author Dr. Gregory Marcus said in a news release from the University of California, San Francisco. The study suggests that the procedure may help encourage the formation of brain lesions. Marcus, who directs clinical research at UCSF's department of cardiology, said he hopes the research "will inspire many studies to understand the meaning of and how to mitigate these lesions." The study included 18 patients who underwent catheter ablation for premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) – a type of abnormal heartbeat originating in a ... Read more

Related support groups: Bleeding Disorder, Arrhythmia, Diagnosis and Investigation, Brain Anomalies incl Congenital, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Premature Ventricular Depolarizations, Head Imaging

Blood Banks Face Seasonal Shortages, New Screening Rules

Posted 23 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 23, 2016 – There's typically a shortage of both blood and platelets during the holiday season. But, tighter testing for a rare complication of transfusions makes the need for platelets even more urgent, experts at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas say. Platelets are a component of blood that are essential for clotting. The complication, called transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), is the leading cause of death due to transfusions, the experts said. "One reason the supply of blood platelets has decreased is that we now have additional required testing of platelets after donation," said Dr. Thomas Froehlich, medical director at the Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center. Blood and platelet shortages are traditionally common during the holidays. The shortages put cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, trauma victims and people with health issues that ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Bleeding Disorder, Anemia, Blood Transfusion, Folic Acid Deficiency, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Bleeding Associated with Coagulation Defect, Anemia Associated with Chronic Disease, Blood Cell Transplantation

Taking a Holiday Trip? Protect Yourself From Blood Clots

Posted 16 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 16, 2016 – Many Americans will travel afar to celebrate the holidays, potentially putting themselves at risk for deadly blood clots. Sitting for long periods in a car or airplane can limit blood circulation and cause a condition called deep vein thrombosis (DVT). In DVT, blood clots form in the deep veins of the lower legs and thighs. A clot can travel through the bloodstream and lodge in the brain, lungs, heart and other areas, causing severe organ damage and even death. But deep vein thrombosis is easy to prevent, according to Dr. Alan Lumsden, chief of cardiovascular surgery at Houston Methodist DeBakey Heart & Vascular Center. "If you plan to travel overseas or cross-country, make sure you get up and walk around at least every two hours, and try not to sleep more than four hours at a time. Drink plenty of water or juices, wear loose-fitting clothing, eat light meals ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Bleeding Disorder, Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT), Pulmonary Embolism, Deep Vein Thrombosis, Deep Vein Thrombosis - First Event, Deep Vein Thrombosis - Recurrent Event, Deep Vein Thrombosis - Prophylaxis, Coagulation Defects and Disorders

Gene Therapy Offers Hope to Some Hemophilia Patients

Posted 6 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 6, 2016 – Preliminary research suggests that a single dose of an experimental gene therapy may help patients with hemophilia B. As explained by the National Hemophilia Foundation, hemophilia B is a genetic disorder where people lack a protein needed for blood clotting called factor IX, or that the type of factor IX they produce is defective. The condition can lead to excess bleeding and occurs in about one in every 5,000 births, the foundation said. But researchers said they've never seen a medical treatment boost factor IX to the level seen in the new trial. According to the findings, patients who got the gene therapy were able to stop getting infusions of the clotting factor. "Our goal in this trial was to evaluate the safety of the gene therapy product and secondarily, to determine if we could achieve levels of factor IX that could decrease bleeding events in ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Bleeding Disorder, Hemophilia B, Hemophilia

Another Step Closer to Artificial Blood

Posted 4 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, Dec. 3, 2016 – Artificial blood stored as a powder could one day revolutionize emergency medicine and provide trauma victims a better chance of survival. Researchers have created an artificial red blood cell that effectively picks up oxygen in the lungs and delivers it to tissues throughout the body. This artificial blood can be freeze-dried, making it easier for combat medics and paramedics to keep on hand for emergencies, said senior researcher Dr. Allan Doctor. He is a critical care specialist at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. "It's a dried powder that looks like paprika, basically," Doctor said. "It can be stored in an IV plastic bag that a medic would carry, either in their ambulance or in a backpack, for a year or more. When they need to use it, they spike the bag with sterile water, mix it, and it's ready to inject right then and there." The ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Bleeding Disorder, Anemia, Blood Transfusion, Diagnosis and Investigation, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Blood Cell Transplantation

Pradaxa Blood Thinner May Beat Warfarin After Bleeding Episode: Study

Posted 2 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 1, 2016 – Use of a blood thinner is routine for many heart patients, but these drugs come with a risk of episodes of excess bleeding. What, if any, anticoagulant (blood thinner) should these patients take after such episodes arise? A new study suggests that the blood thinner Pradaxa (dabigatran) may be a better choice than the standby drug warfarin in these cases. The reason: Pradaxa is less likely than warfarin to cause recurrent bleeding in patients who recently suffered a bleeding stroke or other major bleeding event, the researchers found. "Our results should encourage clinicians to seriously consider resuming anticoagulation among patients who survived a major bleeding event, particularly if the source of bleeding was identified and addressed," said study senior author Dr. Samir Saba. He's associate chief of cardiology at the University of Pittsburgh Heart and ... Read more

Related support groups: Bleeding Disorder, Warfarin, Coumadin, Ischemic Stroke, Xarelto, Pradaxa, Eliquis, Lovenox, Transient Ischemic Attack, Heparin, Rivaroxaban, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Apixaban, Enoxaparin, Fragmin, Clexane, Arixtra, Hep-Pak, Dalteparin, Jantoven

Testosterone Therapy May Be Linked to Serious Blood Clots

Posted 1 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 30, 2016 – Testosterone treatment can increase a man's risk of potentially fatal blood clots, a new study suggests. Researchers found that men taking the male hormone seem to have a 63 percent increased risk of a blood clot forming in a vein, a condition known as venous thromboembolism (VTE). These clots can cause a heart attack, stroke, organ damage or even death, according to the American Heart Association. "Risk peaks rapidly in the first six months of treatment and lasts for about nine months, and fades gradually thereafter," said lead researcher Dr. Carlos Martinez of the Institute for Epidemiology, Statistics and Informatics in Frankfurt, Germany. Millions of American men currently use testosterone pills, gels or injections, hoping that the male hormone will boost their sex drive, stamina and strength. It's been known for a while that the estrogen in birth control ... Read more

Related support groups: Bleeding Disorder, Testosterone, Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT), AndroGel, Testim, Deep Vein Thrombosis, Axiron, Androderm, Depo-Testosterone, Testopel, Fortesta, Sexual Deviations or Disorders, Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder, Testopel Pellets, Venous Thromboembolism, Testim 5 g/packet, Delatestryl, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Testosterone Topical, Striant

Drug Combo for Irregular Heartbeat Might Raise Bleeding Risk

Posted 21 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 21, 2016 – Because the irregular heartbeat known as atrial fibrillation can trigger stroke-inducing clots, many patients are prescribed a blood thinner. But a new Canadian study suggests that combining one blood thinner, Pradaxa, with certain statin medications could raise the odds for bleeding in these patients. "An increase in the risk of bleeding requiring hospital admission or emergency department visits was seen with lovastatin [Mevacor] and simvastatin [Zocor] compared with the other statins," said study author Tony Antoniou, a pharmacist at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto. His team tracked outcomes for nearly 46,000 patients ages 65 and older. All had atrial fibrillation and took Pradaxa (dabigatran) to reduce their risk of stroke. Those who also took either lovastatin or simvastatin had a 40 percent higher risk of bleeding than those who took other statins, the ... Read more

Related support groups: Bleeding Disorder, Atrial Fibrillation, Lipitor, Simvastatin, Crestor, Atorvastatin, Pravastatin, Pradaxa, Zocor, Lovastatin, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Rosuvastatin, Vytorin, Pravachol, Livalo, Red Yeast Rice, Caduet, Simcor, Lescol, Lescol XL

Health Tip: Control a Bleeding Wound

Posted 9 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Rinsing a wound with cold water helps clean it, but it may not be enough to prevent infection. Bleeding is the body's natural way of cleansing a wound. Then again, too much bleeding isn't healthy either. Here's how to stop heavy bleeding, courtesy of the American Academy of Family Physicians: If available, use a sterile or clean piece of cloth, gauze or tissue. Hold the material over the wound, gently applying pressure. Have another piece of clean material on hand. If the bleeding soaks the first piece, apply another clean piece on top, but don't remove the first piece. Hold the clean material in place for another 20 minutes with firm pressure. Raise a bleeding leg or arm above the level of your heart. Read more

Related support groups: Bleeding Disorder, Scrapes, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Wound Cleansing, Minor Cuts, Minor Skin Conditions, Wound Debridement

Health Tip: Prevent Frequent Nosebleeds

Posted 3 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Frequent nosebleeds often are triggered by dry air. So they may be preventable. The Seattle Children's Hospital offers these prevention strategies: Run a humidifier if the air tends to be dry. This helps keep tissues in the nose moist. Apply a dab of petroleum jelly on the center wall of the nose twice daily. Blow the nose gently. Skip ibuprofen and aspirin, which can increase bleeding. Read more

Related support groups: Bleeding Disorder, Nasal Congestion, Cough and Nasal Congestion

Sleep Apnea May Boost Risk for Post-Op Problems

Posted 17 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 – Sleep apnea may boost the odds of developing two serious health complications following surgery. So, finding out if you have the sleep disorder beforehand – and seeking treatment – could boost your odds for good recovery from surgery, researchers say. The two post-op complications are blood clots in the veins and an irregular heartbeat called atrial fibrillation, according to two new studies. These problems occurred more often among surgical patients who had not yet been diagnosed – and therefore weren't treated – with sleep apnea. Obstructive sleep apnea is characterized by repeated breathing disruptions during sleep. Symptoms include excessive daytime sleepiness, restless sleep and loud snoring – often with periods of silence followed by gasps. More than half of surgery patients who have sleep apnea don't know it, the authors of one new study said. ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Bleeding Disorder, Atrial Fibrillation, Sleep Apnea, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Coagulation Defects and Disorders

When Complications Arise, Some Hospitals Get Paid a Lot More

Posted 12 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 – Medicare pays some U.S. hospitals two to three times more than others to care for older adults who experience complications after major surgery, a new analysis finds. Those higher payments aren't always associated with better clinical care, the study authors said. The findings suggest that some hospitals deal with surgical complications, such as serious bleeding, infection and kidney failure, more efficiently than others, the authors noted. "If we had found that they're spending more money, but they're actually saving people's lives, it's worth it, right?" said Dr. Hari Nathan, the study's senior author. "But that's actually not what we found," said Nathan, an assistant professor of surgery at the University of Michigan Medical School. "They're not actually getting any better outcomes," he said. Hospitals with the highest "cost of rescue" – the costs of ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Bleeding Disorder, Blood Transfusion, Orthopedic Surgery, Postoperative Albumin Loss, Renal and Genitourinary Disorders

C-Section Raises Risk of Blood Clots After Childbirth: Review

Posted 4 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 – Women who have a cesarean section face an increased risk of potentially dangerous blood clots in the legs or lungs following childbirth, a new review confirms. Researchers who analyzed 60 international studies found that women who had a C-section were four times more likely to develop a blood clot than women who delivered vaginally. "Emergency" C-sections – which are done when a vaginal delivery fails – carried the highest risk. Experts said the findings confirm what individual studies have already shown. It has long been clear that pregnancy itself raises a woman's odds of developing blood clots before or in the weeks after delivery. Women who undergo a C-section have an even greater risk – though it's still low, according to the researchers behind the new study. The new study estimates the risk is about three in 1,000. "Even though C-section increases the ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Bleeding Disorder, Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT), Deep Vein Thrombosis, Delivery, Deep Vein Thrombosis - First Event, Deep Vein Thrombosis - Prophylaxis, Deep Vein Thrombosis Prophylaxis after Abdominal Surgery, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Clot Retrieval Device Approval Expanded

Posted 6 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 6, 2016 – Two similar devices that help doctors retrieve blood clots and avoid potential disability among stroke victims have been approved for new uses by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The Trevo devices were first cleared in 2012 to help people who could not be given the clot-busting drug t-PA. The devices, when fully expanded to up to six millimeters in diameter, allow doctors to grip a blood clot inside a vessel and remove it via catheter or sheath, the FDA said in a news release. The new approval expands the devices' use to include a broader group of patients, the agency said. Stroke kills some 130,000 people in the United States annually, making it the 5th-leading cause of death, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Potential risks of the devices include failure to retrieve a clot, device breakage and blood vessel damage. The ... Read more

Related support groups: Bleeding Disorder, Ischemic Stroke, Transient Ischemic Attack, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, IV Catheter Clot

Salt-Based Spray May Help Chronic Nosebleeds

Posted 6 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 6, 2016 – A simple salt-based spray is as effective as medicated sprays in controlling chronic nosebleeds, a new study contends. "This research highlights that there could be a benefit even in the simplest of interventions," said corresponding study author Dr. Kevin Whitehead. He is an associate professor of internal medicine at the University of Utah School of Medicine. People with a condition called hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) are plagued with nosebleeds. Many have one nosebleed a week, and some have more than two a day. The new study included 121 people with the condition who sprayed either a saline solution (salt plus water) or one of three medications – bevacizumab, estriol or tranexamic acid – into their nose twice a day for 12 weeks. The saline spray was as effective in reducing nosebleeds as the drugs, according to the study. "No drug proved to be any ... Read more

Related support groups: Bleeding Disorder, Avastin, Tranexamic Acid, Lysteda, Bevacizumab, Cyklokapron, Rhinaris, Ayr Saline Nasal, ENTsol, Saline Nasal Mist, NasoGel, Afrin Saline, Simply Soothing, Rhino-Mist, Nasal Moist, Nasal Saline, Ocean Complete, SaltAire, Salinex, Saline Mist

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